Laws

FILE - In this Dec. 29, 2015 file photo, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf speaks with members of the media at the state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa. Many state and local governments across the country have suspended public records requirements amid the coronavirus pandemic, denying or delaying access to information that could shed light on key government decisions. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
May 14, 2020 - 12:42 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Many state and local governments across the country have suspended public records requirements amid the coronavirus pandemic, denying or delaying access to information that could shed light on key government decisions. Public officials have said employees either don't...
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 12, 2020. Standing behind McConnell is Senate Majority Whip John Thune, R-S.D. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
May 13, 2020 - 8:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate came one vote short Wednesday of approving a proposal to prevent federal law enforcement from obtaining internet browsing information or search history without seeking a warrant. The bipartisan amendment won a solid majority of the Senate but just shy of the 60 votes...
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FILE - In this July 10, 2018, file photo, former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn leaves the federal courthouse in Washington, following a status hearing. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
May 12, 2020 - 10:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge made clear Tuesday that he would not immediately rule on the Justice Department's decision to dismiss its criminal case against former Trump administration national security adviser Michael Flynn, saying he would instead let outside individuals and groups weigh in...
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In this May 3, 2020 photo, the setting sun shines on the Supreme Court building on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
May 06, 2020 - 10:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court held Day Three of arguments by telephone with the audio available live to audiences around the world. The higher profile case of the two heard by the justices on Wednesday dealt with Trump administration rules that would allow more employers who cite a religious...
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May 05, 2020 - 5:38 pm
BELLE PLAINE, Kan. (AP) — The attorneys general for 11 Midwestern states urged the Justice Department on Tuesday to pursue a federal investigation into market concentration and potential price fixing by meatpackers in the cattle industry during the coronavirus pandemic. In a letter to U.S. Attorney...
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FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2019, file photo dozens of supporters of a measure to limit when companies can label workers as independent contractors circle the Capitol during a rally in Sacramento, Calif. California is suing ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft, alleging they misclassified their drivers as independent contractors under the state's new labor law, AB5, in effect as of Jan. 1. Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the lawsuit Tuesday, May 5, 2020, during a news conference. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
May 05, 2020 - 4:35 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — California sued ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft on Tuesday, alleging they misclassified their drivers as independent contractors under the state's new labor law. Attorney General Xavier Becerra and the city attorneys of Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco announced the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 24, 2019, file photo, Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas., questions former special counsel Robert Mueller as he testifies before the House Intelligence Committee hearing on his report on Russian election interference, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 05, 2020 - 3:12 pm
Your daily look at nonvirus stories in the news: 1. CALIFORNIA SUES UBER AND LYFT: California is suing ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft, alleging they misclassified their drivers as independent contractors under the state’s new labor law. Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the lawsuit...
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FILE - In this file photo taken Feb. 19, 2020, Poland's President Andrzej Duda, center, campaigning for his re-election in Warsaw, Poland. The Polish government’s determination to move forward with the May 10, presidential election during the coronavirus pandemic by making it an all-postal vote is creating anxiety and anger, and critics say the plan threatens public health and democracy in Poland.(AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
May 04, 2020 - 9:18 am
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — The Polish official in charge of organizing the country's presidential election said Monday he doesn't believe it can take place Sunday as planned because the legislation to authorize an all-postal vote hasn't been approved yet. While an official announcement hasn't been made...
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FILE - In this April 20, 2020, file photo, resident physician Leslie Bottrell stands outside a room at an Intensive Care Unit as a nurse suctions the lungs of a COVID-19 patient at St. Joseph's Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y. COVID-19 could have stamped someone “uninsurable”  if not for the Affordable Care Act. The ban on insurers using preexisting conditions to deny coverage is a key part of the Obama-era law that the Trump administration still seeks to overturn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
May 03, 2020 - 9:17 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — COVID-19 could have stamped a person “uninsurable” if not for the Affordable Care Act. The ban on insurers using preexisting conditions to deny coverage is a key part of the Obama-era law that the Trump administration still seeks to overturn. Without the law, people who recovered...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, the NCAA headquarters is shown in Indianapolis. The NCAA is moving closer to permitting Division I college athletes to earn money from endorsements and sponsorship deals they can strike on their own. Recommendations for changes to NCAA rules that would permit athletes to earn money for their names, images and likeness are being reviewed by college sports administrators this week before being sent to the association's Board of Governors. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)
April 29, 2020 - 6:25 pm
For more than 60 years, NCAA leaders have insisted college athletes had to be amateurs and to be amateurs they could not be paid for being athletes — by anybody. That will no longer be the case. The NCAA announced Wednesday it is moving forward with a plan to allow college athletes to earn money...
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