Marine biology

In this Wednesday, March 6, 2019 photo, provided by the NOAA Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, is an entangled subadult humpback whale that was freed of gear by a team of trained responders off Makena Beach, Hawaii. Officials say a number of private boats helped a team of federal responders free a young humpback whale from heavy gauge fishing gear off Hawaii. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in a joint statement Thursday that the "subadult" humpback was first spotted Wednesday morning by a dive boat off Maui. (Ed Lyman/NOAA Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 1:10 am
HONOLULU (AP) — A number of private boats helped a team of federal responders free a young humpback whale from heavy gauge fishing gear off Hawaii, officials said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in a joint statement that the "subadult" humpback was first spotted...
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This undated photo provided by Paul Tixier in March 2019 shows a Type D killer whale. Scientists are waiting for test results from a tissue sample, which could give them the DNA evidence to prove the new type is a distinct species. (Paul Tixier/CEBC CNRS/MNHN Paris via AP)
March 07, 2019 - 5:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — For decades, there were tales from fishermen and tourists, even lots of photos, of a mysterious killer whale that just didn't look like all the others, but scientists had never seen one. Now they have. An international team of researchers says they found a couple dozen of these...
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This undated photo provided by Paul Tixier in March 2019 shows a Type D killer whale. Scientists are waiting for test results from a tissue sample, which could give them the DNA evidence to prove the new type is a distinct species. (Paul Tixier/CEBC CNRS/MNHN Paris via AP)
March 07, 2019 - 3:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists say they've found a new type of killer whale off the coast of Chile that looks distinctly different from other orcas. The whale's signature white eye patch is smaller. Their heads are a bit more rounded than normal killer whales and their dorsal fins are more narrow and...
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In this Feb. 21, 2019 photo, provided by UC Santa Barbara, Jessica Nielsen, a conservation specialist, examines a beached hoodwinker sunfish at at Coal Oil Point Reserve in Santa Barbara, Calif. (Thomas Turner/UC Santa Barbara via AP)
March 01, 2019 - 5:12 pm
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) — A 7-foot (215-centimeter) sea creature that washed ashore in Southern California has been identified as a hoodwinker sunfish, a recently identified rare species thought to live in the Southern Hemisphere. The University of California, Santa Barbara, said an intern...
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In this undated photo provided by researcher Alex Jordan in February 2019, a cleaner wrasse interacts with its reflection in a mirror placed on the outside of the aquarium glass. The mirror itself cannot be seen in this photo because the aquarium glass itself becomes reflective at the viewing angle of the camera, but the fish sees the aquarium glass as transparent because of its direct viewing angle. In a report released on Thursday, Feb 7, 2019, scientists say that 10 fish they studied can pass a standard test of recognizing themselves in a mirror _ and that is posing a key question for experts in animal mental prowess. Does this 50-year-old test for self-awareness in animals really show that ability? (Alex Jordan via AP)
February 07, 2019 - 2:20 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists report that a fish can pass a standard test of recognizing itself in a mirror — and they raise a question about what that means. Does this decades-old test, designed to show self-awareness in animals, really do that? Since the mirror test was introduced in 1970,...
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In this undated photo provided by researcher Alex Jordan in February 2019, a cleaner wrasse interacts with its reflection in a mirror placed on the outside of the aquarium glass. The mirror itself cannot be seen in this photo because the aquarium glass itself becomes reflective at the viewing angle of the camera, but the fish sees the aquarium glass as transparent because of its direct viewing angle. In a report released on Thursday, Feb 7, 2019, scientists say that 10 fish they studied can pass a standard test of recognizing themselves in a mirror _ and that is posing a key question for experts in animal mental prowess. Does this 50-year-old test for self-awareness in animals really show that ability? (Alex Jordan via AP)
February 07, 2019 - 2:15 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists report that a fish can pass a standard test of recognizing itself in a mirror, but they are questioning just what that means. The test was designed to show self-awareness in animals, but a new study says that may not be so. Few animals can pass the test, which involves...
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February 01, 2019 - 11:04 pm
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Origin stories aren't just for comic-book superheroes, as a documentary about the evolution of animals including elephants and whales intends to show. The two-hour film will highlight the work of leading scientists worldwide and showcase "spectacular new breakthroughs in...
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February 01, 2019 - 10:39 pm
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Origin stories aren't just for comic-book superheroes, as a new film about the evolution of whales, elephants and other animals intends to show. PBS said Friday that the two-hour documentary will highlight the work of new discoveries from leading scientists worldwide. With...
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FILE - In this March 28, 2018 file photo, a North Atlantic right whale feeds on the surface of Cape Cod bay off the coast of Plymouth, Mass. Rescuers who respond to distressed whales and other marine animals say the federal government shutdown is making it more difficult to do their work. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
January 23, 2019 - 12:55 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Rescuers who respond to distressed whales and other marine animals say the federal government shutdown is making it more difficult to do their work. A network of rescue groups in the U.S. works with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to respond to marine...
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FILE- In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. For years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Salmon researchers perusing data on the website of the Center for Whale Research noticed a startling trend: that for the past two decades, significantly more of the whales have died in even-numbered years than in odd years. In a newly published paper, they speculate that the pattern is related to pink salmon, which return to the waters between Washington state and Canada in enormous numbers every other year. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 19, 2019 - 5:29 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Over the years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Four salmon researchers were perusing data on the...
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