Medical research

This 1966 image made available by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention shows a chest x-ray of a tuberculosis patient. According to results reported Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019 at a conference in India and published by the New England Journal of Medicine, an experimental vaccine has proved 50% effective at preventing latent tuberculosis infection from turning into active disease in a three-year study of adults in Africa. (CDC via AP)
October 29, 2019 - 6:43 am
An experimental vaccine proved 50% effective at preventing latent tuberculosis infection from turning into active disease in a three-year study of adults in Africa. Doctors were encouraged because protection declined only a little after two years, and even a partially effective vaccine would be a...
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FILE - This undated photo provided by the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office shows Stephen Gore, the owner of a now-closed Phoenix body donation facility who in 2015 pleaded guilty to a felony charge for his role in mishandling donations of human remains. Lawyers are scheduled to make opening statements Monday, Oct. 28, 2019, at a civil trial against Gore's company for allegedly mishandling donated bodies. (Maricopa County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
October 28, 2019 - 7:46 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A retired FBI agent described a horrific raid of now-closed body donation facility Monday, recalling a table stacked with severed human legs, heads stuffed in a cooler, and torsos without heads and limbs. Mark Cwynar testified on the opening day of a civil trial that one torso had...
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FILE - This undated photo provided by the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office shows Stephen Gore, the owner of a now-closed Phoenix body donation facility who in 2015 pleaded guilty to a felony charge for his role in mishandling donations of human remains. Lawyers are scheduled to make opening statements Monday, Oct. 28, 2019, at a civil trial against Gore's company for allegedly mishandling donated bodies. (Maricopa County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
October 28, 2019 - 6:55 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A retired FBI agent described a horrific raid of now-closed body donation facility Monday, recalling a table stacked with severed human legs, heads stuffed in a cooler, and torsos without heads and limbs. Mark Cwynar testified on the opening day of a civil trial that one torso had...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2018 file photo, Dr. William Burke goes over a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen Inc. says it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia. The announcement Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019, is a surprise because the company earlier this year stopped two studies of the drug, called aducanumab, after partial results suggested it was not working. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
October 22, 2019 - 6:44 pm
Biogen Inc. said Tuesday it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia. The announcement was a surprise because the drug company earlier this year stopped two...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2018 file photo, Dr. William Burke goes over a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen Inc. says it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia. The announcement Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019, is a surprise because the company earlier this year stopped two studies of the drug, called aducanumab, after partial results suggested it was not working. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
October 22, 2019 - 4:13 pm
Biogen Inc. said Tuesday it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia. The announcement was a surprise because the drug company earlier this year stopped two...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2018 file photo, Dr. William Burke goes over a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen Inc. says it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia. The announcement Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019, is a surprise because the company earlier this year stopped two studies of the drug, called aducanumab, after partial results suggested it was not working. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
October 22, 2019 - 10:40 am
The drug company Biogen Inc. said Tuesday it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia. The announcement was a surprise because the company earlier this year...
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FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2019, file image taken with a slow shutter speed a soccer player runs for the ball during the Euro 2020 group A qualifying soccer match in Prague, Czech Republic. A study, from the University of Glasgow and reported Monday, Oct. 21, in New England Journal of Medicine, of former professional soccer players in Scotland found that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek, File)
October 21, 2019 - 12:53 pm
LONDON (AP) — A study of former professional soccer players in Scotland finds that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. The results raise fresh concerns about head-related risks from...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
October 21, 2019 - 11:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The poliolike syndrome, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, is very rare. Since the first reports from California in...
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FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2019, file image taken with a slow shutter speed a soccer player runs for the ball during the Euro 2020 group A qualifying soccer match in Prague, Czech Republic. A study, from the University of Glasgow and reported Monday, Oct. 21, in New England Journal of Medicine, of former professional soccer players in Scotland found that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek, File)
October 21, 2019 - 11:28 am
A study of former professional soccer players in Scotland finds that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. The results raise fresh concerns about head-related risks from playing the...
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A firefighter walks near the entrance to NuStar Energy fuel storage facility Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019 after a Tuesday fire in Crockett, Calif. Officials were trying to determine Wednesday if a 4.5 magnitude earthquake triggered an explosion at a fuel storage facility in the San Francisco Bay Area that started a fire and trapped thousands in their homes for hours because of potentially unhealthy air. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
October 16, 2019 - 8:20 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Officials were trying to determine Wednesday if a 4.5 magnitude earthquake triggered an explosion at a fuel storage facility in the San Francisco Bay Area that started a fire and kept thousands of people in their homes for hours because of potentially unhealthy air. The...
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