Political refugees

In this Sept. 15, 2017 file photo, Rohingya Muslims carry food items across from Bangladesh towards no man's land where they have set up a refugee camp, as smoke rise from fire across the border in Myanmar, in Tombru. Some 6,000 Rohingya Muslim refugees who fled attacks in Myanmar last year live at the cloudiest edges of the border with Bangladesh, in a no man’s land that seems to be neither Myanmar nor Bangladesh. Many stay in these places because they are from nearby villages, and can see the wreckage of their former homes. But the Myanmar government insists no man’s land doesn’t exist, and the 6,000 refugees are living inside Myanmar. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)
March 10, 2018 - 2:07 am
ALONG THE BANGLADESH-MYANMAR BORDER (AP) — From their home, a tent hastily erected in a grassy field, the young Muslim Rohingya couple can see the village they left behind last year, fleeing attacks by Buddhist mobs and Myanmar security forces. They arrived in a no man's land, one of the small, ill...
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In this Sept. 15, 2017 file photo, Rohingya Muslims carry food items across from Bangladesh towards no man's land where they have set up a refugee camp, as smoke rise from fire across the border in Myanmar, in Tombru. Some 6,000 Rohingya Muslim refugees who fled attacks in Myanmar last year live at the cloudiest edges of the border with Bangladesh, in a no man’s land that seems to be neither Myanmar nor Bangladesh. Many stay in these places because they are from nearby villages, and can see the wreckage of their former homes. But the Myanmar government insists no man’s land doesn’t exist, and the 6,000 refugees are living inside Myanmar. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)
March 09, 2018 - 9:46 pm
ALONG THE BANGLADESH-MYANMAR BORDER (AP) — From their home, a tent hastily erected in a grassy field, the young Muslim Rohingya couple can see the village they left behind last year, fleeing attacks by Buddhist mobs and Myanmar security forces. They arrived in a no man's land, one of the small, ill...
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In this Sept. 15, 2017 file photo, Rohingya Muslims carry food items across from Bangladesh towards no man's land where they have set up a refugee camp, as smoke rise from fire across the border in Myanmar, in Tombru. Some 6,000 Rohingya Muslim refugees who fled attacks in Myanmar last year live at the cloudiest edges of the border with Bangladesh, in a no man’s land that seems to be neither Myanmar nor Bangladesh. Many stay in these places because they are from nearby villages, and can see the wreckage of their former homes. But the Myanmar government insists no man’s land doesn’t exist, and the 6,000 refugees are living inside Myanmar. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)
March 09, 2018 - 9:44 pm
ALONG THE BANGLADESH-MYANMAR BORDER (AP) — Some 6,000 Rohingya Muslim refugees who fled attacks in Myanmar last year live at the cloudiest edges of the border with Bangladesh, in a no man's land that seems to be neither Myanmar nor Bangladesh. Many stay in these places because they are from nearby...
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Noble Peace Laureate from Yemen Tawakkol Karman, right, holds a Rohingya refugee child during her visit to Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018. Three female Nobel Peace Laureates began a weeklong trip to Bangladesh to meet Rohingya women who have been tortured, raped and even killed by Myanmar soldiers amid a delayed repatriation process. (AP Photo/Suzauddin Rubel)
February 25, 2018 - 8:16 pm
COX'S BAZAR, Bangladesh (AP) — Their houses are often made of plastic sheets. Much of their food comes from aid agencies. Jobs are few, and there is painfully little to do. The nightmares are relentless. But six months after their horrors began, the Rohingya Muslims who fled army attacks in Myanmar...
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February 25, 2018 - 10:12 am
AMMAN, Jordan (AP) — The U.N. agency for children said Sunday that 85 percent of Syrian refugee children in Jordan live in poverty, 38 percent are not in school and almost half of those under the age of five don't have access to proper health care. The findings by UNICEF are based on responses from...
