Newspapers

The logo of Australian Associated Press is seen in its Rhodes headquarters in Sydney, Tuesday, March 3, 2020. National news agency Australian Associated Press announced on Tuesday that it is closing after 85 years. (Danny Casey/AAP Image via AP)
March 03, 2020 - 1:46 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — National news agency Australian Associated Press said Tuesday it was closing after 85 years, blaming a decline in subscribers and free distribution of news content on digital platforms. "The saddest day: AAP closes after 85 years of excellence in journalism. The AAP...
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The logo of Australian Associated Press is seen in its Rhodes headquarters in Sydney, Tuesday, March 3, 2020. National news agency Australian Associated Press announced on Tuesday that it is closing after 85 years. (Danny Casey/AAP Image via AP)
March 03, 2020 - 12:52 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — National news agency Australian Associated Press said Tuesday it was closing after 85 years, blaming a decline in subscribers and digital platforms distributing news content for free. "The saddest day: AAP closes after 85 years of excellence in journalism. The AAP family...
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The logo of Australian Associated Press is seen in its Rhodes headquarters in Sydney, Tuesday, March 3, 2020. National news agency Australian Associated Press announced on Tuesday that it is closing after 85 years. (Danny Casey/AAP Image via AP)
March 02, 2020 - 11:01 pm
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — National news agency Australian Associated Press announced on Tuesday that it is closing after 85 years. AAP Editor-in-Chief Tony Gillies said in a tweet: “The saddest day: AAP closes after 85 years of excellence in journalism. The AAP family will be sorely missed.” APP...
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FILE - This Aug. 2, 2011 file photo shows MSNBC host Chris Matthews takes part in a panel discussion at the NBC Universal summer press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif. Matthews announced his retirement on his political talk show "Hardball with Chris Matthews" on Monday, March 2, 2020. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)
March 02, 2020 - 9:00 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Longtime MSNBC host Chris Matthews abruptly retired from his “Hardball” show on Monday, apologizing for making inappropriate comments about women and following a brutal week where he also took heat from supporters of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. His exit came after a weekend...
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FILE - This Aug. 2, 2011 file photo shows MSNBC host Chris Matthews takes part in a panel discussion at the NBC Universal summer press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif. Matthews announced his retirement on his political talk show "Hardball with Chris Matthews" on Monday, March 2, 2020. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)
March 02, 2020 - 8:38 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Longtime MSNBC host Chris Matthews abruptly retired from his “Hardball” show on Monday, apologizing for making inappropriate comments about women and following a brutal week where he also took heat from supporters of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. His exit came after a weekend...
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FILE - In this Feb. 29, 2020, file photo, a staff member blocks the view as a person is taken by a stretcher to a waiting ambulance from a nursing facility where more than 50 people are sick and being tested for the COVID-19 virus, in Kirkland, Wash. News organizations must walk a fine line in covering coronavirus. They need to convey the story's seriousness without provoking panic and report a flood of news while much remains a mystery. At the same time, they have to remind people who to stay safe and keep their own employees well. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
March 02, 2020 - 11:55 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Covering the coronavirus story requires careful navigation and constant attention. News organizations trying to responsibly report on the growing health crisis are confronted with the task of conveying its seriousness without provoking panic, keeping up with a torrent of information...
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FILE - In this Feb. 29, 2020, file photo, a staff member blocks the view as a person is taken by a stretcher to a waiting ambulance from a nursing facility where more than 50 people are sick and being tested for the COVID-19 virus, in Kirkland, Wash. News organizations must walk a fine line in covering coronavirus. They need to convey the story's seriousness without provoking panic and report a flood of news while much remains a mystery. At the same time, they have to remind people who to stay safe and keep their own employees well. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
March 02, 2020 - 2:40 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Covering the coronavirus story requires careful navigation and constant attention. News organizations trying to responsibly report on the growing health crisis are confronted with the task of conveying its seriousness without provoking panic, keeping up with a torrent of information...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 29, 2020, file photo, a staff member blocks the view as a person is taken by a stretcher to a waiting ambulance from a nursing facility where more than 50 people are sick and being tested for the COVID-19 virus, in Kirkland, Wash. News organizations must walk a fine line in covering coronavirus. They need to convey the story's seriousness without provoking panic and report a flood of news while much remains a mystery. At the same time, they have to remind people who to stay safe and keep their own employees well. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
March 02, 2020 - 2:21 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Covering the coronavirus story requires careful navigation and constant attention. News organizations trying to responsibly report on the growing health crisis are confronted with the task of conveying its seriousness without provoking panic, keeping up with a torrent of information...
Read More
March 02, 2020 - 2:15 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Covering the coronavirus story requires careful navigation and constant attention. News organizations trying to responsibly report on the growing health crisis are confronted with the task of conveying its seriousness without provoking panic, keeping up with a torrent of information...
Read More
In this Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020 photo, a photojournalist takes photographs of Indian paramilitary soldiers patrolling a street vandalized in Tuesday's violence in New Delhi, India. Reporting in India has never been without its risks, but journalists say attacks on the press during last week's deadly communal riots between Hindus and Muslims in New Delhi show the situation is deteriorating. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
March 01, 2020 - 7:33 pm
NEW DELHI (AP) — Reporting in India has never been without its risks, but journalists say attacks on the media during last week's deadly communal riots between Hindus and Muslims in New Delhi show the situation is deteriorating. One reporter was shot and survived, another had his teeth knocked out...
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