Nutrition

This undated photo provided by the National Institutes of Health in June 2019 shows an "ultra-processed" lunch including brand name macaroni and cheese, chicken tenders, canned green beans and diet lemonade. Researchers found people ate an average of 500 extra calories a day when fed mostly processed foods, compared with when the same people were fed minimally processed foods. That’s even though researchers tried to match the meals for nutrients like fat, fiber and sugar. (Paule Joseph, Shavonne Pocock/NIH via AP)
June 14, 2019 - 11:20 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Chips, soda and frozen pizzas tend to be full of salt, sugar and fat, but now scientists are trying to understand if there's something else about such processed foods that might be bad for us. Already, the spread of cheap, packaged foods has been linked to rising obesity rates...
Read More
This undated photo provided by the National Institutes of Health in June 2019 shows an "ultra-processed" lunch including brand name macaroni and cheese, chicken tenders, canned green beans and diet lemonade. Researchers found people ate an average of 500 extra calories a day when fed mostly processed foods, compared with when the same people were fed minimally processed foods. That’s even though researchers tried to match the meals for nutrients like fat, fiber and sugar. (Paule Joseph, Shavonne Pocock/NIH via AP)
June 14, 2019 - 10:41 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Chips, soda and frozen pizzas tend to be full of salt, sugar and fat, but now scientists are trying to understand if there's something else about such processed foods that might be bad for us. Already, the spread of cheap, packaged foods has been linked to rising obesity rates...
Read More
In this Thursday, May 30, 2019 photo, family Nurse Practitioner Serena Lopez exits an exam room at the new HealthHUB inside a CVS store in Spring, Texas. HealthHUB locations offer a broader range of health care services, new product categories, digital tools and on-demand health kiosks, trusted advice and personalized care. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
June 04, 2019 - 1:06 pm
Health care is moving closer to patients. Drugstores are expanding the care and support they offer, and telemedicine is bringing doctors and therapists to the family room couch as the system shifts to help people stay healthy and attract customers who want convenience. CVS Health offered the latest...
Read More
In this Thursday, May 30, 2019 photo, family Nurse Practitioner Serena Lopez exits an exam room at the new HealthHUB inside a CVS store in Spring, Texas. HealthHUB locations offer a broader range of health care services, new product categories, digital tools and on-demand health kiosks, trusted advice and personalized care. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
June 04, 2019 - 9:00 am
CVS Health is pushing deeper into health services with plans to add dietitians, medical equipment and space for the occasional yoga class to 1,500 stores over the next few years. The drugstore chain that quit selling tobacco several years ago said Tuesday it will expand a store model it recently...
Read More
FILE- In this Dec. 4, 2017, file photo, the CVS Health logo appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. CVS Health is pushing deeper into customer health again with plans to add dietitians, medical equipment and space for the occasional yoga class to 1,500 stores. The drugstore chain that quit selling tobacco several years ago said Tuesday, June 4, 2019, it will expand a store model it started testing recently. Its HealthHub stores will have around twice as much space devoted to health care as other locations and will aim to help people with chronic conditions like diabetes stay healthy. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
June 04, 2019 - 8:29 am
CVS Health is pushing deeper into health services with plans to add dietitians, medical equipment and space for the occasional yoga class to 1,500 stores over the next few years. The drugstore chain that quit selling tobacco several years ago said Tuesday it will expand a store model it recently...
Read More
FILE - This Friday, Jan. 26, 2018, file photo shows a CVS Pharmacy in Pittsburgh. CVS Health is pushing deeper into health services with plans to add dietitians, medical equipment and space for the occasional yoga class to 1,500 stores over the next few years, the chain announced Tuesday, June 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
June 04, 2019 - 6:56 am
CVS Health is pushing deeper into health services with plans to add dietitians, medical equipment and space for the occasional yoga class to 1,500 stores over the next few years. The drugstore chain that quit selling tobacco several years ago said Tuesday it will expand a store model it recently...
Read More
FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2015 file photo, Miranda Taylor, 20, poses for a portrait outside Christ College of Nursing and Health Science in Cincinnati. When she was 16 and weighed 265 pounds, she had obesity surgery. Taylor lost more than 100 pounds, along with severe depression, pre-diabetes and an obesity-related hormonal condition. "I feel awesome. It's like a new life," she says. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
May 16, 2019 - 12:13 pm
Teens who have obesity surgery lose as much weight as those who have the operation as adults and are more likely to have other health problems such as diabetes and high blood pressure go away, a study finds. The results suggest there's a benefit from not waiting to address obesity. Researchers say...
Read More
May 16, 2019 - 12:01 pm
Teens who have obesity surgery lose as much weight as those who have the operation as adults and are more likely to have other health problems such as diabetes and high blood pressure go away, a study finds. The results suggest there's a benefit from not waiting to address obesity. Researchers say...
Read More
May 16, 2019 - 11:55 am
A study finds that teens who have obesity surgery lose as much weight as adults who have the operation and are more likely to have other health problems go away. Doctors compared results of gastric bypass surgery in 161 teens and 396 adults who had been obese since they were teens. Five years after...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2014 file photo, produce is displayed for sale at a farmers market in Kalamazoo, Mich. A study released on Wednesday, May 15, 2019 suggests that trimming dietary fat and eating more fruits and vegetables may lower a woman's risk of dying of breast cancer. (Katie Alaimo/Kalamazoo Gazette via AP)
May 15, 2019 - 5:06 pm
For the first time, a large experiment suggests that trimming dietary fat and eating more fruits and vegetables may lower a woman's risk of dying of breast cancer. The results are notable because they come from a rigorous test involving 49,000 women over two decades rather than other studies that...
Read More

Pages