Monkeys

In this Tuesday, March 31, 2020, photo, staff from the Pashupatinath Development Trust feed pigeons at Pashupatinath temple, the country's most revered Hindu temple, during the lockdown in Kathmandu, Nepal. Guards, staff and volunteers are making sure animals and birds on the temple grounds don't starve during the country's lockdown, which halted temple visits and stopped the crowds that used to line up to feed the animals. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)
April 13, 2020 - 9:39 am
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — When COVID-19 came to Nepal, attention turned to an unlikely group of victims: hundreds of monkeys, cows and pigeons. Normally, the animals are fed by thousands of devotees at the country’s most revered Hindu temple, Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu. But last month Nepal’s...
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In this undated photo provided by the California National Primate Research Center, rhesus monkeys are seen in their outdoor enclosure at the California National Primate Research Center in Davis, Calif. A group of the animals exposed to wildfire smoke as infants have developed lungs that are about 20 percent smaller than other rhesus monkeys. (CNPRC/Univeristy California Davis via AP)
January 09, 2020 - 9:42 am
PARADISE, Calif. (AP) — First came the flames, a raging firestorm propelled by 50 mph (80 kph) wind gusts that incinerated Kelsey Norton’s house and killed 85 people in her community. Then came the smoke — not just from the forest but also from 14,000 houses and their contents that burned,...
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In this undated photo provided by the California National Primate Research Center, rhesus monkeys are seen in their outdoor enclosure at the California National Primate Research Center in Davis, Calif. A group of the animals exposed to wildfire smoke as infants have developed lungs that are about 20 percent smaller than other rhesus monkeys. (CNPRC/Univeristy California Davis via AP)
January 09, 2020 - 9:06 am
PARADISE, Calif. (AP) — F irst came the flames, a raging firestorm propelled by 50-mile-per-hour winds gusts that incinerated Kelsey Norton’s house and killed 85 people in her community. Then came the smoke — not just from the forest but also from 14,000 houses and their contents that burned,...
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This image provided by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a collection of lung scans of 20 monkeys who were exposed to tuberculosis after receiving different forms of a TB vaccine. Monkeys in the top row received skin-deep shots, and those in the bottom row were given intravenous injections. The intravenous vaccine protected far better, as shown by TB-caused inflammation seen in red and yellow. (JoAnne Flynn, Alexander White and Pauline Maiello/Pitt; Mario Roederer/NIAID via AP)
January 01, 2020 - 1:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they’ve figured out how to make a century-old tuberculosis vaccine far more protective: Simply give the shot a different way. In a study with monkeys, injecting the vaccine straight into the bloodstream dramatically improved its effectiveness over today's skin-...
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Firefighters stand in front of the burning monkey house at Krefeld Zoo, in Krefeld, Germnay, Wednesday Jan 1, 2020. A fire at a zoo in western Germany killed a large number of animals in the early hours of the new year, authorities said. (Alexander Forstreuter/dpa via AP)
January 01, 2020 - 11:58 am
BERLIN (AP) — A fire raced through a zoo in western Germany in the first few minutes of the new year, killing more than 30 animals, including apes, monkeys, bats and birds, authorities said. Police said paper sky lanterns launched nearby to celebrate the arrival of 2020 were probably to blame...
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Firefighters stand in front of the burning monkey house at Krefeld Zoo, in Krefeld, Germnay, Wednesday Jan 1, 2020. A fire at a zoo in western Germany killed a large number of animals in the early hours of the new year, authorities said. (Alexander Forstreuter/dpa via AP)
January 01, 2020 - 7:36 am
BERLIN (AP) — A fire at a zoo in western Germany in the first minutes of 2020 killed more than 30 animals, including apes, monkeys, bats and birds, authorities said. Police said the fire may have been caused by sky lanterns launched to celebrate the new year. Several witnesses reported that they...
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FILE - In this June 18, 2019 file photo, Wayne Newton testifies in the trial of a man accused of burglarizing Newton's home, at the Regional Justice Center in Las Vegas. Newton is being sued by a Nevada woman claiming the entertainer's pet monkey bit and injured her daughter at his showpiece mansion in 2017. The lawsuit filed Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019, seeking at least $15,000 and filed by Jocelyne Urena says her daughter was attacked by the monkey during a tour of Newton's former estate home. Urena's attorney and Newton's representatives did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP, File)
August 08, 2019 - 8:01 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Entertainer Wayne Newton is being sued by a Las Vegas woman who claims the veteran crooner's pet monkey bit and injured her daughter during an invited visit to Newton's showpiece mansion nearly two years ago. Jocelyne Urena seeks at least $15,000 in damages on behalf of her...
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In this May 13, 2019, photo, Bella the vervet monkey looks at the camera at Primates Inc., in Westfield, Wis. Besides Bella, previously a pet, the sanctuary has five rhesus macaque monkeys that were previously used in medical research. More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years after research studies are done, according to sanctuaries and researchers. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
June 13, 2019 - 7:45 am
WESTFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined inside a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health. But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture outside,...
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In this May 13, 2019, photo, Bella the vervet monkey looks at the camera at Primates Inc., in Westfield, Wis. Besides Bella, previously a pet, the sanctuary has five rhesus macaque monkeys that were previously used in medical research. More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years after research studies are done, according to sanctuaries and researchers. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
June 13, 2019 - 3:37 am
WESTFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined to inside of a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health. But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture...
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This undated photo provided by the Oregon Health and Science University in March 2019 shows a baby monkey named Grady, at two weeks old, born from an experimental technology that aims to help young boys undergoing cancer treatment preserve their future fertility. Scientists froze testicular tissue from a monkey that had not yet reached puberty, and later thawed it to produce sperm used for Grady’s conception. (OHSU via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 2:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are closing in on a way to help young boys undergoing cancer treatment preserve their future fertility — and the proof is the first monkey born from the experimental technology. More and more people are surviving childhood cancer, but nearly 1 in 3 will be left...
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