Planetary systems

FILE - In this July 14, 2019, file photo, a telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest mountain is viewed. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit. Astronomers said Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, they will attempt to resume observations but in some cases won’t be able to make up the missed research. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
August 10, 2019 - 8:18 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Asteroids, including those that might slam into Earth. Clouds of gas and dust on the verge of forming stars. Planets orbiting stars other than our own. This is some of the research astronomers say they have missed out on at 11 observatories on Hawaii's tallest mountain as a protest...
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FILE - In this July 14, 2019, file photo, a telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest mountain is viewed. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit. Astronomers said Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, they will attempt to resume observations but in some cases won’t be able to make up the missed research. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
August 10, 2019 - 2:30 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Asteroids, including those that might slam into Earth. Clouds of gas and dust on the verge of forming stars. Planets orbiting stars other than our own. This is some of the research astronomers say they missed out on as a protest blocked the road to Hawaii's tallest mountain, one of...
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FILE - In this Sunday, July 14, 2019, file photo, the sun sets behind telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea. Scientists are expected to explore fundamental questions about our universe when they use a giant new telescope planned for the summit of Hawaii’s tallest mountain. That includes whether there’s life outside our solar system and how stars and galaxies formed in the earliest years of the universe. But some Native Hawaiians don’t want the Thirty Meter Telescope to be built at Mauna Kea’s summit, saying it will further harm a place they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
July 19, 2019 - 10:06 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape galaxies? Scientists are expected to explore those and other fundamental questions about the universe when they peer deep into the night...
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FILE - In this Sunday, July 14, 2019, file photo, the sun sets behind telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea. Scientists are expected to explore fundamental questions about our universe when they use a giant new telescope planned for the summit of Hawaii’s tallest mountain. That includes whether there’s life outside our solar system and how stars and galaxies formed in the earliest years of the universe. But some Native Hawaiians don’t want the Thirty Meter Telescope to be built at Mauna Kea’s summit, saying it will further harm a place they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
July 19, 2019 - 10:35 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape galaxies? Scientists are expected to explore those and other fundamental questions about the universe when they peer deep into the night...
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This image released Wednesday, April 10, 2019, by Event Horizon Telescope shows a black hole. Scientists revealed the first image ever made of a black hole after assembling data gathered by a network of radio telescopes around the world. (Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration/Maunakea Observatories via AP)
April 12, 2019 - 9:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The newly pictured supermassive black hole is a beast with no name, at least not an official one. And what happens next could be cosmically confusing. The team of astronomers who created the image of the black hole called it M87(asterisk). (The asterisk is silent.) A language...
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This image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows an explosive dropped from Hayabusa2 spacecraft to make a crater on the asteroid Ryugu Friday, April 5, 2019. Japan's space agency JAXA said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped the "small carry-on impactor" made of copper onto the asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. (JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 8:57 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said an explosive dropped Friday from its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully blasted the surface of an asteroid for the first time to form a crater and pave the way for the collection of underground samples for possible clues to the origin of the solar system...
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This image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows an explosive dropped from Hayabusa2 spacecraft to make a crater on the asteroid Ryugu Friday, April 5, 2019. Japan's space agency JAXA said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped the "small carry-on impactor" made of copper onto the asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. (JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 6:00 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said an explosive dropped Friday from its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully blasted the surface of an asteroid for the first time to form a crater and pave the way for the collection of underground samples for possible clues to the origin of the solar system...
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This image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows an explosive dropped from Hayabusa2 spacecraft to make a crater on the asteroid Ryugu Friday, April 5, 2019. Japan's space agency JAXA said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped the "small carry-on impactor" made of copper onto the asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. (JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 3:35 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped an explosive designed to make a crater on an asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. Friday's crater mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it had...
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In this computer graphics image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Hayabusa2 spacecraft is seen above on the asteroid Ryugu. Japan's space agency JAXA said Friday, April 5, 2019, its Hayabusa2 spacecraft released an explosive onto an asteroid to make a crater on its surface and collect underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. The mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it has to immediately get away so it won't get hit by flying shards from the blast. (ISAS/JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 3:23 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully dropped an explosive designed to make a crater on an asteroid and collect its underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. Friday's crater mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it had...
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This image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows the asteroid Ryugu Friday, April 5, 2019. Japan's space agency JAXA said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft released an explosive onto the asteroid to make a crater on its surface and collect underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. Friday's mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it has to immediately get away so it won't get hit by flying shards from the blast. (JAXA via AP)
April 05, 2019 - 12:33 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's space agency said its Hayabusa2 spacecraft released an explosive onto an asteroid to make a crater on its surface and collect underground samples to find possible clues to the origin of the solar system. Friday's crater mission is the riskiest for Hayabusa2, as it had to...
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