Passports and visas

FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2016, file photo, Naila Amin, 26, holds a book from one of the classes she was taking at Nassau Community College in Garden City, N.Y. According to data provided to The Associated Press, the U.S. approved thousands of requests by men to bring child and teenage brides from another country. “My passport ruined my life,” said Naila Amin, a dual citizen from Pakistan who grew up in New York City. She was forcibly married at 13 in Pakistan and applied for papers for her 26-year-old husband to come to the country. “People die to come to America. I was a passport to him. They all wanted him here, and that was the way to do it.” (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
January 11, 2019 - 2:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of requests by men to bring in child and adolescent brides to live in the United States were approved over the past decade, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. In one case, a 49-year-old man applied for admission for a 15-year-old girl. The...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2016, file photo, Naila Amin, 26, holds a book from one of the classes she was taking at Nassau Community College in Garden City, N.Y. According to data provided to The Associated Press, the U.S. approved thousands of requests by men to bring child and teenage brides from another country. “My passport ruined my life,” said Naila Amin, a dual citizen from Pakistan who grew up in New York City. She was forcibly married at 13 in Pakistan and applied for papers for her 26-year-old husband to come to the country. “People die to come to America. I was a passport to him. They all wanted him here, and that was the way to do it.” (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
January 11, 2019 - 1:44 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of requests by men to bring in child and adolescent brides to live in the United States were approved over the past decade, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. In one case, a 49-year-old man applied for admission for a 15-year-old girl. The...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2016, file photo, Naila Amin, 26, holds a book from one of the classes she was taking at Nassau Community College in Garden City, N.Y. According to data provided to The Associated Press, the U.S. approved thousands of requests by men to bring child and teenage brides from another country. “My passport ruined my life,” said Naila Amin, a dual citizen from Pakistan who grew up in New York City. She was forcibly married at 13 in Pakistan and applied for papers for her 26-year-old husband to come to the country. “People die to come to America. I was a passport to him. They all wanted him here, and that was the way to do it.” (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
January 11, 2019 - 10:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of requests by men to bring in child and adolescent brides to live in the United States were approved over the past decade, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. In one case, a 49-year-old man applied for admission for a 15-year-old girl. The...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2016, file photo, Naila Amin, 26, holds a book from one of the classes she was taking at Nassau Community College in Garden City, N.Y. According to data provided to The Associated Press, the U.S. approved thousands of requests by men to bring child and teenage brides from another country. “My passport ruined my life,” said Naila Amin, a dual citizen from Pakistan who grew up in New York City. She was forcibly married at 13 in Pakistan and applied for papers for her 26-year-old husband to come to the country. “People die to come to America. I was a passport to him. They all wanted him here, and that was the way to do it.” (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
January 11, 2019 - 9:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of requests by men to bring in child and adolescent brides to live in the United States were approved over the past decade, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. In one case, a 49-year-old man applied for admission for a 15-year-old girl. The...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2016, file photo, Naila Amin, 26, holds a book from one of the classes she was taking at Nassau Community College in Garden City, N.Y. According to data provided to The Associated Press, the U.S. approved thousands of requests by men to bring child and teenage brides from another country. “My passport ruined my life,” said Naila Amin, a dual citizen from Pakistan who grew up in New York City. She was forcibly married at 13 in Pakistan and applied for papers for her 26-year-old husband to come to the country. “People die to come to America. I was a passport to him. They all wanted him here, and that was the way to do it.” (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
January 11, 2019 - 7:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of requests by men to bring in child and adolescent brides to live in the United States were approved over the past decade, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. In one case, a 49-year-old man applied for admission for a 15-year-old girl. The...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2016, file photo, Naila Amin, 26, holds a book from one of the classes she was taking at Nassau Community College in Garden City, N.Y. According to data provided to The Associated Press, the U.S. approved thousands of requests by men to bring child and teenage brides from another country. “My passport ruined my life,” said Naila Amin, a dual citizen from Pakistan who grew up in New York City. She was forcibly married at 13 in Pakistan and applied for papers for her 26-year-old husband to come to the country. “People die to come to America. I was a passport to him. They all wanted him here, and that was the way to do it.” (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
January 11, 2019 - 5:17 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of requests by men to bring in child and adolescent brides to live in the United States were approved over the past decade, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. In one case, a 49-year-old man applied for admission for a 15-year-old girl. The...
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FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2019, file photo released by the Immigration Bureau, Saudi woman Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun, foreground, walks by Chief of Immigration Police Maj. Gen. Surachate Hakparn, right, before leaving the Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok, Thailand. Australia says it is considering granting the Saudi who fled from her family refugee resettlement based on referral by the U.N. (Immigration police via AP, File)
January 09, 2019 - 2:28 am
BANGKOK (AP) — Australia will assess runaway Saudi woman Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun for settlement after the United Nations on Wednesday deemed her a refugee. The Department of Home Affairs confirmed in a statement that the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees had referred 18-year-old Alqunun to...
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In this December 2018 photo released by the Council on American Islamic Relations, Sacramento Valley, Shaima Swileh, of Yemen, holds her dying 2-year old son Abdullah Hassan at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland, Calif. USA. The Council on American-Islamic Relations announced Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, that Abdullah died at the Oakland hospital, where his father Ali Hassan brought him in the fall to get treatment for a genetic brain disorder. Swileh, who is not an American citizen, sued the Trump administration to let her into the country to be with the ailing boy. (Council on American Islamic Relations, Sacramento Valley via AP)
December 29, 2018 - 10:22 am
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The 2-year-old son of a Yemeni woman who sued the Trump administration to let her into the country to be with the ailing boy has died, the Council on American-Islamic Relations announced. Abdullah Hassan died Friday in UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland, where his...
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FILE - In this recent undated photo, released Monday, Dec. 17, 2018, by the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Sacramento, Calif., Ali Hassan kissing his dying 2-year-old son Abdullah in a Sacramento hospital. Abdullah Hassan, the son of a Yemeni woman who sued the Trump administration to let her into the country to be with the ailing boy has died. The Council on American-Islamic Relations announced Friday, Dec. 28 that Abdullah died in an Oakland, Calif., hospital. He suffered from a genetic brain condition. (Council on American-Islamic Relations via AP, File)
December 29, 2018 - 9:33 am
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The 2-year-old son of a Yemeni woman who sued the Trump administration to let her into the country to be with the ailing boy has died, the Council on American-Islamic Relations announced. Abdullah Hassan died Friday in UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland, where his...
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FILE - In this recent undated photo, released Monday, Dec. 17, 2018, by the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Sacramento, Calif., Ali Hassan kissing his dying 2-year-old son Abdullah in a Sacramento hospital. Abdullah Hassan, the son of a Yemeni woman who sued the Trump administration to let her into the country to be with the ailing boy has died. The Council on American-Islamic Relations announced Friday, Dec. 28 that Abdullah died in an Oakland, Calif., hospital. He suffered from a genetic brain condition. (Council on American-Islamic Relations via AP, File)
December 29, 2018 - 8:55 am
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The 2-year-old son of a Yemeni woman who sued the Trump administration to let her into the country to be with the ailing boy has died, the Council on American-Islamic Relations announced. Abdullah Hassan died in UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland, where his father...
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