MRSA

This 1971 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria, which causes the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. In a report released Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated about 36,000 Americans died from drug-resistant infections in 2017 _ down about 18% from an estimated 44,000 in 2013. Though deaths may be going down, non-fatal infections increased nationally from 2013 to 2017, from 2.6 million to 2.8 million. Dramatic increases in drug-resistant gonorrhea, urinary tract infections, and group A strep were largely to blame. (CDC via AP)
November 13, 2019 - 2:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Drug-resistant “superbug” infections have been called a developing nightmare that could set medicine back a century, making conquered germs once again untreatable. So there’s some surprising news in a report released Wednesday: U.S. superbug deaths appear to be going down. About 36,...
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In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo provided by Dr. Susan Huang of the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, researcher Raheeb Saavedra demonstrates how to use a medicated ointment for a study on preventing superbug infections. Hospitalized patients who harbor superbugs can cut their risk of developing full-blown infections if they swab medicated goo in their nose and use special soap and mouthwash for six months after going home, a study published on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019 finds. (Susan Huang via AP)
February 13, 2019 - 5:16 pm
Think of it as decontaminating yourself. Hospitalized patients who harbor certain superbugs can cut their risk of developing full-blown infections if they swab medicated goo in their nose and use special soap and mouthwash for six months after going home, a study found. It's a low-tech approach to...
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In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo provided by Dr. Susan Huang of the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, researcher Raheeb Saavedra demonstrates how to use a medicated ointment for a study on preventing superbug infections. Hospitalized patients who harbor superbugs can cut their risk of developing full-blown infections if they swab medicated goo in their nose and use special soap and mouthwash for six months after going home, a study published on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019 finds. (Susan Huang via AP)
February 13, 2019 - 5:04 pm
Think of it as decontaminating yourself. Hospitalized patients who harbor certain superbugs can cut their risk of developing full-blown infections if they swab medicated goo in their nose and use special soap and mouthwash for six months after going home, a study found. It's a low-tech approach to...
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In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo provided by Dr. Susan Huang of the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, researcher Raheeb Saavedra demonstrates how to use a medicated ointment for a study on preventing superbug infections. Hospitalized patients who harbor superbugs can cut their risk of developing full-blown infections if they swab medicated goo in their nose and use special soap and mouthwash for six months after going home, a study published on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019 finds. (Susan Huang via AP)
February 13, 2019 - 5:01 pm
A new study shows a way people can cut their risk of developing a dangerous superbug infection after leaving the hospital. Patients who were found to carry bacteria called MRSA on their skin or in their nose while in the hospital were less likely to develop a full-blown infection if they followed a...
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