Medical research

FILE - This July 31, 2012, file photo shows a mammogram, a test to detect cancer. A new study suggests that adding MRIs to mammograms to screen women with very dense breasts may find more cancers but also gives a lot of false alarms. (Torin Halsey/Times Record News via AP, File)
November 27, 2019 - 5:05 pm
Giving women with very dense breasts an MRI scan in addition to a mammogram led to fewer missed cancers but also to a lot of false alarms and treatments that might not have been needed, a large study found. The results give a clearer picture of the tradeoffs involved in such testing, but they can't...
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November 22, 2019 - 1:05 pm
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf said Friday his administration will spend $3 million on a pair of studies to explore the potential health effects of the natural gas industry, taking action after months of impassioned pleas by the families of pediatric cancer patients who live in the most heavily drilled...
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November 22, 2019 - 9:18 am
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf said Friday his administration will spend $3 million on a pair of studies to explore the potential health effects of the natural gas industry, taking action after months of impassioned pleas by the families of pediatric cancer patients who live in the most heavily drilled...
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November 22, 2019 - 9:02 am
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf said Friday his administration will spend $3 million on a pair of studies to explore the potential health impacts of the natural gas industry, taking action after months of impassioned pleas by the families of pediatric cancer patients who live in the most heavily drilled...
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FILE - This May 26, 2009 file photo shows a printout from an electrocardiogram machine in Missouri. Doctors are reporting that novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Gene-targeting medicines also showed promise in studies discussed Monday, Nov. 18, 2019, at an American Heart Association conference in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
November 18, 2019 - 3:26 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Several experimental drugs also showed early promise for...
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FILE - This May 26, 2009 file photo shows a printout from an electrocardiogram machine in Missouri. Doctors are reporting that novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Gene-targeting medicines also showed promise in studies discussed Monday, Nov. 18, 2019, at an American Heart Association conference in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
November 18, 2019 - 2:12 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Several experimental drugs also showed early promise for...
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November 18, 2019 - 1:49 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Doctors are reporting that novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. The drug, colchicine, works by...
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In this Feb. 16, 2017 file photo, surgeons perform a non-emergency angioplasty at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Through a blood vessel in the groin, a tube is guided to a blockage in the heart. A tiny balloon is then inflated to flatten the clog, and a mesh tube called a stent is inserted to prop the artery open. According to a federally funded study released on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019, people with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying over the following few years. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
November 16, 2019 - 2:02 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — People with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying over the following few years...
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In this Feb. 16, 2017 file photo, surgeons perform a non-emergency angioplasty at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Through a blood vessel in the groin, a tube is guided to a blockage in the heart. A tiny balloon is then inflated to flatten the clog, and a mesh tube called a stent is inserted to prop the artery open. According to a federally funded study released on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019, people with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying over the following few years. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
November 16, 2019 - 2:01 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A large study finds that people with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying...
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This undated image provided by Novartis shows bottles of Novartis’s Adakveo. U.S. regulators have approved the new sickle cell disease medicine that can prevent extremely painful, dangerous “crises” in which misshapen blood cells clump together, reducing blood and oxygen flow. (Novartis via AP)
November 15, 2019 - 3:48 pm
U.S. regulators on Friday approved a new medicine that can prevent some extremely painful sickle cell disease flare-ups. The Food and Drug Administration approved Novartis AG’s Adakveo for patients 16 and older. The monthly infusion, which halves occurrences of sickle cell pain episodes, will carry...
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