Office and commercial furniture and equipment

In this April 6, 2020 photo, a sign at The Anthem music venue reads "We'll Get Thru This" at the wharf which is almost completely empty because of the coronavirus outbreak in Washington. The coronavirus pandemic has gut-punched global markets, put 6.6 million Americans out of work and raised the strong likelihood of a recession. But in the Washington lobbying world, business is booming. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
April 07, 2020 - 3:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has gut-punched global markets, put 6.6 million Americans out of work and raised the strong likelihood of a recession. But in the Washington lobbying world, business is booming. Companies, interest groups and entire industries are seeking help from...
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In this May 19, 2011 photo, robots weld a Chevrolet Sonic at the General Motors Orion Assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich. General Motors, Ford, jet engine maker Rolls-Royce and other companies are talking to their governments about repurposing idled factories to produce vital goods to fight the coronavirus such as ventilators and surgical masks. On Friday, March 20, 2020 President Donald Trump invoked the Korean War-era Defense Production Act, allowing the government to marshal the private sector to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it allows the government to steer factories to overcome shortages, makers of heavy goods such as cars and trucks can't just flip a switch and produce something else. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
March 21, 2020 - 3:02 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Factories that crank out cars and trucks looking into making much-needed ventilators. Distilleries intended for whiskey and rum to instead turn out hand sanitizers and disinfectants. And an electronics maker that builds display screens repurposed for surgical masks. All are answering...
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A customer wearing a face mask and gloves goes shopping in the early morning in a supermarket in the Berlin district of Friedenau, Germany, Tuesday, March 17, 2020 In order to slow down the spread of the coronavirus, the German government has considerably restricted public life. Only for most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. (Kay Nietfeld/dpa via AP)
March 17, 2020 - 9:28 am
MADRID (AP) — The morning rush-hour scene at Madrid’s Atocha train station this week perfectly captured the dilemma facing Europe as it confronts the coronavirus. Governments have locked down commerce, beefed up health care measures and earmarked billions of euros into Europe's famed safety nets to...
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An avenue is seen empty in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, March 15, 2020. Spain's government announced Saturday that it is placing tight restrictions on movements and closing restaurants and other establishments in the nation of 46 million people as part of a two-week state of emergency to fight the sharp rise in coronavirus infections. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms. For some, it can cause more severe illness, especially in older adults and people with existing health problems. (AP Photo/Joan Mateu)
March 15, 2020 - 10:29 am
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — New travel restrictions and border closures reverberated across Europe and beyond Sunday as daily life increasingly ground to a halt amid efforts to keep people apart and slow the spread of the new coronavirus. Americans returning home faced chaos at the airports as...
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An avenue is seen empty in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, March 15, 2020. Spain's government announced Saturday that it is placing tight restrictions on movements and closing restaurants and other establishments in the nation of 46 million people as part of a two-week state of emergency to fight the sharp rise in coronavirus infections. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms. For some, it can cause more severe illness, especially in older adults and people with existing health problems. (AP Photo/Joan Mateu)
March 15, 2020 - 8:32 am
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A new round of restrictions and border closures was announced in Europe and beyond on Sunday as public life and travel increasingly ground to a halt and even worship was disrupted amid efforts to keep people apart and slow the spread of the new coronavirus. Spain awoke to...
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A volunteer sprays hydroalcoholic gel on a voter during the first round of the municipal elections, in Strasbourg, eastern France, Sunday March 15, 2020. The new virus has shuttered all schools, banished cheek-kissing and upended daily life across France, but President Emmanuel Macron won't let it disrupt democracy, so he's maintaining nationwide elections this weekend. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms. For some it can cause more severe illness. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)
March 15, 2020 - 8:22 am
PARIS (AP) — France is holding nationwide elections Sunday to choose all of its mayors and other local leaders despite a crackdown on public gatherings because of the new virus. Voting stations opened just as a drastic new order came into effect shutting down all of France's restaurants, museums,...
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Paris' incumbent mayor Anne Hidalgo casts her ballot for the first round of the French municipal elections, Sunday March 15, 2020 in Paris. The new virus has shuttered all schools, banished cheek-kissing and upended daily life across France, but President Emmanuel Macron won't let it disrupt democracy, so he's maintaining nationwide elections this weekend. (Eliot Blondet/Pool via AP)
March 15, 2020 - 5:29 am
PARIS (AP) — France is holding nationwide elections Sunday to choose all of its mayors and other local leaders despite a crackdown on public gatherings because of the new virus. Voting stations opened just as a drastic new order came into effect shutting down all of France's restaurants, museums,...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2019, file photo, Steve Marcinkus, an Investigator with the Office of the City Commissioners, demonstrates the ExpressVote XL voting machine at the Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia. Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. voters will cast ballots this year on devices that look and feel like the discredited paperless voting machines they once used, yet leave a paper record of the vote. Computer security experts are warning that these so-called ballot-marking devices pose too much of a risk. Ballot-marking machines were initially developed not as primary vote-casting tools but as “accessible” alternatives for the disabled. They print out paper records that are scanned by optical readers that tabulate the vote. They cost at least twice as much as hand-marked paper ballots, which computer scientists prefer because paper can’t be hacked. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
February 23, 2020 - 4:30 pm
In the rush to replace insecure, unreliable electronic voting machines after Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential race, state and local officials have scrambled to acquire more trustworthy equipment for this year’s election, when U.S. intelligence agencies fear even worse problems...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2019, file photo, Steve Marcinkus, an Investigator with the Office of the City Commissioners, demonstrates the ExpressVote XL voting machine at the Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia. Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. voters will cast ballots this year on devices that look and feel like the discredited paperless voting machines they once used, yet leave a paper record of the vote. Computer security experts are warning that these so-called ballot-marking devices pose too much of a risk. Ballot-marking machines were initially developed not as primary vote-casting tools but as “accessible” alternatives for the disabled. They print out paper records that are scanned by optical readers that tabulate the vote. They cost at least twice as much as hand-marked paper ballots, which computer scientists prefer because paper can’t be hacked. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
February 23, 2020 - 12:37 pm
In the rush to replace insecure, unreliable electronic voting machines after Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential race, state and local officials have scrambled to acquire more trustworthy equipment for this year’s election, when U.S. intelligence agencies fear even worse problems...
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FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2019, file photo, a digital voting machine sits on a table in Raleigh, N.C. North Carolina. In the rush to find reliable new voting machines, many state and local officials are turning to pricey models that some computer security experts see as risky. Called ballot-marking devices, the machines have touchscreens for registering voter choice. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed, File)
February 23, 2020 - 11:45 am
In the rush to replace insecure, unreliable electronic voting machines after Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential race, state and local officials have scrambled to acquire more trustworthy equipment for this year’s election, when U.S. intelligence agencies fear even worse problems...
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