Media industry

Clemson safety Nolan Turner (24) celebrates after his interception against Ohio State during the final minute of the Fiesta Bowl NCAA college football playoff semifinal Saturday, Dec. 28, 2019, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)
December 31, 2019 - 2:59 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — With a feast of football, ESPN outpaced all of the broadcasters to be the most-watched network on television during holiday week. The showcase was ESPN's college football championship semi-finals, which together averaged 19.3 million viewers and outpaced last year's games by 6%, the...
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In this Sept. 23, 2019 photo, rescued migrants look at a map of Europe aboard the Ocean Viking humanitarian ship as it sails in the Mediterranean Sea. The misery of migrants in Libya has spawned a thriving and highly lucrative business, in part funded by the EU and enabled by the United Nations, an Associated Press investigation has found. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
December 31, 2019 - 2:29 pm
TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — When the European Union started funneling millions of euros into Libya to slow the tide of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the money came with EU promises to improve detention centers notorious for abuse and fight human trafficking. That hasn’t happened. Instead, the...
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In this Sept. 23, 2019 photo, rescued migrants look at a map of Europe aboard the Ocean Viking humanitarian ship as it sails in the Mediterranean Sea. The misery of migrants in Libya has spawned a thriving and highly lucrative business, in part funded by the EU and enabled by the United Nations, an Associated Press investigation has found. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
December 31, 2019 - 11:16 am
TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — When the European Union started funneling millions of euros into Libya to slow the tide of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the money came with EU promises to improve detention centers notorious for abuse and fight human trafficking. That hasn’t happened. Instead, the...
Read More
In this Sept. 23, 2019 photo, rescued migrants look at a map of Europe aboard the Ocean Viking humanitarian ship as it sails in the Mediterranean Sea. The misery of migrants in Libya has spawned a thriving and highly lucrative business, in part funded by the EU and enabled by the United Nations, an Associated Press investigation has found. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
December 31, 2019 - 8:10 am
TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — When the European Union started funneling millions of euros into Libya to slow the tide of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the money came with EU promises to improve detention centers notorious for abuse and fight human trafficking. That hasn’t happened. Instead, the...
Read More
In this Sept. 23, 2019 photo, rescued migrants look at a map of Europe aboard the Ocean Viking humanitarian ship as it sails in the Mediterranean Sea. The misery of migrants in Libya has spawned a thriving and highly lucrative business, in part funded by the EU and enabled by the United Nations, an Associated Press investigation has found. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
December 31, 2019 - 7:06 am
TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — When the European Union started funneling millions of euros into Libya to slow the tide of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the money came with EU promises to improve detention centers notorious for abuse and fight human trafficking. That hasn’t happened. Instead, the...
Read More
In this Sept. 23, 2019 photo, rescued migrants look at a map of Europe aboard the Ocean Viking humanitarian ship as it sails in the Mediterranean Sea. The misery of migrants in Libya has spawned a thriving and highly lucrative business, in part funded by the EU and enabled by the United Nations, an Associated Press investigation has found. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
December 31, 2019 - 5:42 am
TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — When the European Union started funneling millions of euros into Libya to slow the tide of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the money came with EU promises to improve detention centers notorious for abuse and fight human trafficking. That hasn’t happened. Instead, the...
Read More
In this Sept. 23, 2019 photo, rescued migrants look at a map of Europe aboard the Ocean Viking humanitarian ship as it sails in the Mediterranean Sea. The misery of migrants in Libya has spawned a thriving and highly lucrative business, in part funded by the EU and enabled by the United Nations, an Associated Press investigation has found. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
December 31, 2019 - 4:41 am
TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — When the European Union started funneling millions of euros into Libya to slow the tide of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the money came with EU promises to improve detention centers notorious for abuse and fight human trafficking. That hasn’t happened. Instead, the...
Read More
In this Sept. 23, 2019 photo, rescued migrants look at a map of Europe aboard the Ocean Viking humanitarian ship as it sails in the Mediterranean Sea. The misery of migrants in Libya has spawned a thriving and highly lucrative business, in part funded by the EU and enabled by the United Nations, an Associated Press investigation has found. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
December 31, 2019 - 4:15 am
TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — When the European Union started funneling millions of euros into Libya to slow the tide of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the money came with EU promises to improve detention centers notorious for abuse and fight human trafficking. That hasn’t happened. Instead, the...
Read More
In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, Chinese scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview at his laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese state media says the researcher He has been sentenced to three years for practicing medicine illegally. He Jiankui was also fined 3 million yuan. Two others were also sentenced on the same charge. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 30, 2019 - 4:31 pm
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese scientist who set off an ethical debate with claims that he had made the world's first genetically edited babies was sentenced Monday to three years in prison because of his research, state media said. He Jiankui, who was convicted of practicing medicine without a license,...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, Chinese scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview at his laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese state media says the researcher He has been sentenced to three years for practicing medicine illegally. He Jiankui was also fined 3 million yuan. Two others were also sentenced on the same charge. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 30, 2019 - 6:23 am
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese scientist who set off an ethical debate with claims that he had made the world's first genetically edited babies was sentenced Monday to three years in prison because of his research, state media said. He Jiankui, who was convicted of practicing medicine without a license,...
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