Lawsuits

December 01, 2019 - 10:16 pm
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — In a story Nov. 30 about New Jersey sex abuse limits, The Associated Press reported erroneously the type of clients two attorneys represent. Attorneys Jay Mascolo and Jason Amala represent about 40 plaintiffs, not defendants. A corrected version of the story is below: Lawsuit...
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November 30, 2019 - 2:07 pm
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — The loosening of limits on sexual abuse claims in New Jersey is expected to create a tectonic shift in the way those lawsuits are brought, giving hope to victims who have long suffered in silence and exposing a broader spectrum of institutions to potential liability. A law...
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November 30, 2019 - 11:58 am
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — The loosening of limits on sexual abuse claims in New Jersey is expected to create a tectonic shift in the way those lawsuits are brought, giving hope to victims who have long suffered in silence and exposing a broader spectrum of institutions to potential liability. A law...
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November 30, 2019 - 11:56 am
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — An unprecedented number of sexual abuse lawsuits could hit New Jersey courts beginning Sunday with the relaxation of limits on when those suits can be filed. A law passed last spring allows child victims to sue until they turn 55 or within seven years of their first realization...
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CDU party chairwoman Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer takes a seat in an electric ID.3 car displayed by the car manufacturer Volkswagen at the German Christian Democrats Party (CDU) convention in Leipzig, Germany, Saturday, Nov. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
November 28, 2019 - 4:21 am
BERLIN (AP) — A German appeals court has ruled in several lawsuits against automaker Volkswagen, saying consumers who unknowingly bought cars with software installed to cheat diesel emissions tests deserve compensation but those who purchased them later don’t. The Stuttgart appeals court ruled...
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FILE - This March 15, 2016, file photo, shows casino mogul Steve Wynn at a news conference in Medford, Mass. Wynn Resorts has agreed to accept $41 million from former CEO and chairman Wynn and insurance carriers as part of a settlement stemming from shareholder lawsuits accusing company directors of failing to disclose the casino mogul’s alleged pattern of sexual misconduct. The company said in a statement late Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019, neither the company nor its current or former directors or officers were found to have committed any wrongdoing in connection with the pending settlement. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
November 27, 2019 - 10:27 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — Wynn Resorts agreed Wednesday to accept $41 million from former CEO and chairman Steve Wynn and insurance carriers as part of a settlement stemming from shareholder lawsuits accusing company directors of failing to disclose the casino mogul’s alleged pattern of sexual misconduct...
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FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2019 file photo, James Bopp, the attorney for conservative religious groups challenging limits on Indiana's religious objections law, speaks with reporters at the Hamilton County government center in Noblesville, Ind. Conservative religious groups have failed to convince an Indiana judge they've faced any harm from limits placed on the state's contentious religious objections law signed by then-Gov. Mike Pence. Bopp, argued during an October hearing that they were subject to "grotesque stripping" of their religious rights by the Republican-dominated Legislature. (AP Photo/Tom Davies File)
November 27, 2019 - 1:46 pm
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indiana judge has canceled a trial challenging limits on the state’s religious objections law, finding conservative groups failed to prove they were harmed by changes the Republican-dominated Legislature approved shortly after then-Gov. Mike Pence signed it. In calling off...
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FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2015 file photo, St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar speaks in Clayton, Mo. St. Louis County leaders are working to address the culture of the police department following last month's jury verdict awarding $20 million to police Sgt. Keith Wildhaber, who alleged he was discriminated against because he is gay. Experts say many departments across the U.S. are working to be more inclusive and are increasingly reaching out to the LGBTQ community. Some, including departments in San Jose, California, and Memphis, Tennessee, are seeking to recruit gay and lesbian officers. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
November 27, 2019 - 11:44 am
CLAYTON, Mo. (AP) — It is possible to change the police culture in St. Louis County, which was on the losing end of a $20 million jury award to a gay officer who claimed he had been discriminated against, but experts say changing such “hypermasculine” environments requires a commitment from those...
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FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2015 file photo, St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar speaks in Clayton, Mo. St. Louis County leaders are working to address the culture of the police department following last month's jury verdict awarding $20 million to police Sgt. Keith Wildhaber, who alleged he was discriminated against because he is gay. Experts say many departments across the U.S. are working to be more inclusive and are increasingly reaching out to the LGBTQ community. Some, including departments in San Jose, California, and Memphis, Tennessee, are seeking to recruit gay and lesbian officers. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
November 27, 2019 - 11:42 am
CLAYTON, Mo. (AP) — It is possible to change the police culture in St. Louis County, which was on the losing end of a $20 million jury award to a gay officer who claimed he had been discriminated against, but experts say change in such a “hypermasculine” environment requires a commitment from those...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2005 file photo, the offices of Teva Pharmaceuticals North America are seen in Horsham, Pa. At least a half-dozen companies that make or distribute prescription opioid painkillers are facing a federal criminal investigation of their roles in a nationwide addiction and overdose crisis. The Wall Street Journal first reported the investigation Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019, citing unnamed sources familiar with the probe. (AP Photo/George Widman, File)
November 27, 2019 - 1:27 am
At least a half-dozen companies that make or distribute prescription opioid painkillers are facing a federal criminal investigation of their roles in a nationwide addiction and overdose crisis. The Wall Street Journal first reported the investigation Tuesday, citing unnamed sources familiar with...
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