Mining regulation

FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2010, file photo, the snowcapped Cabinet Mountains tower over the lush Kootenai River Valley outside of Libby, Mont. An Idaho mining company is asking a Montana judge to strike down its designation as a "bad actor" over past pollution, saying the label could stall two mines proposed beneath a wilderness area. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
April 12, 2018 - 7:52 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — An Idaho mining company went to court Thursday seeking to overturn its designation by Montana officials as an industry "bad actor" because of pollution tied to its CEO. Hecla Mining Co. asked a judge to block the Montana Department of Environmental Quality from suspending...
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FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2010, file photo, the snowcapped Cabinet Mountains tower over the lush Kootenai River Valley outside of Libby, Mont. An Idaho mining company is asking a Montana judge to strike down its designation as a "bad actor" over past pollution, saying the label could stall two mines proposed beneath a wilderness area. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
April 12, 2018 - 2:11 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — An Idaho mining company was due in a Montana courtroom on Thursday to challenge its designation by state officials as an industry "bad actor" because of pollution tied to its CEO. Hecla Mining Co. wants a judge to block the Montana Department of Environmental Quality from...
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March 30, 2018 - 6:56 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The head of an Idaho mining company says Montana officials appear to be trying to delay two mines proposed beneath a wilderness area, designating him a "bad actor" because of past pollution. Hecla Mining President Phillips S. Baker, Jr. told The Associated Press Friday the...
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March 09, 2018 - 7:39 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Mining industry groups are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review an Obama-era ban on new mining claims around the Grand Canyon. The petitions filed Friday by the National Mining Association and the American Exploration and Mining Association comes as President Donald Trump...
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Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican Senatorial candidate, Don Blankenship, speaks during a town hall to kick off his campaign in Logan, W.Va., Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018. Blankenship will face two other Republican candidates in the May 8th primary. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
January 18, 2018 - 9:39 pm
LOGAN, W.Va. (AP) — A former coal company CEO who went to prison for charges stemming from the deadliest U.S. mine disaster in decades kicked off his U.S. Senate campaigning Thursday, seeking to persuade a largely working class audience that he identified with them. But one father present whose son...
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FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2007 file photo, Robert "Bob" Murray, founder and chairman of Cleveland-based Murray Energy Corp., arrives at a news conference at the entrance to the Crandall Canyon Mine, in northwest of Huntington, Utah. In the early days of the Trump administration, Murray, the head of one of America’s largest coal companies sent a four-page “action plan” to the White House calling for rollbacks of key environmental and mine safety regulations he claimed would help revive the struggling mining industry. A review by The Associated Press of that March 1, 2017, plan shows Murray, an early Trump campaign supporter, has gotten about half the items on his wish list. Still others, such as eliminating federal tax credits for wind turbines and solar panels, failed to win approval in Congress. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
January 11, 2018 - 10:22 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the early days of the Trump administration, the head of one of America's largest coal companies sent a four-page "action plan" to the White House calling for rollbacks of Obama-era environmental and mine safety regulations. "We have listed our suggested actions in order of...
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FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2007 file photo, Robert "Bob" Murray, founder and chairman of Cleveland-based Murray Energy Corp., arrives at a news conference at the entrance to the Crandall Canyon Mine, in northwest of Huntington, Utah. In the early days of the Trump administration, Murray, the head of one of America’s largest coal companies sent a four-page “action plan” to the White House calling for rollbacks of key environmental and mine safety regulations he claimed would help revive the struggling mining industry. A review by The Associated Press of that March 1, 2017, plan shows Murray, an early Trump campaign supporter, has gotten about half the items on his wish list. Still others, such as eliminating federal tax credits for wind turbines and solar panels, failed to win approval in Congress. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
January 11, 2018 - 12:26 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the early days of the Trump administration, the head of one of America's largest coal companies sent a four-page "action plan" to the White House calling for rollbacks of Obama-era environmental and mine safety regulations. "We have listed our suggested actions in order of...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2007 file photo, Robert "Bob" Murray, founder and chairman of Cleveland-based Murray Energy Corp., arrives at a news conference at the entrance to the Crandall Canyon Mine, in northwest of Huntington, Utah. In the early days of the Trump administration, Murray, the head of one of America’s largest coal companies sent a four-page “action plan” to the White House calling for rollbacks of key environmental and mine safety regulations he claimed would help revive the struggling mining industry. A review by The Associated Press of that March 1, 2017, plan shows Murray, an early Trump campaign supporter, has gotten about half the items on his wish list. Still others, such as eliminating federal tax credits for wind turbines and solar panels, failed to win approval in Congress. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
January 11, 2018 - 12:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A coal company executive's "wish list" of actions that seek to roll back environmental and mine safety regulations has caught the eye of the Trump administration. A review of the memo by The Associated Press shows that the chairman and CEO of Ohio-based Murray Energy, Robert "Bob...
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FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2007 file photo, Robert "Bob" Murray, founder and chairman of Cleveland-based Murray Energy Corp., arrives at a news conference at the entrance to the Crandall Canyon Mine, in northwest of Huntington, Utah. In the early days of the Trump administration, Murray, the head of one of America’s largest coal companies sent a four-page “action plan” to the White House calling for rollbacks of key environmental and mine safety regulations he claimed would help revive the struggling mining industry. A review by The Associated Press of that March 1, 2017, plan shows Murray, an early Trump campaign supporter, has gotten about half the items on his wish list. Still others, such as eliminating federal tax credits for wind turbines and solar panels, failed to win approval in Congress. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
January 10, 2018 - 5:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the early days of the Trump administration, the head of one of America's largest coal companies sent a four-page "action plan" to the White House calling for rollbacks of Obama-era environmental and mine safety regulations. "We have listed our suggested actions in order of...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2007 file photo, Robert "Bob" Murray, founder and chairman of Cleveland-based Murray Energy Corp., arrives at a news conference at the entrance to the Crandall Canyon Mine, in northwest of Huntington, Utah. In the early days of the Trump administration, Murray, the head of one of America’s largest coal companies sent a four-page “action plan” to the White House calling for rollbacks of key environmental and mine safety regulations he claimed would help revive the struggling mining industry. A review by The Associated Press of that March 1, 2017, plan shows Murray, an early Trump campaign supporter, has gotten about half the items on his wish list. Still others, such as eliminating federal tax credits for wind turbines and solar panels, failed to win approval in Congress. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
January 10, 2018 - 5:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the early days of the Trump administration, the head of one of America's largest coal companies sent a four-page "action plan" to the White House calling for rollbacks of Obama-era environmental and mine safety regulations. "We have listed our suggested actions in order of...
Read More

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