Military recruitment

FILE - In this July 3, 2018, file photo, a Pakistani recruit, 22, who was recently discharged from the U.S. Army, holds an American flag as he poses for a picture. The U.S. Army has stopped discharging immigrant recruits who enlisted seeking a path to citizenship - at least temporarily. A memo shared with The Associated Press on Wednesday, Aug. 8 and dated July 20 spells out orders to high-ranking Army officials to stop processing discharges of men and women who enlisted in the special immigrant program, effective immediately. (AP Photo/Mike Knaak, File)
August 09, 2018 - 1:04 am
The U.S. Army has stopped discharging immigrant recruits who enlisted seeking a path to citizenship — at least temporarily. A memo shared with The Associated Press on Wednesday and dated July 20 spells out orders to high-ranking Army officials to stop processing discharges of men and women who...
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August 09, 2018 - 12:50 am
The U.S. Army has stopped discharging immigrant recruits who enlisted seeking a path to citizenship — at least temporarily. A memo shared with The Associated Press on Wednesday and dated July 20 spells out orders to high-ranking Army officials to stop processing discharges of men and women who...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2016, file photo, Army drill sergeants stand over recruits during a live-fire marksmanship training course at Fort Jackson, S.C. Under the gun to increase the size of the force, the Army is pouring an extra $200 million into bonuses this year to attract and retain soldiers, and has approved more drug use and conduct waivers for recruits in order to build the ranks. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
August 01, 2018 - 3:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Under the gun to increase the size of the force, the Army is issuing more waivers for past drug use or bad conduct by recruits, and pouring an extra $200 million into bonuses this year to attract and retain soldiers. According to data obtained by The Associated Press, nearly one-...
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FILE--This undated file photo provided by the Calixto family shows Lucas Calixto. The U.S. Army has reversed its decision to discharge an immigrant recruit who was booted from the military after enlisting with a promised path to citizenship. (Courtesy of the Calixto Family via AP, file)
July 17, 2018 - 7:03 pm
The U.S. Army has reversed its decision to discharge an immigrant reservist who sued when he was booted from the military last month after enlisting with a promised path to citizenship, according to court filings and his attorney. Brazilian immigrant Lucas Calixto filed a lawsuit against the Army...
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July 17, 2018 - 5:08 pm
The U.S. Army has reversed its decision to discharge an immigrant recruit who sued when he was booted from the military last month after enlisting with a promised path to citizenship, according to court filings and his attorney. Brazilian immigrant Lucas Calixto filed a lawsuit against the Army in...
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FILE - In this April 9, 2003, file photo, relatives of Guatemalan born Marine Lance Cpl. Jose Antonio Gutierrez, one of the first combat casualties of the Iraq War, gather around his coffin at his funeral at Los Cipreses cemetery in Guatemala City. The Guatemalan-born Gutierrez, who entered to U.S. illegally as an orphan teen, was killed in battle around the port city of Umm Qasr. Hundreds attended his memorial service outside of Los Angeles. He was granted American citizenship posthumously. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo, File)
July 15, 2018 - 12:01 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Some immigrant U.S. Army reservists and recruits who enlisted in the military with a promised path to citizenship are being abruptly discharged . A few said the Army informed them they had been labeled as security risks because they have relatives abroad or because the...
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This photo provided by Panshu Zhao shows Zhao in uniform on Feb. 11, 2018 at a U.S. Army Reserve installation in Houston. Zhao is one of dozens, if not more, devastated immigrant military recruits and reservists struggling this summer with abrupt and often inexplicable discharges and cancelled contracts. They enlisted with a promised path to citizenship in exchange for being willing to risk their lives for the U.S., a timeworn exchange that’s added linguists, medical specialists and others to the military since the Revolutionary War. “It’s just like you’re dropped from heaven to hell,” Zhao told the Associated Press on Friday, July 6, 2018. (Panshu Zhao via AP)
July 07, 2018 - 6:19 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Growing up in eastern China, Panshu Zhao fell in love with America. He read the Bible his parents gave him, watched Hollywood movies and studied the ideals of democracy. He jumped at the chance to attend graduate school at Texas A&M University. In 2016, Zhao enlisted in the...
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This photo provided by Panshu Zhao shows Zhao in uniform on Feb. 11, 2018 at a U.S. Army Reserve installation in Houston. Zhao is one of dozens, if not more, devastated immigrant military recruits and reservists struggling this summer with abrupt and often inexplicable discharges and cancelled contracts. They enlisted with a promised path to citizenship in exchange for being willing to risk their lives for the U.S., a timeworn exchange that’s added linguists, medical specialists and others to the military since the Revolutionary War. “It’s just like you’re dropped from heaven to hell,” Zhao told the Associated Press on Friday, July 6, 2018. (Panshu Zhao via AP)
July 06, 2018 - 11:33 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Growing up in eastern China, Panshu Zhao fell in love with America. He read the Bible his parents gave him, watched Hollywood movies and studied the ideals of democracy. He jumped at the chance to attend graduate school at Texas A&M University. In 2016, Zhao enlisted in the...
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In this Tuesday, July 3, 2018, photo, a Pakistani recruit, 22, who was recently discharged from the U.S. Army, holds an American flag as he poses for a picture. The man asked his name and location to be undisclosed for safety reasons. The AP interviewed three recruits from Brazil, Pakistan and Iran, all of whom said they were devastated by their unexpected discharges. (AP Photo/Mike Knaak)
July 06, 2018 - 7:22 am
SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Some immigrant U.S. Army reservists and recruits who enlisted in the military with a promised path to citizenship are being abruptly discharged, the Associated Press has learned. The AP was unable to quantify how many men and women who enlisted through the special recruitment...
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In this Tuesday, July 3, 2018, photo, a Pakistani recruit, 22, who was recently discharged from the U.S. Army, holds an American flag as he poses for a picture. The man asked his name and location to be undisclosed for safety reasons. The AP interviewed three recruits from Brazil, Pakistan and Iran, all of whom said they were devastated by their unexpected discharges. (AP Photo/Mike Knaak)
July 06, 2018 - 4:56 am
SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Some immigrant U.S. Army reservists and recruits who enlisted in the military with a promised path to citizenship are being abruptly discharged, the Associated Press has learned. The AP was unable to quantify how many men and women who enlisted through the special recruitment...
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