Medical research

This microscope image shows the 46 human chromosomes, blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Research released on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 offers some of the first biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease, and how this most common form of dementia varies by gender. (Hesed Padilla-Nash, Thomas Ried/National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health via AP)
July 16, 2019 - 3:10 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — New research gives some biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease and how this most common form of dementia varies by sex. At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles on Tuesday, scientists offered evidence...
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This microscope image shows the 46 human chromosomes, blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Research released on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 offers some of the first biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease, and how this most common form of dementia varies by gender. (Hesed Padilla-Nash, Thomas Ried/National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health via AP)
July 16, 2019 - 2:45 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — New research gives some biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease and how this most common form of dementia varies by sex. At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles on Tuesday, scientists offered evidence...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 1:28 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 12:35 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 12:21 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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In this 2014 photo provided by the University of Mississippi, Dr. Suman Chandra inspects marijuana plants growing at the Ole Miss medicinal gardens in University, Miss. The plants are used for research under a contract from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The planned NIDA grow for 2019 will be divided between high THC and high CBD varieties with “recent interest (in CBD) as a potential medicine for a number of medical conditions,” NIDA said. (Robert Jordan/University of Mississippi via AP)
July 11, 2019 - 7:00 pm
The U.S. government is growing the largest crop of research marijuana in five years, responding to interest in varieties with high levels of THC and CBD. The government is the only source of pot for nearly all research in the U.S., while it still considers it illegal and dangerous. Scientists have...
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July 05, 2019 - 1:36 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Alzheimer's disease may be a risk for older prostate cancer patients given hormone-blocking treatment, a large, U.S. government-funded analysis found. Previous evidence has been mixed on whether the treatment might be linked with mental decline. But experts say the new results stand...
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FILE - This Nov. 27, 2015 file photo shows two marijuana buds displayed for a customer in Denver. A government report released on Tuesday, June 17, 2019 shows that pot use in pregnancy has doubled among U.S. women and is most common during the first trimester. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
June 18, 2019 - 4:52 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Pot use in pregnancy has doubled among U.S. women and is most common during the first trimester, government research shows. Overall, 7% of pregnant women, or 1 in 14, said they used marijuana in the past month. That's from a nationally representative health survey in 2016-17 and...
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FILE - This Dec. 4, 2017, file photo shows the Pfizer company logo at the company's headquarters in New York. Pfizer is buying the cancer treatment company Array BioPharma in a deal worth $11.4 billion. Array has a combination therapy for BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma, along with a pipeline of targeted cancer medicines in development and a portfolio of other medicines that are expected to generate significant royalties over time. (AP Photo/Richard Drewm Fuke, File)
June 17, 2019 - 8:28 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Pfizer is delving deeper into cancer research with a roughly $11.4 billion deal for Array BioPharma, a drug developer that has seen its shares soar since announcing positive clinical trial results earlier this spring. Pfizer said Monday it will pay $48 per share in cash for Array,...
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In this May 13, 2019, photo, Bella the vervet monkey looks at the camera at Primates Inc., in Westfield, Wis. Besides Bella, previously a pet, the sanctuary has five rhesus macaque monkeys that were previously used in medical research. More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years after research studies are done, according to sanctuaries and researchers. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
June 13, 2019 - 7:45 am
WESTFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined inside a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health. But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture outside,...
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