Parks

In this Nov. 25, 2019 photo, highway BR-163 stretches between the Tapajos National Forest, left, and a soy field in Belterra, Para state, Brazil. Carved through jungle during Brazil’s military dictatorship in the 1970s, this highway and BR-230, known as the Trans-Amazon, were built to bend nature to man’s will in the vast hinterland. Four decades later, there’s development taking shape, but also worsening deforestation. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
December 12, 2019 - 9:51 pm
TRAIRAO, Brazil (AP) — Night falls in Brazil’s Amazon and two logging trucks without license plates emerge from the jungle. They rumble over dirt roads that lead away from a national forest, carrying trunks of trees hundreds of years old. After pulling onto a darkened highway, the truckers chug to...
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In this Nov. 25, 2019 photo, highway BR-163 stretches between the Tapajos National Forest, left, and a soy field in Belterra, Para state, Brazil. Carved through jungle during Brazil’s military dictatorship in the 1970s, this highway and BR-230, known as the Trans-Amazon, were built to bend nature to man’s will in the vast hinterland. Four decades later, there’s development taking shape, but also worsening deforestation. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
December 12, 2019 - 11:03 am
TRAIRAO, Brazil (AP) — Night falls in Brazil’s Amazon and two logging trucks without license plates emerge from the jungle. They rumble over dirt roads that lead away from a national forest, carrying trunks of trees hundreds of years old. After pulling onto a darkened highway, the truckers chug to...
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FILE - In this Feb. 8, 2019 photo file, shows the gypsum sand dunes at White Sands National Monument near Alamogordo, N.M. The New Mexico group Cowboys for Trump is facing criticism after a member bragged the group brought iconic gypsum sands from the White Sands National Monument to Washington for a Christmas Tree lighting ceremony on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2019, in a possible violation of federal law. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
December 06, 2019 - 5:18 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Iconic gypsum sand that the group Cowboys for Trump had said was from White Sands National Monument in New Mexico and was sent to Washington for the U.S. Capitol Tree lighting ceremony this week was actually gathered just outside the monument, one of the group's co-founders...
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FILE - In this Feb. 8, 2019 photo file, shows the gypsum sand dunes at White Sands National Monument near Alamogordo, N.M. The New Mexico group Cowboys for Trump is facing criticism after a member bragged the group brought iconic gypsum sands from the White Sands National Monument to Washington for a Christmas Tree lighting ceremony on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2019, in a possible violation of federal law. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
December 06, 2019 - 5:16 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Iconic gypsum sand that the group Cowboys for Trump had said was from White Sands National Monument in New Mexico and was sent to Washington for the U.S. Capitol Tree lighting ceremony this week was actually gathered just outside the monument, one of the group's co-founders...
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FILE - In this Feb. 8, 2019 photo file, shows the gypsum sand dunes at White Sands National Monument near Alamogordo, N.M. The New Mexico group Cowboys for Trump is facing criticism after a member bragged the group brought iconic gypsum sands from the White Sands National Monument to Washington for a Christmas Tree lighting ceremony on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2019, in a possible violation of federal law. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
December 06, 2019 - 2:46 pm
ALAMOGORDO, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico group Cowboys for Trump faces criticism after members brought iconic gypsum sands from White Sands National Monument to Washington for the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree lighting ceremony — a possible violation of federal law. Otero County Commission Chairman and...
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This undated image provided by the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico shows a sandal (Catalogue No. 2009.46.1) excavated decades ago from the Guadalupe Mountains. Researchers will be taking a new look at numerous perishable artifacts that include sandals and baskets to learn more about the people who once inhabited the region. (Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, The University of New Mexico via AP)
December 02, 2019 - 6:10 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Sandals and baskets that have withstood the ravages of time will be among the perishable artifacts analyzed by a team of scientists looking to learn more about a corner of the southwestern United States that was first excavated decades ago. Depending on what they uncover,...
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November 26, 2019 - 8:52 am
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Each Thanksgiving, families and friends across America face off in backyards or public parks in pre-meal football games they dub “Turkey Bowl.” Now, there’s a way to determine which side is favored to win — a way you can bet on. Bookmaker William Hill US has come up with...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 1994, file photo, two bison graze in a meadow in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. New research shows when bison heavily graze an area, the grass greens up earlier and faster and stays green for a much longer period of time. Researchers with the park and area universities say the bison are able to graze in one area for two to three months rather than having to move to higher elevations to follow new plant growth. Sensors on NASA satellites are able to observe the grassland dynamics. (AP Photo/Dave Zalubowski, File)
November 21, 2019 - 12:16 pm
MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — A study of grazing in Yellowstone National Park found that bison essentially mow and fertilize their own food. This allows them to graze in one area for two to three months during the spring and summer while other hoofed mammals must keep migrating to higher elevations to...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. (Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
November 20, 2019 - 7:09 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. (Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
November 20, 2019 - 6:41 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the...
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