Pig farming

Residents step out of a high water vehicle after being evacuated by the police when their neighborhood began to flood as Florence continues to dump heavy rain in Fayetteville, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
September 16, 2018 - 4:21 pm
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on Tropical Depression Florence (all times local): 4:15 p.m. Duke Energy says the collapse of a coal ash landfill at a closed power station near the North Carolina coast is an "ongoing situation," with an unknown amount of potentially contaminated storm water...
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A member of the U.S. Coast Guard walks down Mill Creek Road checking houses after tropical storm Florence hit Newport N.C., Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Tom Copeland)
September 16, 2018 - 2:02 pm
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on Tropical Depression Florence (all times local): 2 p.m. The death toll from Florence has risen to 15. The South Carolina Highway Patrol says a pickup truck was traveling west on Interstate 20 in Kershaw County on Sunday morning when it went off the roadway...
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A storm front passes homes in North Topsail Beach, N.C., prior to Hurricane Florence moving toward the east coast on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. (AP Photo/Tom Copeland)
September 13, 2018 - 11:42 am
MIAMI (AP) — Hurricane Florence is at the doorstep of North and South Carolina, and she's not going away anytime soon. Outer bands from the hurricane are now lashing land , at least a full day before the National Hurricane Center expects the slow-moving storm's eye to blow ashore around the North...
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A storm front passes homes in North Topsail Beach, N.C., prior to Hurricane Florence moving toward the east coast on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. (AP Photo/Tom Copeland)
September 13, 2018 - 1:33 am
MIAMI (AP) — A big one. A monster. A once-in-a-lifetime storm. Hurricane Florence deserves all the names it's being called as it threatens to cause historic flooding, blow catastrophic winds and idle for days over the Carolinas and the Mid-Atlantic. Adding to the storm stress is uncertainty about...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 5:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are parking cars in service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Carolina could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia, businesses are bracing for the...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 4:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are moving cars into service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Carolina could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia, businesses are bracing for the...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 3:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are moving cars into service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Caroline could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas and parts of Virginia, businesses are bracing for the...
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The bronze statue of Neptune stands with the sunrise behind, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, in Virginia Beach, Va., as Hurricane Florence moves towards eastern shore. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
September 12, 2018 - 8:17 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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FILE - In this Sept. 24, 1999, file photo, employees of Murphy Family Farms along with friends and neighbors, float a group of dead pigs down a flooded road on Rabon Maready's farm near Beulaville, N.C. The hogs drowned from the floodwaters of the NE Cape Fear River after heavy rains from Hurricane Floyd flooded the area. The heavy rain expected from Hurricane Florence could flood hog manure pits, coal ash dumps and other industrial sites in North Carolina, creating a noxious witches’ brew of waste that might wash into homes and threaten drinking water supplies. (AP Photo/Alan Marler, File)
September 12, 2018 - 8:02 am
Hurricane Florence's heavy rains could cause an environmental disaster in North Carolina, where waste from hog manure pits, coal ash dumps and other industrial sites could wash into homes and threaten drinking water supplies. Computer models predict more than 3 feet of rain in the eastern part of...
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The bronze statue of Neptune stands with the sunrise behind, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, in Virginia Beach, Va., as Hurricane Florence moves towards eastern shore. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
September 12, 2018 - 7:50 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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