Media

Vern Miyagi, Administrator, HEMA, left, and Hawaii Gov. David Ige addressed the media Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, during a press conference at the Hawaii Emergency Management Center at Diamond Head Saturday following the false alarm issued of a missile launch on Hawaii. A push alert that warned of an incoming ballistic missile to Hawaii and sent residents into a full-blown panic was a mistake, state emergency officials said. (George F. Lee /The Star-Advertiser via AP)
January 14, 2018 - 1:03 am
HONOLULU (AP) — The second recent blunder in Hawaii's planning for a possible North Korean nuclear attack left islanders shaken after an emergency alert warning of an imminent strike sounded on hundreds of thousands of cellphones. For nearly 40 minutes people waited. Then came the second mobile...
Read More
Vern Miyagi, Administrator, HEMA, left, and Hawaii Gov. David Ige addressed the media Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, during a press conference at the Hawaii Emergency Management Center at Diamond Head Saturday following the false alarm issued of a missile launch on Hawaii. A push alert that warned of an incoming ballistic missile to Hawaii and sent residents into a full-blown panic was a mistake, state emergency officials said. (George F. Lee /The Star-Advertiser via AP)
January 13, 2018 - 10:20 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — A false alarm that warned of a ballistic missile headed for Hawaii sent the islands into a panic Saturday, with people abandoning cars in a highway and preparing to flee their homes until officials said the cellphone alert was a mistake. Hawaii officials apologized repeatedly and...
Read More
Diamond Head, an extinct volcanic crater, and high-rises are seen in Honolulu on Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018. A push alert that warned of an incoming ballistic missile to Hawaii and sent residents into a full-blown panic was a mistake, state emergency officials said. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)
January 13, 2018 - 9:59 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — A false alarm that warned of a ballistic missile headed for Hawaii sent the islands into a panic Saturday, with people abandoning cars in a highway and preparing to flee their homes until officials said the cellphone alert was a mistake. Hawaii officials apologized repeatedly and...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a prison reform roundtable in the Roosevelt Room of the Washington. Many parts of the world were shocked by Trump’s vulgar insult of Africa, at least once foreign-language news organizations figured out how to translate the epithet. Japanese media went with translations ranging from simply “filthy” to the more vivid “dripping with excrement.” Chinese state media went with “fenkeng,” which means “cesspit.” And some African outlets decided to use a word meaning “dirty countries” and leave it at that. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
January 13, 2018 - 7:11 pm
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — President Donald Trump's vulgar insult of Africa was a puzzle for many foreign media organizations, which didn't have a ready translation of his epithet for their readers or listeners. Their answers ranged from "dirty" to, well, dirtier. While meeting with senators on...
Read More
This smartphone screen capture shows a false incoming ballistic missile emergency alert sent from the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency system on Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)
January 13, 2018 - 5:41 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — A false alarm that warned of a ballistic missile headed for Hawaii sent the islands into a panic Saturday, with people abandoning cars in a highway and preparing to flee their homes until officials said the cellphone alert was a mistake. It wasn't clear exactly what happened — House...
Read More
This smartphone screen capture shows a false incoming ballistic missile emergency alert sent from the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency system on Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)
January 13, 2018 - 5:27 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — A false alarm that warned of a ballistic missile headed for Hawaii sent the islands into a panic Saturday, with people abandoning cars in a highway and preparing to flee their homes until officials said the cellphone alert was a mistake. It wasn't clear exactly what happened — House...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2015, file photo, Pastor Mark Burns, co-founder & CEO of Christian Television Network, from Easley, S.C., right, speaks to the members of the media outside Trump Tower in New York. A few of President Donald Trump’s leading evangelical supporters defended him after he questioned why the U.S. should accept more immigrants from Haiti and "shithole countries” in Africa. However, many other evangelicals condemned his remarks, citing their increasing devotion to fellow Christians overseas, along with the large numbers of immigrants in U.S. churches and their families. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
January 13, 2018 - 5:27 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump's vulgar remarks questioning why the U.S. should admit immigrants from Haiti and Africa have spotlighted the bitter divide among American evangelicals about his presidency. While some of his evangelical backers expressed support for his leadership, other conservative...
Read More
This smartphone screen capture shows a false incoming ballistic missile emergency alert sent from the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency system on Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)
January 13, 2018 - 4:34 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — A push alert that warned of a ballistic missile heading straight for Hawaii and sent residents into a full-blown panic Saturday was issued by mistake, state emergency officials said. The emergency alert, which was sent to cellphones just before 8:10 a.m., said in all caps, "...
Read More
FILE - In this May 31, 2006 file photo, Katie Couric and Matt Lauer, co-hosts of the NBC Today" program, open her farewell broadcast in New York. Couric told People in a story published Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018: “I had no idea this was going on during my tenure or after I left.” She left NBC in 2006 to anchor the “CBS Evening News” and has been criticized for not speaking out in the more than a month since Lauer was fired. The show’s network, NBC, said an investigation of a Lauer colleague’s detailed complaint showed “inappropriate sexual behavior.” Since, other women have reportedly accused him of harassment and assault.(AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
January 13, 2018 - 3:55 pm
Katie Couric, who was Matt Lauer's "Today" co-host for several years, broke her silence Saturday on sexual misconduct allegations against him. Couric told People magazine: "I had no idea this was going on during my tenure or after I left." She departed NBC in 2006 to anchor the "CBS Evening News"...
Read More
FILE - In this May 31, 2006 file photo, Katie Couric and Matt Lauer, co-hosts of the NBC Today" program, open her farewell broadcast in New York. Couric told People in a story published Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018: “I had no idea this was going on during my tenure or after I left.” She left NBC in 2006 to anchor the “CBS Evening News” and has been criticized for not speaking out in the more than a month since Lauer was fired. The show’s network, NBC, said an investigation of a Lauer colleague’s detailed complaint showed “inappropriate sexual behavior.” Since, other women have reportedly accused him of harassment and assault.(AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
January 13, 2018 - 3:51 pm
Katie Couric has broken her silence on sexual misconduct allegations against her former "Today" co-host, Matt Lauer. Couric told People magazine in a story published Saturday she had "no idea this was going on" while she was working with him and even after she left in 2006 to anchor "CBS Evening...
Read More

Pages