Marine biology

June 21, 2019 - 7:57 am
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Scientists say a study of whales and dolphins that have washed up dead in Greece over a 20-year period has found alarmingly high levels of plastic trash in the animals' stomachs, which can condemn them to a slow and painful death. In the worst case, a 5.3-meter (17-foot) young...
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FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2017, file photo, provided by NOAA Fisheries a North Pacific right whale swims in the Bering Sea west of Bristol Bay. Federal scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have recorded singing by a rare right whale for the first time. Researchers used moored acoustic recorders to capture patterned calls made by male North Pacific right whales. Researchers detected four distinct songs over eight years at five locations in the southeast Bering Sea. (NOAA Fisheries via AP, File)
June 19, 2019 - 6:11 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — It's not America's Top 40, but it's a cutting edge song. Federal marine biologists for the first time have recorded singing by one of the rarest whales on the planet, the North Pacific right whale. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers used moored...
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FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2017, file photo, provided by NOAA Fisheries a North Pacific right whale swims in the Bering Sea west of Bristol Bay. Federal scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have recorded singing by a rare right whale for the first time. Researchers used moored acoustic recorders to capture patterned calls made by male North Pacific right whales. Researchers detected four distinct songs over eight years at five locations in the southeast Bering Sea. (NOAA Fisheries via AP, File)
June 19, 2019 - 3:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Federal marine biologists have recorded singing by one of the rarest whales on the planet. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers used moored acoustic recorders to capture repeated patterns of calls made by male North Pacific right whales, the first...
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FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2017, file photo, provided by NOAA Fisheries a North Pacific right whale swims in the Bering Sea west of Bristol Bay. Federal scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have recorded singing by a rare right whale for the first time. Researchers used moored acoustic recorders to capture patterned calls made by male North Pacific right whales. Researchers detected four distinct songs over eight years at five locations in the southeast Bering Sea. (NOAA Fisheries via AP, File)
June 19, 2019 - 1:44 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say they have recorded singing by a rare right whale for the first time. Researchers used moored acoustic recorders to capture patterned calls made by male North Pacific right whales. Researchers detected...
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June 19, 2019 - 1:00 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have recorded singing by a rare right whale for the first time. Researchers used moored acoustic recorders to capture patterned calls made by male North Pacific right whales. Researchers detected four...
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FILE - In this May, 22, 2019, file photo, a woman walks with her dogs at Newcomb Hollow Beach, where a boogie boarder was bitten by a shark in 2018 and later died of his injuries, in Wellfleet, Mass. Researchers on Cape Cod are launching a new study focused on the hunting and feeding habits of the region's great white sharks following two attacks on humans in 2018, including the state's first fatal one in more than 80 years. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
June 19, 2019 - 6:10 am
BOSTON (AP) — Researchers on Cape Cod are launching a new study focused on the hunting and feeding habits of the region's great white sharks following last year's two attacks on humans, including the state's first fatal one in more than 80 years. The hope is that the work, which starts in the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 1:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one-sixth of their fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 1:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 12:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 12:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study says the world's oceans will likely lose about one-sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path. A comprehensive computer-based study by an international team of marine biologists found that for every...
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