Marketing and advertising

FILE - In this May 9, 2018, file photo, a woman votes in Sandy Springs, Ga. It’s been more than three years since Russia's sweeping effort to interfere in U.S. elections through disinformation on social media, stolen campaign emails and attacks on voting systems. U.S. officials have made advances in trying to prevent similar attacks from undermining the 2020 vote, but challenges remain. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
January 26, 2020 - 9:48 am
It’s been more than three years since Russia's sweeping and systematic effort to interfere in U.S. elections through disinformation on social media, stolen campaign emails and attacks on voting systems. U.S. officials have made advances in trying to prevent similar attacks from undermining the 2020...
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FILE - In this May 9, 2018, file photo, a woman votes in Sandy Springs, Ga. It’s been more than three years since Russia's sweeping effort to interfere in U.S. elections through disinformation on social media, stolen campaign emails and attacks on voting systems. U.S. officials have made advances in trying to prevent similar attacks from undermining the 2020 vote, but challenges remain. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
January 26, 2020 - 7:58 am
It’s been more than three years since Russia's sweeping and systematic effort to interfere in U.S. elections through disinformation on social media, stolen campaign emails and attacks on voting systems. U.S. officials have made advances in trying to prevent similar attacks from undermining the 2020...
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U.S. Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham unveils its national advertising and outreach campaign for the 2020 Census, at the Arena Stage, Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Michael A. McCoy)
January 14, 2020 - 8:41 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Faced with a changed media landscape from the last once-a-decade head count in 2010, U.S. Census Bureau officials unveiled a multi-million dollar media campaign on Tuesday involving hundreds of digital ads, TV commercials, radio spots, billboards and prints ads in 13 languages...
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U.S. Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham unveils its national advertising and outreach campaign for the 2020 Census, at the Arena Stage, Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Michael A. McCoy)
January 14, 2020 - 4:19 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Faced with a changed media landscape from the last once-a-decade head count in 2010, U.S. Census Bureau officials unveiled a multi-million dollar media campaign on Tuesday involving hundreds of digital ads, TV commercials, radio spots, billboards and prints ads in 13 languages...
Read More
U.S. Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham unveils its national advertising and outreach campaign for the 2020 Census, at the Arena Stage, Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Michael A. McCoy)
January 14, 2020 - 1:52 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Faced with a changed media landscape from the last once-a-decade head count in 2010, U.S. Census Bureau officials unveiled a multi-million dollar media campaign on Tuesday involving hundreds of digital ads, TV commercials, radio spots, billboards and prints ads in 13 languages...
Read More
FILE - This Jan. 17, 2017, file photo shows a Facebook logo at Station F in Paris. Facebook has decided not to limit how political ads can be targeted to specific groups of people, as its main digital-ad rival Google did in November 2019 to fight misinformation. Neither will it ban political ads outright, as Twitter has done. And it still won't fact check them, as it's faced pressure to do. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
January 09, 2020 - 2:06 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Despite escalating pressure ahead of the 2020 presidential election, Facebook reaffirmed its freewheeling policy on political ads Thursday, saying it won’t ban them, won’t fact-check them and won’t limit how they can be targeted to specific groups of people. Instead, Facebook...
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FILE - This Jan. 17, 2017, file photo shows a Facebook logo at Station F in Paris. Facebook has decided not to limit how political ads can be targeted to specific groups of people, as its main digital-ad rival Google did in November 2019 to fight misinformation. Neither will it ban political ads outright, as Twitter has done. And it still won't fact check them, as it's faced pressure to do. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
January 09, 2020 - 11:00 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook has decided not to limit how political ads can be targeted to specific groups of people, as its main digital-ad rival Google did in November to fight misinformation. Neither will it ban political ads outright, as Twitter did last October. And Facebook still won't fact...
Read More
FILE - This Jan. 17, 2017, file photo shows a Facebook logo at Station F in Paris. Facebook has decided not to limit how political ads can be targeted to specific groups of people, as its main digital-ad rival Google did in November 2019 to fight misinformation. Neither will it ban political ads outright, as Twitter has done. And it still won't fact check them, as it's faced pressure to do. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
January 09, 2020 - 8:41 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook has decided not to limit how political ads can be targeted to specific groups of people, as its main digital-ad rival Google did in November to fight misinformation. Neither will it ban political ads outright, as Twitter did last October. And it still won't fact check...
Read More
FILE - This Jan. 17, 2017, file photo shows a Facebook logo at Station F in Paris. Facebook has decided not to limit how political ads can be targeted to specific groups of people, as its main digital-ad rival Google did in November 2019 to fight misinformation. Neither will it ban political ads outright, as Twitter has done. And it still won't fact check them, as it's faced pressure to do. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
January 09, 2020 - 6:12 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook has decided not to limit how political ads can be targeted to specific groups of people, as its main digital-ad rival Google did in November to fight misinformation. Neither will it ban political ads outright, as Twitter did last October. And it still won't fact check...
Read More
FILE - In this March 13, 2018 file photo, Josh Duhamel arrives at a special screening of "Love, Simon" in Los Angeles. Duhamel will continue promote his home state of North Dakota. North Dakota's tourism department confirmed Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019 to The Associated Press that the star of several "Transformers" movies will be paid $175,000 to be the face of the state's tourism campaign for the next two years. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP File)
December 31, 2019 - 12:38 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota will again enlist the help of Hollywood actor Josh Duhamel to help promote tourism in his home state. North Dakota's tourism department confirmed Tuesday to The Associated Press that the star of several "Transformers" movies will be paid $175,000 to be the face of...
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