Native Americans

FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 8:02 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A ceremonial Native American shield has been welcomed back to New Mexico by tribal leaders, in the culmination of a yearslong international campaign to reclaim the sacred object that held a place in a cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from a mesa-top indigenous village...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 5:28 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A ceremonial Native American shield has been welcomed back to New Mexico by tribal leaders, in the culmination of a yearslong international campaign to reclaim the sacred object that held a place in a cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from a mesa-top indigenous village...
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This Aug. 19, 2019, image shows the coal-fired Navajo Generating Station near Page, Ariz. The power plant will close before the year ends, upending the lives of hundreds of mostly Native American workers who mined coal, loaded it and played a part in producing electricity that powered the American Southwest. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca)
November 18, 2019 - 4:20 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — A massive coal-fired power plant that served customers in the West for nearly 50 years shut down Monday, the latest closure in a shift away from coal and toward renewable energy and cheaper power. The Navajo Generating Station near the Arizona-Utah line was expected to...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 3:20 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A ceremonial Native American shield has been welcomed back to New Mexico by tribal leaders, in the culmination of a yearslong international campaign to reclaim the sacred object that held a place in a cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from a mesa-top indigenous village...
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November 18, 2019 - 2:16 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — In a story Nov. 14 about the Makah Tribe’s effort to resume whaling in Washington state, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the Makah is the only tribe with a treaty right to hunt whales. While the Makah is the only tribe whose treaty specifically mentions a right to hunt...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 10:34 am
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — When a ceremonial Native American shield was returned last week to New Mexico, tribal leaders were there to greet the sacred piece that held a place in their cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from their centuries-old, mesa-top village in the 1970s. Nearly four years ago...
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In this Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, photo, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1969 for his groundbreaking novel "House Made of Dawn," sits in his Santa Fe, N.M., home between writing sessions. In a rare interview with The Associated Press, the 85-year-old Native American author says he's excited about a new PBS American Masters documentary about his life. But he remains surprised and humbled that other writers have said his work has influenced them. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)
November 15, 2019 - 12:29 am
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1969 for his groundbreaking novel “House Made of Dawn,” said he’s not done writing and vows to finish his long-anticipated memoir. In a rare interview at his Santa Fe home, the 85-year-old author told The Associated...
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FILE - In this May 17, 1999, file photo, two Makah Indian whalers stand atop the carcass of a dead gray whale moments after helping tow it close to shore in the harbor at Neah Bay, Wash. Earlier in the day, Makah Indians hunted and killed the whale in their first successful hunt since voluntarily quitting whaling over 70 years earlier. Two decades after the Makah Indian tribe in the northwestern corner of Washington state conducted its last legal whale hunt from a hand-carved canoe, lawyers, government officials and animal rights activists will gather in a small hearing room in Seattle to determine whether the tribe will be allowed once again to harpoon gray whales as its people had done from time immemorial. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
November 14, 2019 - 7:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Patrick DePoe was in high school the last time his Native American tribe in Washington state was allowed to hunt whales. He was on a canoe that greeted the crew towing in the body of a gray whale. His shop class worked to clean the bones and reassemble the skeleton, which hangs in a...
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FILE - In this May 17, 1999, file photo, two Makah Indian whalers stand atop the carcass of a dead gray whale moments after helping tow it close to shore in the harbor at Neah Bay, Wash. Earlier in the day, Makah Indians hunted and killed the whale in their first successful hunt since voluntarily quitting whaling over 70 years earlier. Two decades after the Makah Indian tribe in the northwestern corner of Washington state conducted its last legal whale hunt from a hand-carved canoe, lawyers, government officials and animal rights activists will gather in a small hearing room in Seattle to determine whether the tribe will be allowed once again to harpoon gray whales as its people had done from time immemorial. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
November 14, 2019 - 5:04 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Patrick DePoe was in high school the last time his Native American tribe in Washington state was allowed to hunt whales. He was on a canoe that greeted the crew towing in the body of a gray whale. His shop class worked to clean the bones and reassemble the skeleton, which hangs in a...
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FILE - This Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019 image made available by NASA shows the Kuiper belt object originally called "Ultima Thule," about 1 billion miles beyond Pluto, encountered by the New Horizons spacecraft. On Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, NASA announced its official name "Arrokoth" which means "sky" in the language of the Native American Powhatan people.(NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute via AP, File)
November 12, 2019 - 9:11 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The most distant world ever explored 4 billion miles away finally has an official name: Arrokoth. That means "sky" in the language of the Native American Powhatan people, NASA said Tuesday. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year'...
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