Oceans

In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 1:10 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Climate warming is taking a toll on sea ice off Alaska’s northwest coast. Arctic scientists say the Chukchi (chuk-CHEE) Sea two decades ago would have been teeming with ice by early November. At the moment, it’s mostly ice-free. The Chukchi Sea in recent years has seen sea...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 10:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 9:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
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In this Sept. 4, 2009 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, corals are seen at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico during an expedition called Reefs, Rigs and Wrecks. Federal regulators are close to approving a protection plan for vulnerable corals in the Gulf of Mexico that would create new protected zones designed to allow the corals to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida (Dr. Ian MacDonald/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)
November 14, 2019 - 12:37 pm
A plan to protect corals in the Gulf of Mexico is close to becoming a law, drawing cheers from environmental groups who believe leaving the corals alone would help vulnerable ocean ecosystems to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi...
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In this Sept. 4, 2009 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, corals are seen at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico during an expedition called Reefs, Rigs and Wrecks. Federal regulators are close to approving a protection plan for vulnerable corals in the Gulf of Mexico that would create new protected zones designed to allow the corals to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida (Dr. Ian MacDonald/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)
November 14, 2019 - 12:33 pm
Federal regulators are close to approving a protection plan for vulnerable corals in the Gulf of Mexico that would create new protected zones designed to allow the corals to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida. Thirteen...
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A woman jumps over a puddle during cleaning following a flooding in Venice, Italy, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019. The worst flooding in Venice in more than 50 years has prompted calls to better protect the historic city from rising sea levels as officials calculated hundreds of millions of euros in damage. The water reached 1.87 meters above sea level Tuesday, the second-highest level ever recorded in the city. (Andrea Merola/ANSA via AP)
November 14, 2019 - 10:54 am
ROME (AP) — Italy's government is set to declare a state of emergency in flood-ravaged Venice, to swiftly secure the historic city funds to repair damage from the highest tide in 50 years. Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte described the flooding as "a blow to the heart of our country." He said a...
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People wade through water in a flooded St. Mark's Square in Venice, Italy, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. The high-water mark hit 187 centimeters (74 inches) late Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, meaning more than 85% of the city was flooded. The highest level ever recorded was 194 centimeters (76 inches) during infamous flooding in 1966. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 13, 2019 - 2:24 pm
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The worst flooding in Venice in more than 50 years prompted calls Wednesday to better protect the historic city from rising sea levels as officials calculated hundreds of millions of euros in damage. The water reached 1.87 meters (6.14 feet) above average sea level Tuesday, the...
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People wade through water in a flooded St. Mark's Square in Venice, Italy, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. The high-water mark hit 187 centimeters (74 inches) late Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, meaning more than 85% of the city was flooded. The highest level ever recorded was 194 centimeters (76 inches) during infamous flooding in 1966. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 13, 2019 - 11:05 am
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The worst flooding in Venice in more than 50 years prompted calls Wednesday to better protect the historic city from rising sea levels as officials calculated hundreds of millions of euros in damage. The water reached 1.87 meters (6.14 feet) above sea level Tuesday, the second-...
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A stranded ferry boat lies on its side, in Venice, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. The mayor of Venice is blaming climate change for flooding in the historic canal city that has reached the second-highest levels ever recorded, as another exceptional water level was recorded Wednesday. The high-water mark hit 187 centimeters (74 inches) late Tuesday, meaning more than 85% of the city was flooded. (AP Photo/Luigi Costantini)
November 13, 2019 - 9:10 am
MILAN (AP) — The worst flooding in Venice in more than 50 years prompted calls Wednesday to better protect the historic city from rising sea levels as officials calculated hundreds of millions of euros in damages. Water levels reached 187 centimeters (74 inches) Tuesday, the second-highest level...
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In this Oct. 22, 2019, photo, plastic and other marine debris sits on the beach on Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. In one of the most remote places on Earth, Midway Atoll is a wildlife sanctuary that should be a safe haven for seabirds and other marine animals. Instead, creatures here struggle to survive as their bellies fill with plastic from faraway places. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
November 07, 2019 - 1:50 pm
MIDWAY ATOLL, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (AP) — Flying into the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Midway Atoll appears out of the vast blue Pacific as a tiny oasis of coral-fringed land with pristine white sand beaches that are teeming with life. But on the ground, there's a different...
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