Pharmaceutical manufacturing

FILE - In this July 23, 2019, file photo, Gov. Gavin Newsom talks to reporters at his Capitol office, in Sacramento, Calif. California could become the first state with its own prescription drug label. Newsom announced Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020, he wants California to contract with generic drug companies to make prescription medications on behalf of the state so it can sell them to the public. He said the goal is to lower prices by increasing competition in the generic market. State lawmakers must approve the plan before it can take effect. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
January 09, 2020 - 8:39 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California could become the first state to make its own prescription drugs under a proposal announced Thursday by Gov. Gavin Newsom, who says it would “take the power out of the hands of greedy pharmaceutical companies." The Democratic governor wants the nation's most...
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FILE - In this July 23, 2019, file photo, Gov. Gavin Newsom talks to reporters at his Capitol office, in Sacramento, Calif. California could become the first state with its own prescription drug label. Newsom announced Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020, he wants California to contract with generic drug companies to make prescription medications on behalf of the state so it can sell them to the public. He said the goal is to lower prices by increasing competition in the generic market. State lawmakers must approve the plan before it can take effect. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
January 09, 2020 - 6:32 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California could become the first state to make its own prescription drugs under a proposal announced Thursday by Gov. Gavin Newsom, who says it would “take the power out of the hands of greedy pharmaceutical companies." The Democratic governor wants the nation's most...
Read More
FILE - In this July 23, 2019, file photo, Gov. Gavin Newsom talks to reporters at his Capitol office, in Sacramento, Calif. California could become the first state with its own prescription drug label. Newsom announced Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020, he wants California to contract with generic drug companies to make prescription medications on behalf of the state so it can sell them to the public. He said the goal is to lower prices by increasing competition in the generic market. State lawmakers must approve the plan before it can take effect. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
January 09, 2020 - 2:15 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California could become the first state with its own prescription drug label under a proposal that Gov. Gavin Newsom unveiled Thursday in a bid to lower prices by increasing competition in the generic market. Newsom wants the nation's most populous state, home to nearly 40...
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FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2019 photo, President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media following a Christmas Eve video teleconference with members of the military at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla. As a candidate for the White House, Donald Trump repeatedly promised that he would “immediately” replace President Barack Obama’s health care law with a plan of his own that would provide “insurance for everybody.” Back then, Trump made it sound that his plan — “much less expensive and much better” than the Affordable Care Act — was imminent. And he put drug companies on notice that their pricing power no longer would be “politically protected.” Nearly three years after taking office, Americans still are waiting for Trump’s big reveal. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
December 30, 2019 - 3:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — As a candidate for the White House, Donald Trump repeatedly promised that he would “immediately” replace President Barack Obama’s health care law with a plan of his own that would provide “insurance for everybody.” Back then, Trump made it sound that his plan — “much less...
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FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2019 photo, President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media following a Christmas Eve video teleconference with members of the military at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla. As a candidate for the White House, Donald Trump repeatedly promised that he would “immediately” replace President Barack Obama’s health care law with a plan of his own that would provide “insurance for everybody.” Back then, Trump made it sound that his plan — “much less expensive and much better” than the Affordable Care Act — was imminent. And he put drug companies on notice that their pricing power no longer would be “politically protected.” Nearly three years after taking office, Americans still are waiting for Trump’s big reveal. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
December 30, 2019 - 12:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — As a candidate for the White House, Donald Trump repeatedly promised that he would “immediately” replace President Barack Obama’s health care law with a plan of his own that would provide “insurance for everybody.” Back then, Trump made it sound that his plan — “much less...
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Democratic presidential candidate South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
December 21, 2019 - 1:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The financial sector, blamed by progressives for spawning the 2008 economic collapse, is lining up behind Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign. The mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has collected more campaign cash from donors and political action committees tied to the financial,...
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Democratic presidential candidate South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
December 20, 2019 - 6:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The financial sector, blamed by progressives for spawning the 2008 economic collapse, is lining up behind Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign. The mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has collected more campaign cash from donors and political action committees tied to the financial,...
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FILE - This June 15, 2018, file photo shows pharmaceuticals in North Andover, Mass. A revamped North American trade deal is nearing passage in Congress, giving both the White House and House Democrats cause to claim victory. There is relief, too, for farmers and businesses that wanted clearer rules governing the vast flow of goods among the United States, Canada and Mexico. But the pact left at least one surprising loser: The pharmaceutical industry, a near-invincible lobbying powerhouse in Washington. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
December 19, 2019 - 4:43 pm
A revamped North American trade deal nearing passage in Congress gives both the White House and Democrats a chance to claim victory and offers farmers and businesses clearer rules governing the vast flow of goods among the United States, Canada and Mexico. But the pact leaves at least one...
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FILE - This June 15, 2018, file photo shows pharmaceuticals in North Andover, Mass. A revamped North American trade deal is nearing passage in Congress, giving both the White House and House Democrats cause to claim victory. There is relief, too, for farmers and businesses that wanted clearer rules governing the vast flow of goods among the United States, Canada and Mexico. But the pact left at least one surprising loser: The pharmaceutical industry, a near-invincible lobbying powerhouse in Washington. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
December 19, 2019 - 11:07 am
A revamped North American trade deal is nearing passage in Congress, giving both the White House and House Democrats cause to claim victory. There is relief, too, for farmers and businesses that wanted clearer rules governing the vast flow of goods among the United States, Canada and Mexico. But...
Read More
This image provided by Sarepta Therapeutics in December 2019 shows a box and vial of their drug Vyondys 53. On Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, U.S. health regulators said they approved this second drug for a debilitating form of muscular dystrophy, a surprise decision after the medication was rejected for safety concerns just four months earlier. (Sarepta Therapeutics via AP)
December 13, 2019 - 4:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators approved a second drug for a debilitating form of muscular dystrophy, a surprise decision after the medication was rejected for safety concerns just four months ago. The ruling marks the second time the Food and Drug Administration has granted preliminary...
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