Military intelligence

FILE - In this July 30, 2019 file photo, award-winning journalist Glenn Greenwald listens to a question during a press conference before the start of a protest in his support in front of the headquarters of the Brazilian Press Association, known as ABI, in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Greenwald is working on a book about his reporting on corruption in Brazilian politics that led to threats of retaliation from the government of President Jair Bolsonaro. The book is tentatively titled “You Can't Silence This” and is scheduled for 2021, Henry Holt and Company announced Tuesday, March 30, 2020. (AP Photo/Ricardo Borges, File)
March 10, 2020 - 8:33 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Award-winning journalist Glenn Greenwald is working on a book about his reporting on corruption in Brazilian politics that led to threats of retaliation from the government of President Jair Bolsonaro. The book is tentatively titled “You Can't Silence This” and is scheduled for 2021...
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March 04, 2020 - 1:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Defense Department contract linguist has been charged with giving classified information, including the names of American intelligence assets, to a Lebanese national with ties to the militant group Hezbollah, the Justice Department announced Wednesday. Federal prosecutors...
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March 04, 2020 - 1:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Defense Department contract linguist has been charged with giving classified information, including the names of American intelligence assets, to a Lebanese national with ties to Hezbollah, the Justice Department announced Wednesday. Federal prosecutors accused Mariam Taha...
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Supporters of Julian Assange hold placards as they protest on the second day of a week of opening arguments for the extradition of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange outside Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in south east London, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020. U.S. authorities, want to try Assange on espionage charges. A lawyer for the Americans said the Australian computer expert was an “ordinary” criminal whose publication of hundreds of thousands of secret military documents put many people at risk of torture and death. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
February 26, 2020 - 12:32 pm
LONDON (AP) — A lawyer for Julian Assange argued Wednesday that the WikiLeaks founder should not be sent to the United States because a U.K.-U.S. treaty bans extradition for political offenses. Assange, 48, is wanted in the U.S. on spying charges over the leaking of classified government documents...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
February 24, 2020 - 9:05 am
LONDON (AP) — The U.S. government began outlining its extradition case against Julian Assange in a London court on Monday, arguing that the WikiLeaks founder is not a free-speech champion but an “ordinary” criminal who put many lives at risk with his secret-spilling. U.S. authorities want to try...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
February 24, 2020 - 8:36 am
LONDON (AP) — The U.S. government began outlining its extradition case against Julian Assange in a London court on Monday, arguing that the WikiLeaks founder is not a free-speech champion but an “ordinary” criminal who put many lives at risk with his secret-spilling. U.S. authorities want to try...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
February 24, 2020 - 7:31 am
LONDON (AP) — The U.S. government began outlining its extradition case against Julian Assange in a London court on Monday, arguing that the WikiLeaks founder is not a free-speech champion but an “ordinary” criminal who put many lives at risk with his secret-spilling. U.S. authorities want to try...
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Supporters hold a banner which reads 'Free Assange' as they protest against the extradition of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange outside Belmarsh Magistrates Court in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
February 24, 2020 - 6:37 am
LONDON (AP) — The U.S. government began outlining its extradition case against Julian Assange in a London court on Monday, arguing that the WikiLeaks founder is not a free-speech champion but an “ordinary” criminal who put many lives at risk with his secret-spilling. U.S. authorities want to try...
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Supporters hold a banner which reads 'Free Assange' as they protest against the extradition of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange outside Belmarsh Magistrates Court in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
February 24, 2020 - 5:53 am
LONDON (AP) — Supporters of Julian Assange gathered Monday outside a high-security London courthouse, where a judge opened a hearing into a U.S. extradition case against the WikiLeaks founder. The courtroom showdown comes a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American authorities by publishing a...
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Supporters hold a banner which reads 'Free Assange' as they protest against the extradition of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange outside Belmarsh Magistrates Court in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
February 24, 2020 - 5:39 am
LONDON (AP) — Supporters of Julian Assange gathered Monday outside a high-security London courthouse, where a judge is set to begin hearing a U.S. extradition case against the WikiLeaks founder. The courtroom showdown comes a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American authorities by publishing a...
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