Oceans

Ashley Boudreaux ties sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 14, 2019 - 5:03 am
Hurricane Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at least...
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Ashley Boudreaux ties sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 13, 2019 - 10:03 pm
Hurricane Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at least...
Read More
Ashley Boudreaux ties sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 13, 2019 - 5:22 pm
Hurricane Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at least...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2017, file photo, residents move a "no wake," sign through flood waters caused by king tides in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Federal scientists, according to a report released Wednesday, July 10, 2019, predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 3:21 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The federal government is warning Americans to brace for a "floodier" future. Government scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year because of rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2017, file photo, residents move a "no wake," sign through flood waters caused by king tides in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Federal scientists, according to a report released Wednesday, July 10, 2019, predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 2:53 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Federal scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. A report released Wednesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2017, file photo, residents move a "no wake," sign through flood waters caused by king tides in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Federal scientists, according to a report released Wednesday, July 10, 2019, predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 12:15 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Federal scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year because of rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. A report released Wednesday by the National Oceanographic and...
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The German Arctic research vessel Polarstern is docked for maintenance in Bremerhaven, Germany, Wednesday, July 3, 2019. Scientists from 17 nations are preparing for a year-long mission to the central Arctic to study the impact that climate change is having on the frigid far north of the planet. Mission leader Markus Rex said that researchers plan to anchor the German icebreaker RV Polarstern to a large floe and set up camp on the ice as the sea freezes around them, conducting experiments throughout the Arctic winter. (AP Photos/Frank Jordans)
July 03, 2019 - 6:41 pm
BREMERHAVEN, Germany (AP) — Cranes hoist cargo onto the deck, power tools scream out and workers bustle through the maze of passageways inside the German icebreaker RV Polarstern, preparations for a yearlong voyage that organizers say is unprecedented in scale and ambition. In a couple of months,...
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The German Arctic research vessel Polarstern is docked for maintenance in Bremerhaven, Germany, Wednesday, July 3, 2019. Scientists from 17 nations are preparing for a year-long mission to the central Arctic to study the impact that climate change is having on the frigid far north of the planet. Mission leader Markus Rex said that researchers plan to anchor the German icebreaker RV Polarstern to a large floe and set up camp on the ice as the sea freezes around them, conducting experiments throughout the Arctic winter. (AP Photos/Frank Jordans)
July 03, 2019 - 5:38 pm
BREMERHAVEN, Germany (AP) — Cranes hoist cargo onto the deck, power tools scream out and workers bustle through the maze of passageways inside the German icebreaker RV Polarstern, preparations for a yearlong voyage that organizers say is unprecedented in scale and ambition. In a couple of months,...
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FILE - In this March 28, 2018, file photo, a North Atlantic right whale feeds on the surface of Cape Cod bay off the coast of Plymouth, Mass. Six of the endangered right whales died in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in June 2019, prompting scientists and conservationists to call for a swift response to protect the endangered species. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
July 03, 2019 - 2:42 pm
A half-dozen North Atlantic right whales have died in the past month, leading scientists, government officials and conservationists to call for a swift response to protect the endangered species. There are only a little more than 400 of the right whales left. All six of the dead whales have been...
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FILE - This May 24, 2006, file photo shows the village of Newtok, Alaska, where the eroding bank along the Ninglick River has long been a problem for the village, 480 miles west of Anchorage. Northern Alaska coastal communities and climate scientists say sea ice disappeared far earlier than normal this spring and it's affecting wildlife. The Anchorage Daily News reported in June 2019 that ice melted because of exceptionally warm ocean temperatures. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
June 30, 2019 - 8:50 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Sea ice along northern Alaska disappeared far earlier than normal this spring, alarming coastal residents who rely on wildlife and fish. Ice melted as a result of exceptionally warm ocean temperatures, the Anchorage Daily News reported . The early melting has been "crazy,"...
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