Political refugees

FILE - This Wednesday, April 4, 2018, file photo shows a U.S. position, installed near the tense front line between the U.S-backed Syrian Manbij Military Council and the Turkish-backed fighters, in Manbij, north Syria. U.S. forces have set up an observation point in a Syrian town controlled by its Kurdish-led Syrian allies along the border with Turkey in northeastern Syria, scene of recent tension. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)
November 29, 2018 - 8:58 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Syria's U.N. ambassador on Thursday urged Western powers to lift crippling economic sanctions against the war-torn country if they are serious about helping millions of Syrian refugees to return to their homeland. Bashar Ja'afari spoke in the Kazakh capital of Astana where Russia,...
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November 29, 2018 - 8:06 am
LONDON (AP) — The Latest on migration in Europe (all times local): 1 p.m. EU lawmakers say convenient travel without ID checks inside Europe's passport-free Schengen area could be a thing of the past if countries keep prolonging controls on European citizens. Slovenian lawmaker Tanja Fajon —...
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FILE- In this June 18, 2018, file photo immigrant children play outside a former Job Corps site that now houses them in Homestead, Fla. In a Wednesday, Nov. 28, letter to the heads of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Homeland Security, 112 civil liberties and immigrant rights groups, child welfare advocates and privacy activists are crying foul, demanding an immediate halt to what they call an illegal practice. HHS and DHS are obtaining information from detained children on their U.S.-based relatives for reunification, the authors complain, and “using that data to find, arrest and deport those families.” Already, they write, “families have become too scared to step forward to sponsor children.” (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
November 28, 2018 - 8:32 am
Earlier this year, the federal agency tasked with caring for asylum-seeking children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexican border officially took on a new, little heralded role: helping to deport relatives of the young migrants. In a Wednesday letter to the heads of the Department of...
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FILE- In this June 18, 2018, file photo immigrant children play outside a former Job Corps site that now houses them in Homestead, Fla. In a Wednesday, Nov. 28, letter to the heads of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Homeland Security, 112 civil liberties and immigrant rights groups, child welfare advocates and privacy activists are crying foul, demanding an immediate halt to what they call an illegal practice. HHS and DHS are obtaining information from detained children on their U.S.-based relatives for reunification, the authors complain, and “using that data to find, arrest and deport those families.” Already, they write, “families have become too scared to step forward to sponsor children.” (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
November 28, 2018 - 6:44 am
Earlier this year, the federal agency tasked with caring for asylum-seeking children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexican border officially took on a new, little heralded role: helping to deport relatives of the young migrants. In a Wednesday letter to the heads of the Department of...
Read More
FILE- In this June 18, 2018, file photo immigrant children play outside a former Job Corps site that now houses them in Homestead, Fla. In a Wednesday, Nov. 28, letter to the heads of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Homeland Security, 112 civil liberties and immigrant rights groups, child welfare advocates and privacy activists are crying foul, demanding an immediate halt to what they call an illegal practice. HHS and DHS are obtaining information from detained children on their U.S.-based relatives for reunification, the authors complain, and “using that data to find, arrest and deport those families.” Already, they write, “families have become too scared to step forward to sponsor children.” (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
November 28, 2018 - 6:24 am
Earlier this year, the federal agency tasked with caring for asylum-seeking children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexican border officially took on a new, little heralded role: helping to deport relatives of the young migrants. In a Wednesday letter to the heads of the Department of...
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In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo provided by Ivan Pierre Aguirre, migrant teens are led in a line inside the Tornillo detention camp holding more than 2,300 migrant teens in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration announced in June 2018 that it would open the temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers - and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent. (Ivan Pierre Aguirre via AP)
November 28, 2018 - 12:31 am
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Trump administration has put the safety of thousands of teens at a migrant detention camp at risk by waiving FBI fingerprint checks for their caregivers and short-staffing mental health workers, according to an Associated Press investigation and a new federal watchdog...
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In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo provided by Ivan Pierre Aguirre, migrant teens held inside the Tornillo detention camp look at protestors waving at them outside the fences surrounding the facility in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration announced in June 2018 that it would open the temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers - and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent. (Ivan Pierre Aguirre via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 5:40 pm
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Trump administration announced in June it would open a temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers — and it shows...
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In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo provided by Ivan Pierre Aguirre, migrant teens are led in a line inside the Tornillo detention camp holding more than 2,300 migrant teens in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration announced in June 2018 that it would open the temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers - and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent. (Ivan Pierre Aguirre via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 5:05 pm
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Trump administration has put the safety of thousands of teens at a migrant detention camp at risk by waiving FBI fingerprint checks for their caregivers and short-staffing mental health workers, according to an Associated Press investigation and a new federal watchdog...
Read More
In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo provided by Ivan Pierre Aguirre, migrant teens held inside the Tornillo detention camp look at protestors waving at them outside the fences surrounding the facility in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration announced in June 2018 that it would open the temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers - and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent. (Ivan Pierre Aguirre via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 3:46 pm
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Trump administration announced in June it would open a temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers — and it shows...
Read More
In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo provided by Ivan Pierre Aguirre, migrant teens are led in a line inside the Tornillo detention camp holding more than 2,300 migrant teens in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration announced in June 2018 that it would open the temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers - and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent. (Ivan Pierre Aguirre via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 1:41 pm
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Trump administration announced in June it would open a temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers — and it shows...
Read More

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