Oceanography

FILE - In this April 10, 1912 file photo the Titanic leaves Southampton, England on her maiden voyage. The salvage firm that has plucked artifacts from the sunken Titanic cruise ship over the decades is seeking a judge's permission to rescue more items from the rapidly deteriorating wreck. (AP Photo/File)
February 20, 2020 - 9:10 pm
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — The salvage firmthat hasplucked silverware, china and gold coins from the wreckage of the Titanic now wants to recover the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Machine that transmitted the doomed ship's increasingly frantic distress calls. Lawyers for the company, R.M.S. Titanic, Inc.,...
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In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)
February 05, 2020 - 12:37 pm
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in...
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In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)
February 05, 2020 - 2:25 am
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in...
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In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)
February 05, 2020 - 2:16 am
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in...
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FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Guy Runco, director of the Bird Treatment and Learning Center, releases a common murre near the Anchorage small boat harbor in Anchorage, Alaska. Hundreds of thousands of common murres, a fast-flying seabird, died from starvation four winters ago in the North Pacific, and a new research paper attempts to explain why. (AP Photo/Dan Joling, File)
January 15, 2020 - 2:06 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Common murres look like skinny penguins but fly like F-15 fighter jets. The North Pacific seabirds can quickly cover hundreds of miles searching for schools of small forage fish. Their powerful wings let them dive more than 150 feet (46 meters) under water to gorge on...
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This image released by Twentieth Century Fox shows Kristen Stewart in a scene from "Underwater." (Alan Markfield/Twentieth Century Fox via AP)
January 09, 2020 - 9:38 am
Welcome to January, which, in terms of quality movies, is the worst, the lowest, the abyss. Actually, that's pretty accurate when it comes to the latest, straight-to-January release “Underwater," which steals from “The Abyss” and many other movies like “Alien” and even “Godzilla.” The filmmakers...
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This image released by Twentieth Century Fox shows Kristen Stewart in a scene from "Underwater." (Alan Markfield/Twentieth Century Fox via AP)
January 08, 2020 - 6:41 pm
Welcome to January, which, in terms of quality movies, is the worst, the lowest, the abyss. Actually, that's pretty accurate when it comes to the latest, straight-to-January release “Underwater," which steals from “The Abyss” and many other movies like “Alien” and even “Godzilla.” The filmmakers...
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January 06, 2020 - 9:06 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A community in southern Thailand has offered a reward for catching whoever stole dozens of unhatched eggs of an endangered turtle species. The Pacific Leatherback turtle eggs were stolen before dawn Sunday from a beach in the southern province of Phang-nga, said Pratom Rassamee, head...
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This Dec. 3, 2019, photo, ecologist Nalini Nadkarni is shown in her lab on the University of Utah campus in Salt Lake City holding a Barbie created to look like her when she's climbing into the treetops to study the rainforest canopy. Nadkarni's childhood climbing trees shaped her career and now she's hoping she can get help kids interested in science in an new way: Barbies. Nadkarni has long created her own "treetop Barbies" and has now helped Mattel and National Geographic create a line of dolls with careers in science and conservation. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
December 30, 2019 - 2:03 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — When Nalini Nadkarni was a kid, she’d run home from school, climb into one of the eight maple trees in her parents’ backyard and spend an afternoon there with an apple and a book. That time in the treetops set the tone for the rest of her life: She’s now a forest ecologist at...
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In this March 2016 photo provided by The Island Institute, Bigelow Laboratory Research Associate Brittney Honisch measures a piece of sugar kelp before harvest in Casco Bay, Maine. A group of scientists with Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences and farmers in northern New England are working on a plan to feed seaweed to cows to gauge whether it can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. (Scott Sell/The Island Institute via AP)
December 29, 2019 - 10:28 am
FREEPORT, Maine (AP) — Coastal Maine has a lot of seaweed , and a fair number of cows. A group of scientists and farmers think that pairing the two could help unlock a way to cope with a warming world. The researchers — from a marine science lab, an agriculture center and universities in northern...
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