Medical research

FILE - In this March 19, 2015, file photo, a thick haze of smog looms over the skyline of Chicago. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that America’s nitrogen oxides levels, a key ingredient in smog, aren’t falling as fast as they used to and may be leveling off. The Monday, April 30, 2018, study means that when tighter new air quality standards go into effect later this fall, more cities may find themselves on federal's dirty air list. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
April 30, 2018 - 3:07 pm
DENVER (AP) — For decades America's air was getting cleaner as levels of a key smog ingredient steadily dropped. That changed about seven years ago when pollution reductions leveled off, a new study found. This means when tighter federal air quality standards go into effect later this year, many...
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CORRECTS LOCATION TO WHITEHOUSE, NOT SWANTON - This March 2017 photo provided by Heidi Bisbee shows Carly Kudzia, 7, with her mother, Heather Unsinger, in Whitehouse, Ohio. Carly participated in a study suggesting that the drug lonafarnib may extend life for children with progeria, a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging. Other kids "always think I'm a baby," Carly says. But "I'm a regular kid." (Heidi Bisbee via AP)
April 24, 2018 - 3:47 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Children with a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging and early death may live longer if treated with an experimental drug first developed for cancer patients, a study suggests. The small, preliminary study isn't proof the drug works and it found only a small benefit:...
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CORRECTS LOCATION TO WHITEHOUSE, NOT SWANTON - This March 2017 photo provided by Heidi Bisbee shows Carly Kudzia, 7, with her mother, Heather Unsinger, in Whitehouse, Ohio. Carly participated in a study suggesting that the drug lonafarnib may extend life for children with progeria, a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging. Other kids "always think I'm a baby," Carly says. But "I'm a regular kid." (Heidi Bisbee via AP)
April 24, 2018 - 11:17 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Children with a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging and early death may live longer if treated with an experimental drug first developed for cancer patients, a study suggests. The small, preliminary study isn't proof the drug works and it found only a small benefit:...
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April 18, 2018 - 11:06 am
CHICAGO (AP) — There's an extra bonus to marriage for melanoma patients: They tend to be diagnosed in earlier more treatable stages than patients who are unmarried, widowed or divorced, a new study says. Spouses may be apt to notice suspicious moles on their partners that could signal melanoma, the...
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April 18, 2018 - 11:02 am
CHICAGO (AP) — There's an extra bonus to marriage for melanoma patients: New research says they tend to be diagnosed in earlier more treatable stages than patients who are unmarried, widowed or divorced. Spouses may be apt to notice suspicious moles on their partners that could signal melanoma, the...
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FILE - This May 23, 2017, file photo shows GW Pharmaceuticals’ Epidiolex, a medicine made from the marijuana plant but without TCH. The medicine reduced seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy and warrants approval in the United States, health officials said Tuesday, April 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Kathy Young, File)
April 17, 2018 - 2:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A closely watched medicine made from the marijuana plant reduces seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy and warrants approval in the United States, health officials said Tuesday. British drugmaker GW Pharmaceuticals is seeking permission to sell its purified form of an...
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This 2015 photo made available by Merck shows the drug Keytruda. Research released on Monday, April 16, 2018 suggests that many more lung cancer patients may benefit from treatments that boost the immune system, which have scored some of their biggest wins until now in less common cancer types. Using one of these drugs _ Merck's Keytruda _ with usual chemotherapy extended survival for people newly diagnosed with the most common type of cancer that had spread beyond the lungs, one study found. (Michael Lund/Merck via AP)
April 16, 2018 - 10:42 am
CHICAGO (AP) — For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It's the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers. In the study...
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FILE - This June 16, 2016 file photo made with a fisheye lens shows bottles of alcohol during a tour of a state liquor store in Salt Lake City. A large international study released on Thursday, April 12, 2018 says adults should average no more than one alcoholic drink per day, and that means many countries’ alcohol consumption guidelines may be far too loose. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
April 13, 2018 - 9:26 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Here's some sobering news: A large international study says adults should average no more than one alcoholic drink per day, and that means drinking guidelines in many countries may be far too loose. The study found that people who down more than seven drinks a week can expect to die...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, July 23, 2002 file photo, a doctor holds the medication Zyban in Kansas City, Kan. According to industry-funded research mandated by U.S. and European regulators and released on Monday April 9, 2018, Chantix and Zyban, two heavily promoted smoking cessation drugs, are as safe for the heart as nicotine patches and dummy pills. (AP Photo/Ed Zurga)
April 09, 2018 - 12:35 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Two popular stop-smoking drugs are as safe for the heart as nicotine patches and dummy pills, according to research requested by U.S. and European regulators. The results come from an extension of a big study of Chantix and Zyban that earlier found no increased risks for severe...
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FILE - This undated photo provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine in March 2018 shows Dr. Robert Redfield Jr. On Thursday, March 29, 2018, Redfield, the new director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention pledged to work to bring the nation’s opioid epidemic “to its knees” and said he believes the AIDS epidemic could be ended in three to seven years. (Tracey Brown/University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP)
March 29, 2018 - 6:48 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The new director of the top U.S. public health agency on Thursday pledged to work to bring the nation's opioid epidemic "to its knees" and said he believes the AIDS epidemic could be ended in three to seven years. Dr. Robert Redfield Jr. made the comments at a staff meeting of the...
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