Newspapers

President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, April 22, 2019, during the annual White House Easter Egg Roll. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
April 23, 2019 - 5:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The guest list for the annual White House Correspondents' Association Dinner on Saturday will look a lot like it did in 2017: Neither President Donald Trump nor those who work for him plan to attend. Just four days before reporters and their guests were to gather at the event to...
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In this April 9, 2019, photo, Argus Leader investigative reporter Jonathan Ellis and news director Cory Myers in the newsroom in Sioux Falls, S.D. In 2010, reporters at South Dakota’s Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government’s food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead to a series of stories and help them identify possible fraud. But the government didn’t provide everything the paper wanted. Trying to get the data has taken the paper more than eight years and landed the case at the Supreme Court. (Briana Sanchez/The Argus Leader via AP)
April 22, 2019 - 2:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday seemed inclined to rule against a South Dakota newspaper seeking data about the government's food assistance program, previously known as food stamps. The high court was hearing arguments in a case originally brought by the Argus Leader newspaper, which...
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In this April 9, 2019, photo, Argus Leader investigative reporter Jonathan Ellis and news director Cory Myers in the newsroom in Sioux Falls, S.D. In 2010, reporters at South Dakota’s Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government’s food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead to a series of stories and help them identify possible fraud. But the government didn’t provide everything the paper wanted. Trying to get the data has taken the paper more than eight years and landed the case at the Supreme Court. (Briana Sanchez/The Argus Leader via AP)
April 20, 2019 - 4:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the summer of 2010, reporters at South Dakota's Argus Leader newspaper decided to request data about the government's food assistance program, previously known as food stamps. They thought the information could lead to a series of stories and potentially help them identify...
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In this April 9, 2019, photo, Argus Leader investigative reporter Jonathan Ellis and news director Cory Myers in the newsroom in Sioux Falls, S.D. In 2010, reporters at South Dakota’s Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government’s food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead to a series of stories and help them identify possible fraud. But the government didn’t provide everything the paper wanted. Trying to get the data has taken the paper more than eight years and landed the case at the Supreme Court. (Briana Sanchez/The Argus Leader via AP)
April 20, 2019 - 8:12 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the summer of 2010, reporters at South Dakota's Argus Leader newspaper decided to request data about the government's food assistance program, previously known as food stamps. They thought the information could lead to a series of stories and potentially help them identify...
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In this April 9, 2019, photo, Argus Leader investigative reporter Jonathan Ellis and news director Cory Myers in the newsroom in Sioux Falls, S.D. In 2010, reporters at South Dakota’s Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government’s food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead to a series of stories and help them identify possible fraud. But the government didn’t provide everything the paper wanted. Trying to get the data has taken the paper more than eight years and landed the case at the Supreme Court. (Briana Sanchez/The Argus Leader via AP)
April 20, 2019 - 8:11 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the summer of 2010, reporters at South Dakota's Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government's food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead...
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Special counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election as released on Thursday, April 18, 2019, is photographed in Washington. The section discusses Russian government links and contacts with the Trump campaign. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
April 18, 2019 - 8:41 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — With the Mueller Report finally out Thursday, at least in redacted form, publishers are hurrying to release book editions. Two Mueller Report books are in the top 15 on Amazon.com even though free pdfs are available online. The special prosecutor's findings, which run more than 400...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2019, file photo, Special Counsel Robert Mueller walks past the White House after attending services at St. John's Episcopal Church, in Washington. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
April 18, 2019 - 2:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Robert Mueller's 448-page investigative report into allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election includes 23 unredacted pages of Mueller's written questions and Donald Trump's written responses, the only direct exchange between the special counsel's office...
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This photo combination shows Associated Press journalists, from left, videographer Maad al-Zikry, reporter Maggie Michael and photographer Nariman El-Mofty. The team won the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in international reporting for their work documenting torture, graft and starvation in Yemen's brutal civil war. (AP Photo)
April 15, 2019 - 7:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A team of three Associated Press journalists won a Pulitzer Prize in international reporting Monday for their work documenting torture, graft and starvation in Yemen's brutal civil war. Reporter Maggie Michael, photographer Nariman El-Mofty and video journalist Maad al-Zikry spent a...
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Dana Canedy, the new administrator of The Pulitzer Prizes, make announcement of winners Monday April 15, 2019, in New York. A team of Associated Press journalists has won a Pulitzer Prize in international reporting for their work documenting torture, graft and starvation in Yemen's brutal civil war. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
April 15, 2019 - 6:59 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the Pulitzer Prizes (all times local): 7 p.m. Reuters' leaders say they're proud that the news service won Pulitzer Prizes for international reporting and breaking news photography, but they're dismayed that two reporters are in prison for their award-winning work...
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Staff of the South Florida Sun Sentinel celebrate their bittersweet honor Monday, April 15, 2019, in Deerfield Beach, Fla., after winning the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. The newspaper won for its coverage of the Parkland school shooting. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
April 15, 2019 - 6:10 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The South Florida Sun Sentinel and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette won Pulitzer Prizes on Monday and were recognized along with the Capital Gazette of Maryland for their coverage of the horrifying mass shootings in 2018 at a high school, a synagogue and a newsroom itself. The Associated...
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