Marine biology

FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2014 file photo, a laptop computer monitors a patient's heart function as he takes a stress test in Augusta, Ga. The American Heart Association conference ending Monday, Nov. 12, 2018 in Chicago revealed a lot about what works and what does not for preventing heart attacks. (Michael Holahan/The Augusta Chronicle via AP)
November 11, 2018 - 1:04 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Preventing heart attacks and other problems is the focus of top news from an American Heart Association conference that ends Monday in Chicago. A large study found that fish oil, in the amount and type contained in many dietary supplements, did not lower the risk of cancer or heart...
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This undated photo provided by Amarin in November 2018 shows a capsule of the purified, prescription fish oil Vascepa. Although fish oil taken by healthy people, at a dose found in many supplements, showed no clear ability to lower heart or cancer risks, higher amounts of a purified, prescription fish oil, such as Vascepa, slashed heart problems and heart-related deaths among people with high triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, and other risks for heart disease. (Amarin via AP)
November 10, 2018 - 3:12 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Taking fish oil or vitamin D? Big studies give long-awaited answers on who does and does not benefit from these popular nutrients. Fish oil taken by healthy people, at a dose found in many supplements, showed no clear ability to lower heart or cancer risks. Same for vitamin D. But...
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This undated photo provided by Amarin in November 2018 shows a capsule of the purified, prescription fish oil Vascepa. Although fish oil taken by healthy people, at a dose found in many supplements, showed no clear ability to lower heart or cancer risks, higher amounts of a purified, prescription fish oil, such as Vascepa, slashed heart problems and heart-related deaths among people with high triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, and other risks for heart disease. (Amarin via AP)
November 10, 2018 - 3:11 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Two big studies give long-awaited answers on who does and does not benefit from taking fish oil or vitamin D. One finds that a prescription strength fish oil slashed heart problems and heart-related deaths among people with high triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, and other...
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In this Sept. 28, 2015 file photo, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology director Ruth Gates talks about her project to create "super coral" near her lab on Coconut Island in Kaneohe, Hawaii. Gates, who dedicated much of her career to saving the world's fragile and deteriorating coral reefs, has died at age 56. The University of Hawaii, where Gates was the director of the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, said Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018, that the researcher died in Honolulu on Thursday, Oct. 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
October 30, 2018 - 9:04 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Pioneering coral reef scientist Ruth Gates, who dedicated much of her career to saving the world's fragile and deteriorating underwater reef ecosystems, has died. She was 56. Gates died in Honolulu on Thursday, the University of Hawaii said Tuesday. The researcher, also the...
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FILE - In this Dec. 7, 2008, file photo, Nobel Prize in Chemistry laureate Osamu Shimomura speaks during the press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden. Shimomura, one of three scientists who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for the discovery and development of a jellyfish protein that contributed to cancer studies, has died in Japan’s southern city of Nagasaki where he studied as a student. He was 90. His alma mater Nagasaki University said Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, that Shimomura died Friday of natural causes.(AP Photo/Scanpix, Fredrik Persson, File)
October 22, 2018 - 1:05 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japanese-born Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry, has died. He was 90. His alma mater Nagasaki University said Monday that Shimomura died Friday of natural causes. Shimomura and two American scientists shared the 2008 Nobel prize for the discovery...
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In this Oct. 17, 2018 photo, supporters of dam removals and other measures intended to help endangered orca whales stand near a giant inflatable orca outside a building in Tacoma, Wash., where the Southern Resident Killer Whale Recovery Task Force was meeting for a two-day work session. Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of the critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
October 18, 2018 - 6:06 pm
TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention. Some argue the quickest way to get more salmon to the starving whales is to tear down four dams...
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This photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a female Pacific walrus resting, Sept. 19, 2013 in Point Lay, Alaska. A lawsuit making its way through federal court in Alaska will decide whether Pacific walruses should be listed as a threatened species, giving them additional protections. Walruses use sea ice for giving birth, nursing and resting between dives for food but the amount of ice over several decades has steadily declined due to climate warming. (Ryan Kingsbery/U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
October 13, 2018 - 2:39 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice. Likewise, they prefer sea ice for molting, mating, nursing and resting between dives for food. Trouble is, as the century progresses, there's going to be far less ice...
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In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018 photo, a Colorado River razorback sucker fish is shown swimming in a tank at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service office in Lakewood, Colo. Officials say that the rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern United States. (AP Photo/Dan Elliott)
October 04, 2018 - 3:01 pm
DENVER (AP) — Another rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, wildlife officials said Thursday, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern U.S. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommended reclassifying the ancient and odd-looking...
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In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018 photo, a Colorado River razorback sucker fish is shown swimming in a tank at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service office in Lakewood, Colo. Officials say that the rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern United States. (AP Photo/Dan Elliott)
October 04, 2018 - 12:29 am
DENVER (AP) — Another rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern U.S. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to announce Thursday that it will recommend reclassifying the ancient and odd-...
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September 05, 2018 - 6:39 pm
ISLIP, N.Y. (AP) — A tooth taken from the leg of a boy bitten at New York's Fire Island National Seashore has been identified as that of a sand tiger shark, after a DNA comparison, researchers announced Wednesday. University of Florida researchers compared DNA from the tooth to a genetic dataset of...
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