Online media industry

Some of the Facebook and Instagram ads linked to a Russian effort to disrupt the American political process and stir up tensions around divisive social issues, released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee, are photographed in Washington, on Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. A report compiled by private researchers and released by the Senate intelligence committee Monday says that "active and ongoing" Russian interference operations still exist on social media platforms, and that the Russian operation discovered after the 2016 presidential election was much broader than once thought. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
December 18, 2018 - 12:40 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Russia's sweeping political disinformation campaign on U.S. social media was more far-reaching than originally thought, with troll farms working to discourage black voters and "blur the lines between reality and fiction" to help elect Donald Trump in 2016, according to reports...
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Some of the Facebook and Instagram ads linked to a Russian effort to disrupt the American political process and stir up tensions around divisive social issues, released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee, are photographed in Washington, on Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. A report compiled by private researchers and released by the Senate intelligence committee Monday says that "active and ongoing" Russian interference operations still exist on social media platforms, and that the Russian operation discovered after the 2016 presidential election was much broader than once thought. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
December 17, 2018 - 10:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Russia's sweeping political disinformation campaign on U.S. social media was more far-reaching than originally thought, with troll farms working to discourage black voters and "blur the lines between reality and fiction" to help elect Donald Trump in 2016, according to reports...
Read More
Some of the Facebook and Instagram ads linked to a Russian effort to disrupt the American political process and stir up tensions around divisive social issues, released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee, are photographed in Washington, on Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. A report compiled by private researchers and released by the Senate intelligence committee Monday says that "active and ongoing" Russian interference operations still exist on social media platforms, and that the Russian operation discovered after the 2016 presidential election was much broader than once thought. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
December 17, 2018 - 12:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Russia's sweeping political disinformation campaign on U.S. social media was more far-reaching than originally thought, with troll farms working to discourage black voters and "blur the lines between reality and fiction" to help elect Donald Trump in 2016, according to reports...
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FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2014, file photo, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong is interviewed during "Opening Bell with Maria Bartiromo," on the Fox Business Network, in New York. Shares of Verizon are falling before the opening bell after the company said it would take a $4.6 billion hit for what’s become an expensive internet foray with Yahoo and AOL. The two companies, which came to be called Oath under Verizon, has yet to pan out. In September, Verizon announced that Oath CEO Armstrong was leaving. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
December 12, 2018 - 9:31 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Shares of Verizon slipped before the opening bell Wednesday with the company taking a $4.6 billion hit on what's become an expensive internet foray that's never panned out. In a regulatory filing late Tuesday, Verizon Communications Inc. said it will take a charge in the fourth...
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FILE- In this April 10, 2018, file photo Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pauses while testifying before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. The British Parliament has released some 250 pages worth of documents that show Facebook considered charging developers for data access. The documents show internal discussions about linking data to revenue. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
December 05, 2018 - 12:01 pm
LONDON (AP) — A U.K. Parliament committee accused Facebook on Wednesday of cutting special deals with some advertisers to give them more access to data as it released 250 pages worth of documents on the tech giant's internal discussions about the value of users' personal information. Parliament's...
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December 05, 2018 - 10:44 am
LONDON (AP) — The British Parliament has released some 250 pages worth of documents that show Facebook considered charging developers for data access. Parliament's media committee seized confidential Facebook documents from the developer of a now-defunct bikini photo searching app as part of its...
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European Commissioner for Digital Single Market Andrus Ansip, left, and European Commissioner for Justice Vera Jourova participate in a media conference at EU headquarters in Brussels, Wednesday Dec. 5, 2018. The European Commission on Wednesday reported on an Action Plan to counter disinformation and the progress achieved so far. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)
December 05, 2018 - 10:44 am
BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union authorities want internet companies including Google, Facebook and Twitter to file monthly reports on their progress eradicating "fake news" campaigns allegedly backed by Russia from their platforms ahead of elections next year. Officials from the EU's executive...
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December 05, 2018 - 10:25 am
LONDON (AP) — The British Parliament has released some 250 pages worth of documents that show Facebook considered charging developers for data access. Parliament's media committee seized confidential Facebook documents from the developer of a now-defunct bikini photo searching app as part of its...
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FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2018, file photo, DJ Khaled presents a performance by Travis Scott and James Blake at the MTV Video Music Awards at Radio City Music Hall in New York. Federal regulators said Thursday, Nov. 29, that boxing legend Floyd Mayweather and music producer DJ Khaled are paying a total $750,000 to settle charges they failed to disclose payments they received for promoting investments in digital-currency securities. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)
November 29, 2018 - 8:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators said Thursday that boxing legend Floyd Mayweather and music producer DJ Khaled are paying a total $750,000 to settle charges they failed to disclose payments they received for promoting investments in digital-currency securities. The Securities and Exchange...
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November 29, 2018 - 8:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators said Thursday that boxing legend Floyd Mayweather and music producer DJ Khaled are paying a total $750,000 to settle charges they failed to disclose payments they received for promoting investments in digital-currency securities. The Securities and Exchange...
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