Native Americans

In this June 25, 2019, photo, Marcella LeBeau, of the Two Kettles Band of the Lakotae, is photographed on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democratic presidential candidates will descend on Iowa next week to do something that Native Americans say doesn’t happen enough: Court their vote. At least seven White House hopefuls have said they’ll attend a forum in Sioux City on Monday and Tuesday named for longtime Native American activist Frank LaMere, who died in June. LeBeau, a 99-year-old registered Democrat, said that’s a change from the past when politicians largely overlooked Native issues. “We’re like a third-world country,” she said. “No one really listens to us.” (AP Photo/Kali Robinson)
August 17, 2019 - 6:28 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates will descend on Iowa next week to do something that Native Americans say doesn't happen enough: court their vote. At least seven White House hopefuls have said they'll attend a forum in Sioux City on Monday and Tuesday named for longtime Native...
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In this June 25, 2019, photo, Marcella LeBeau, of the Two Kettles Band of the Lakotae, is photographed on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democratic presidential candidates will descend on Iowa next week to do something that Native Americans say doesn’t happen enough: Court their vote. At least seven White House hopefuls have said they’ll attend a forum in Sioux City on Monday and Tuesday named for longtime Native American activist Frank LaMere, who died in June. LeBeau, a 99-year-old registered Democrat, said that’s a change from the past when politicians largely overlooked Native issues. “We’re like a third-world country,” she said. “No one really listens to us.” (AP Photo/Kali Robinson)
August 17, 2019 - 3:29 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates will descend on Iowa next week to do something that Native Americans say doesn't happen enough: court their vote. At least seven White House hopefuls have said they'll attend a forum in Sioux City on Monday and Tuesday named for longtime Native...
Read More
In this June 25, 2019, photo, Marcella LeBeau, of the Two Kettles Band of the Lakotae, is photographed on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democratic presidential candidates will descend on Iowa next week to do something that Native Americans say doesn’t happen enough: Court their vote. At least seven White House hopefuls have said they’ll attend a forum in Sioux City on Monday and Tuesday named for longtime Native American activist Frank LaMere, who died in June. LeBeau, a 99-year-old registered Democrat, said that’s a change from the past when politicians largely overlooked Native issues. “We’re like a third-world country,” she said. “No one really listens to us.” (AP Photo/Kali Robinson)
August 17, 2019 - 12:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates will descend on Iowa next week to do something that Native Americans say doesn't happen enough: court their vote. At least seven White House hopefuls have said they'll attend a forum in Sioux City on Monday and Tuesday named for longtime Native...
Read More
August 13, 2019 - 8:05 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A judge barred the Trump administration on Tuesday from acting on the recommendations of an energy advisory panel that was created to make it easier to extract fossil fuels from public lands and waters. U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy sided with a Montana-based conservation...
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People fill the main entryway of George Washington High School to view the controversial 13-panel, 1,600-square foot mural, the "Life of Washington," during an open house for the public Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019, in San Francisco. More than a 100 people packed the public high school to view a controversial mural criticized as racist and degrading for its depiction of black and Native American people. School officials opened the school Thursday to allow the viewing of the "Life of Washington" mural. The 83-year-old fresco is slated to be destroyed after the San Francisco School Board voted last month to paint over it. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
August 02, 2019 - 2:18 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Over 100 people packed the lobby of a San Francisco public high school to view a controversial mural criticized as racist and degrading for its depiction of black and Native American people. Officials allowed visitors to see the "Life of Washington" mural for two hours on...
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This image released by The WorkShop shows a scene from "Basketball or Nothing," a new docuseries that examines the hoops dreams of a rural, Arizona town in the heart of the Navajo Nation. The six-episode series debuts Friday on Netflix. (The WorkShop via AP)
August 01, 2019 - 3:41 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — High school basketball fans in Arizona and New Mexico likely know all about "rez ball" — a run-and-gun, pass-cut-and-shoot style of play popular in Native American communities. The style excites fans and allows teams without big centers to wear down opponents by running...
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FILE - In this May 13, 2019, file photo, a sign for Sonoita stands in the heart of southeastern Arizona where owners of wineries and other small tourism operations worry that the Rosemont Copper Mine proposed to be built in the nearby Santa Rita Mountains could harm their businesses with mining trucks rumbling down scenic state highway 83 that runs past the range. A federal judge on Wednesday, July 31, 2019, has overturned the U.S. Forest Service's approval of a Canadian company's planned new copper mine in southeastern Arizona. The judge ruled the agency improperly evaluated and considered water use issues associated with the Rosemont Mine planned in the Santa Rita Mountains on part of the Coronado National Forest. (AP Photo/Anita Snow, File)
August 01, 2019 - 11:50 am
PHOENIX (AP) — A federal judge has overturned the U.S. Forest Service's approval of plans for a new copper mine in southeastern Arizona in a decision that comes amid a larger battle across the West over the use of public lands for mining. The judge ruled late Wednesday that the agency improperly...
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FILE - This May 8, 2017, file photo, shows Arch Canyon within Bears Ears National Monument in Utah. The Bears Ears National Monument covers 315 square miles (816 square kilometers) of southeastern Utah lands considered sacred to Native Americans that are home to ancient cliff dwellings and other artifacts. President Barack Obama created the monument in 2016, and President Donald Trump downsized it a year later. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
July 26, 2019 - 7:05 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The U.S. government has decided to allow off-road vehicles access to archaeologically sensitive land at a Utah national monument that houses sacred tribal sites under a plan announced Friday. The Bureau of Land Management's plan for the Bears Ears National Monument says that...
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FILE - This May 8, 2017, file photo, shows Arch Canyon within Bears Ears National Monument in Utah. The Bears Ears National Monument covers 315 square miles (816 square kilometers) of southeastern Utah lands considered sacred to Native Americans that are home to ancient cliff dwellings and other artifacts. President Barack Obama created the monument in 2016, and President Donald Trump downsized it a year later. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
July 26, 2019 - 3:27 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The U.S. government has decided to allow off-road vehicles access to some archaeologically sensitive land at a Utah national monument that houses sacred tribal sites under a plan announced Friday. The Bureau of Land Management's plan for the Bears Ears National Monument says...
Read More
FILE - This May 8, 2017, file photo, shows Arch Canyon within Bears Ears National Monument in Utah. The Bears Ears National Monument covers 315 square miles (816 square kilometers) of southeastern Utah lands considered sacred to Native Americans that are home to ancient cliff dwellings and other artifacts. President Barack Obama created the monument in 2016, and President Donald Trump downsized it a year later. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
July 26, 2019 - 2:06 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The U.S. government has decided to allow off-road vehicles access to some archaeologically sensitive land at a Utah national monument that houses sacred tribal sites under a plan announced Friday. The Bureau of Land Management's plan for the Bears Ears National Monument says...
Read More

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