Pharmaceutical manufacturing

FILE - This Oct. 14, 2015, file photo shows the Food and Drug Administration campus in Silver Spring, Md. The FDA receives about 1,000 requests to use experimental drugs for “compassionate use” each year and approves more than 99 percent of them, according to agency figures. The process usually takes about four days, although in emergency cases regulators can grant permission immediately over the phone. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
March 22, 2018 - 1:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The idea is a political crowd-pleaser with a catchy slogan: giving desperately ill patients the "right to try" experimental medicines. Lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday became the latest group of politicians to back the effort, sending a bill to the...
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Specialist Robert Tuccillo, right, works with traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Thursday, March 15, 2018. U.S. stocks are slightly higher Thursday morning as technology and health care companies move up after two days of broad losses. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
March 15, 2018 - 1:56 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Coming off two days of losses, U.S. stocks are mostly lower Thursday after a midday rally faded. Chemicals maker Monsanto is falling after Bloomberg News reported that U.S. authorities have concerns about its sale to Bayer. Household goods makers and smaller companies are also down...
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March 13, 2018 - 7:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The House rejected legislation Tuesday easing how experimental drugs are provided to people with terminal illnesses, as Democrats calling the bill risky and misleading overcame support from President Donald Trump and emotional arguments by patients and Republican lawmakers backing...
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FILE - In this March 6, 2018, file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., pauses as he speakers to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. A Republican bill easing how experimental drugs are provided to people with terminal illnesses is headed toward a House vote. But opposition by top Democrats and scores of patients’ groups has left its fate uncertain. The “Right to Try” legislation is backed by President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence. Republicans say it would give hope to patients with fatal diseases, while Democrats say it’s unneeded and risky. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 13, 2018 - 7:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The House rejected legislation Tuesday easing how experimental drugs are provided to people with terminal illnesses, as Democrats calling the bill risky and misleading overcame support from President Donald Trump and emotional arguments by patients and Republican lawmakers backing...
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FILE - In this Feb. 24, 2018, file photo, Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar speaks at the National Governor Association 2018 winter meeting in Washington. The Trump administration is taking a pragmatic new track on health care with officials promising consumer-friendly changes and savings in areas from computerized medical records to prescription drugs. Azar has been rolling out the agenda, saying it has the full backing of President Donald Trump.(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
March 12, 2018 - 12:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A smartphone app that lets Medicare patients access their claims information. Giving consumers a share of drug company rebates for their prescriptions. Wider access to websites that reliably compare cost and quality of medical tests. The Trump administration is taking a pragmatic...
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This undated product image provided by Sanofi shows Praluent 75 mg, a drug sold by Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. It’s one of a new class of cholesterol medicines that lower cholesterol far more than statin medicines can. A key study tested whether it also reduces heart attack risks and deaths. (Sanofi via AP)
March 10, 2018 - 10:40 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A newer cholesterol drug, used with older statin medicines, modestly lowered heart risks and deaths in a big study of heart attack survivors that might persuade insurers to cover the pricey treatment more often. Results on the drug, Praluent (PRALL-yoo-ent), were announced...
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This undated product image provided by Sanofi shows Praluent 75 mg, a drug sold by Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. It’s one of a new class of cholesterol medicines that lower cholesterol far more than statin medicines can. A key study tested whether it also reduces heart attack risks and deaths. (Sanofi via AP)
March 10, 2018 - 10:28 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A newer cholesterol drug, used with older statin medicines, modestly lowered heart risks and deaths in a big study of heart attack survivors that might persuade insurers to cover the pricey treatment more often. Results on the drug, Praluent (PRALL-yoo-ent), were announced...
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FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2017 file photo, former pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli speaks during an interview by Maria Bartiromo during her "Mornings with Maria Bartiromo" program on the Fox Business Network, in New York. Shkreli became notorious for raising the price of a life-saving drug by 5,000 percent and trolling critics on the internet with his snarky "Pharma Bro" persona. A federal judge in Brooklyn will have to weigh the conflicting portrayals of Shkreli on Friday, March 9, 2018, at his sentencing on a securities fraud conviction. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
March 09, 2018 - 11:36 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the sentencing of "Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli (all times local): 11:30 a.m. A defense lawyer for "Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli (SHKREL'-ee) says his client shouldn't be sentenced to a more severe punishment because he is outspoken. Attorney Benjamin Brafman is speaking...
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FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2017 file photo, former pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli speaks during an interview by Maria Bartiromo during her "Mornings with Maria Bartiromo" program on the Fox Business Network, in New York. Shkreli became notorious for raising the price of a life-saving drug by 5,000 percent and trolling critics on the internet with his snarky "Pharma Bro" persona. A federal judge in Brooklyn will have to weigh the conflicting portrayals of Shkreli on Friday, March 9, 2018, at his sentencing on a securities fraud conviction. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
March 09, 2018 - 12:02 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Is "Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli a manipulator who conned wealthy investors or a misunderstood eccentric who made those same investors even wealthier? A federal judge in Brooklyn will have to weigh the conflicting portrayals of the former pharmaceutical company CEO on Friday at his...
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FILE - In this Aug. 4, 2017 file photo, Martin Shkreli, center, leaves federal court in New York. A judge has ruled that "Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli was responsible for nearly $10.5 million in losses in his securities fraud case. The amount set on Monday by Judge Kiyo Matsumoto could result in a harsher punishment for Shkreli at his March 9 sentencing. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
February 28, 2018 - 9:38 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — "Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli admitted that he was "very far from blameless" in a letter to a judge asking for leniency, according to court filings. "I was wrong, I was a fool. I should have known better," Shkreli wrote in his letter to Brooklyn federal court Judge Kiyo Matsumoto. "I...
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