National governments

FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2018 file photo, travelers check their phones at Indianapolis International Airport in Indianapolis. On Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, a federal court in Boston ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
November 12, 2019 - 4:51 pm
BOSTON (AP) — A federal court in Boston has ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment. Tuesday's ruling in U.S. District Court came in a lawsuit filed by the American...
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People rally outside the Supreme Court as oral arguments are heard in the case of President Trump's decision to end the Obama-era, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, at the Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
November 12, 2019 - 4:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sharply at odds with liberal justices, the Supreme Court's conservative majority seemed ready Tuesday to allow the Trump administration to abolish protections that permit 660,000 immigrants to work in the U.S., free from the threat of deportation. That outcome would "destroy lives...
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Attorney Cristobal Galindo, second from left, speaks accompanied by Jesus Hernandez, left, and Maria Guereca, and attorney Marion Reilly in front of the Supreme Court, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, in Washington, after oral arguments. The case involves U.S. border patrol agent Jesus Mesa, Jr., who fired at least two shots across the Mexican border, killing Sergio Adrian Hernandez Guereca, 15, who'd been playing in the concrete culvert between El Paso and Cuidad Juarez. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
November 12, 2019 - 3:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's left-leaning justices on Tuesday appeared willing to allow a lawsuit filed by the parents of a Mexican teenager shot over the border by an American agent, but the case will depend on whether they can persuade a conservative colleague to join them. The high...
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FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2011, file photo, U.S. District Judge Sul Ozerden is flanked by his father's, Halil's, naturalization certificate as he speaks during a naturalization ceremony in Gulfport, Miss. Ozerden, President Donald Trump’s nominee for a federal appeals court is in jeopardy following a conservative revolt from two Republican senators who have said publicly they won’t support him.(John Fitzhugh/The Sun Herald, via AP)
November 12, 2019 - 2:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee for a federal appeals court is in jeopardy following a conservative revolt from two Republican senators who have said publicly they won't support him. Trump nominated federal judge Halil "Sul" Ozerden of Mississippi to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of...
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Attorney Cristobal Galindo, second from left, speaks accompanied by Jesus Hernandez, left, and Maria Guereca, and attorney Marion Reilly in front of the Supreme Court, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, in Washington, after oral arguments. The case involves U.S. border patrol agent Jesus Mesa, Jr., who fired at least two shots across the Mexican border, killing Sergio Adrian Hernandez Guereca, 15, who'd been playing in the concrete culvert between El Paso and Cuidad Juarez. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
November 12, 2019 - 2:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's left-leaning justices on Tuesday appeared willing to allow a lawsuit filed by the parents of a Mexican teenager shot over the border by an American agent, but their case will depend on whether they can persuade a conservative colleague to join them. The high...
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A view of the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. Protections for 660,000 immigrants are on the line at the Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
November 12, 2019 - 1:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The fate of a lawsuit brought by the parents of a Mexican teenager shot to death across the U.S. border by an agent may rest on whether the family can convince a conservative Supreme Court justice to join them. The high court on Tuesday heard arguments in a 2010 case where Border...
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FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2011, file photo, U.S. District Judge Sul Ozerden is flanked by his father's, Halil's, naturalization certificate as he speaks during a naturalization ceremony in Gulfport, Miss. Ozerden, President Donald Trump’s nominee for a federal appeals court is in jeopardy following a conservative revolt from two Republican senators who have said publicly they won’t support him.(John Fitzhugh/The Sun Herald, via AP)
November 12, 2019 - 1:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee for a federal appeals court is in jeopardy following a conservative revolt from two Republican senators who have said publicly they won't support him. Trump nominated federal judge Halil "Sul" Ozerden of Mississippi to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of...
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November 12, 2019 - 1:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee for a federal appeals court is in jeopardy following a conservative revolt from two Republican senators who have said publicly they won't support him. Trump nominated federal judge Halil "Sul" Ozerden of Mississippi to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of...
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DACA recipients and others leave the Supreme Court with their hands in the air after oral arguments were heard in the case of President Trump's decision to end the Obama-era, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, at the Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
November 12, 2019 - 12:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's conservative majority seems prepared to allow the Trump administration to end a program that allows some immigrants to work legally in the United States and protects them from deportation. There did not appear to be any support among the five conservatives in...
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People rally outside the Supreme Court as oral arguments are heard in the case of President Trump's decision to end the Obama-era, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, at the Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
November 12, 2019 - 12:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's conservative majority seems prepared to allow the Trump administration to end a program that allows some immigrants to work legally in the United States and protects them from deportation. There did not appear to be any support among the five conservatives in...
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