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FILE- In this Nov. 11, 2017 file photo, Rohingya Muslims travel on a raft made with plastic containers on which they crossed over the Naf river from Myanmar into Bangladesh, near Shah Porir Dwip, Bangladesh. Six months after waves of attacks emptied Rohingya villages in Myanmar, sending 700,000 people fleeing into Bangladesh, there are few signs anyone is going home soon. Life isn’t easy in the refugee camps, but the Rohingya living there have one immense consolation. “Nobody is coming to kill us, that’s for sure,” says one man. (AP Photo/A.M. Ahad, File)
February 25, 2018 - 12:05 am
DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Their houses are often made of plastic sheets. Much of their food comes from aid agencies. Jobs are few, and there is painfully little to do. The nightmares are relentless. But six months after their horrors began, the Rohingya Muslims who fled army attacks in Myanmar for...
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Lee Gyeong Pil waits for spectators to arrive at one the entrances of the Gangneung Curling center at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. Lee was among five babies born on an American ship that ferried thousands of Korean refugees from North Korea during the Korean War. Nicknamed by U.S. crew as Kimchi 1 through Kimchi 5, they’ve become a symbol of the South Korea-U.S. military alliance. Lee, Kimchi 5, and his friend Sohn Yang Young, Kimchi 1, were in Gangneung to volunteer for the Olympics as part of their efforts to promote peace and remind younger generations of the lessons of the Korean War. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
February 24, 2018 - 6:17 pm
GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — Their nicknames, bestowed upon them long ago: "Kimchi 1" and "Kimchi 5," babies born aboard a ship that was helping them flee a war and a regime that, thanks to their rescuers, they'd never have to face. Sohn Yang Young says he owes his life to the U.S. military. So...
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Lee Gyeong Pil waits for spectators to arrive at one the entrances of the Gangneung Curling center at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. Lee was among five babies born on an American ship that ferried thousands of Korean refugees from North Korea during the Korean War. Nicknamed by U.S. crew as Kimchi 1 through Kimchi 5, they’ve become a symbol of the South Korea-U.S. military alliance. Lee, Kimchi 5, and his friend Sohn Yang Young, Kimchi 1, were in Gangneung to volunteer for the Olympics as part of their efforts to promote peace and remind younger generations of the lessons of the Korean War. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
February 24, 2018 - 10:01 am
GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — Their nicknames, bestowed upon them long ago: "Kimchi 1" and "Kimchi 5," babies born aboard a ship that was helping them flee a war and a regime that, thanks to their rescuers, they'd never have to face. Sohn Yang Young says he owes his life to the U.S. military. So...
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FILE- In this Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017, file photo, S, 22, mother of one, who says she was raped by members of Myanmar's armed forces in late August, is photographed in her tent in Gundum refugee camp in Bangladesh. Three female Nobel Peace Laureates are beginning a weeklong trip to Bangladesh to meet Rohingya women who have been tortured, raped and even killed by Myanmar soldiers amid a delayed repatriation process. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
February 24, 2018 - 8:34 am
DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Three female Nobel Peace laureates began a weeklong trip to Bangladesh on Saturday to meet Rohingya Muslim women who were tortured and raped by soldiers in Myanmar before fleeing the country. During their visit, Iran's Shirin Ebadi, Yemen's Tawakkol Karman and Northern...
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In this Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018, photo, Eritrean migrant Yohannes Tesfagabr, one of the tens of thousands of African migrants Israel has targeted for deportation, recounts his journey to The Associated Press in Kampala, Uganda. His case highlights the predicament of tens of thousands of Africans in Israel who face jail if they do not accept an offer, allegedly without further assurances of safety, to relocate to an unnamed African country. (AP Photo/Stephen Wandera)
February 21, 2018 - 9:28 pm
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Inside the immigration office in Tel Aviv, Yohannes Tesfagabr considered his options. He could not dare return to his native Eritrea, a country he risked his life to flee in 2010. He also hoped to avoid the fate of compatriots who languished in a notorious desert jail for...
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