Medical schools

In this 1915-1923 photo made available by the Library of Congress, a doctor examines a child with a stethoscope, accompanied by a nurse, in the United States. Two centuries after its invention, the stethoscope _ the very symbol of the medical profession _ is facing an uncertain prognosis. It is threatened by hand-held devices that are also pressed against the chest but rely on ultrasound technology, artificial intelligence and smartphone apps instead of doctors’ ears to help detect leaks, murmurs, abnormal rhythms and other problems in the heart, lungs and elsewhere. (Harris & Ewing/Library of Congress via AP)
October 23, 2019 - 10:21 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Two centuries after its invention, the stethoscope — the very symbol of the medical profession — is facing an uncertain prognosis. It is threatened by hand-held devices that are also pressed against the chest but rely on ultrasound technology, artificial intelligence and smartphone...
Read More
South Korean Justice Minister Cho Kuk, center, leaves the Gwacheon Government Complex in Gwacheon, South Korea, Monday, Oct. 14, 2019. Cho on Monday offered to step down amid an investigation into allegations of financial crimes and academic favors surrounding his family, a scandal that has rocked Seoul's liberal government and deeply polarized national opinion. (Ryu Hyung-suck/Yonhap via AP)
October 20, 2019 - 11:37 pm
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Prosecutors said Monday they are seeking to arrest the wife of South Korea's former justice minister, who resigned last week amid allegations of financial crimes and academic fraud surrounding his family that sparked huge protests and dented the popularity of President...
Read More
Professor Gregg Semenza, accompanied by Johns Hopkins University President Ron Daniels, waves to the crowd during a news conference after he was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine Hospital in Baltimore, Md., Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. The 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine has been jointly awarded to William Kaelin Jr., Sir Peter Ratcliffe and Gregg Semenza for their pioneering research into how human cells respond to changing oxygen levels. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
October 07, 2019 - 8:35 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Two Americans and a British scientist won a Nobel Prize on Monday for discovering details of how the body's cells sense and react to low oxygen levels, providing a foothold for developing new treatments for anemia, cancer and other diseases. Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. of Harvard...
Read More
Professor Randall Johnson of the Nobel Commitee, right, speaks during a news conference in Stockholm, Sweden, Monday Oct. 7, 2019. The 2019 Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to scientists Gregg L. Semenza, Peter J. Ratcliffe and William G. Kaelin Jr. receiving the award jointly for their discoveries of "how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability". (Pontus Lundahl/TT via AP)
October 07, 2019 - 7:09 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (all times local): 1:05 p.m. The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is celebrating one of its top researchers, Dr. Gregg Semenza, who shares this year's Nobel Prize for medicine for his work on how genes respond to...
Read More
In this Aug. 2, 2018 file photo provided by Dawn Manteufel, Greg Manteufel lays in his hospital bed at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. He lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip from capnocytophaga, a bacteria commonly found in the saliva or cats and dogs which almost never leads to people getting sick, unless the person has a compromised immune system. Manteufel was perfectly healthy when he got sick in June of 2018. Over the last seven years, a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, connected to Harvard Medical School, have tested other healthy people who were affected and developed a theory on why they were affected- a gene change in all the victims. (Dawn Manteufel via AP)
September 27, 2019 - 10:24 pm
WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) — It's hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she's there next to him, knowing he'll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. "We...
Read More
In this Aug. 2, 2018 file photo provided by Dawn Manteufel, Greg Manteufel lays in his hospital bed at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. He lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip from capnocytophaga, a bacteria commonly found in the saliva or cats and dogs which almost never leads to people getting sick, unless the person has a compromised immune system. Manteufel was perfectly healthy when he got sick in June of 2018. Over the last seven years, a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, connected to Harvard Medical School, have tested other healthy people who were affected and developed a theory on why they were affected- a gene change in all the victims. (Dawn Manteufel via AP)
September 27, 2019 - 2:12 pm
WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) — It's hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she's there next to him, knowing he'll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. "We...
Read More
In this Aug. 2, 2018 file photo provided by Dawn Manteufel, Greg Manteufel lays in his hospital bed at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. He lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip from capnocytophaga, a bacteria commonly found in the saliva or cats and dogs which almost never leads to people getting sick, unless the person has a compromised immune system. Manteufel was perfectly healthy when he got sick in June of 2018. Over the last seven years, a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, connected to Harvard Medical School, have tested other healthy people who were affected and developed a theory on why they were affected- a gene change in all the victims. (Dawn Manteufel via AP)
September 27, 2019 - 10:25 am
WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) — It's hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she's there next to him, knowing he'll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. "We...
Read More
In this Aug. 2, 2018 file photo provided by Dawn Manteufel, Greg Manteufel lays in his hospital bed at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. He lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip from capnocytophaga, a bacteria commonly found in the saliva or cats and dogs which almost never leads to people getting sick, unless the person has a compromised immune system. Manteufel was perfectly healthy when he got sick in June of 2018. Over the last seven years, a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, connected to Harvard Medical School, have tested other healthy people who were affected and developed a theory on why they were affected- a gene change in all the victims. (Dawn Manteufel via AP)
September 27, 2019 - 8:05 am
WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) — It's hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she's there next to him, knowing he'll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. "We...
Read More
In this Aug. 2, 2018 file photo provided by Dawn Manteufel, Greg Manteufel lays in his hospital bed at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. He lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip from capnocytophaga, a bacteria commonly found in the saliva or cats and dogs which almost never leads to people getting sick, unless the person has a compromised immune system. Manteufel was perfectly healthy when he got sick in June of 2018. Over the last seven years, a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, connected to Harvard Medical School, have tested other healthy people who were affected and developed a theory on why they were affected- a gene change in all the victims. (Dawn Manteufel via AP)
September 27, 2019 - 7:57 am
WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) — It's hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she's there next to him, knowing he'll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. "We...
Read More
In this Aug. 2, 2018 file photo provided by Dawn Manteufel, Greg Manteufel lays in his hospital bed at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. He lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip from capnocytophaga, a bacteria commonly found in the saliva or cats and dogs which almost never leads to people getting sick, unless the person has a compromised immune system. Manteufel was perfectly healthy when he got sick in June of 2018. Over the last seven years, a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, connected to Harvard Medical School, have tested other healthy people who were affected and developed a theory on why they were affected- a gene change in all the victims. (Dawn Manteufel via AP)
September 27, 2019 - 5:33 am
WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) — It's hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she's there next to him, knowing he'll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. "We...
Read More

Pages