Laws

FILE - In this Nov. 4, 2019, file photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, poses with Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam for a photo during a meeting in Shanghai, China. A sharp escalation of violence in Hong Kong has once again raised the question of how China's central government will respond. Experts said national security measures and deployment of the armed forces remain possibilities, though Beijing may just as likely allow destruction to continue unfolding. (Ju Peng/Xinhua via AP, File)
November 13, 2019 - 12:37 am
BEIJING (AP) — A sharp escalation of violence in Hong Kong is once again raising the question of how China's central government will respond: Will it intervene, or allow the chaos to persist? The Liaison Office, which represents mainland authorities in Hong Kong, said Wednesday that actions in the...
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FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 13, 2009 file photo a caravan of trucks from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, Calif., drive around Los Angeles City Hall during a protest against container fees being assessed against independent truckers. The California Trucking Association has filed what appears to be the first lawsuit challenging a sweeping new labor law that seeks to give wage and benefit protections to workers in the so-called gig economy, including rideshare drivers at companies such as Uber and Lyft. The federal lawsuit filed Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, contends that the legislation violates federal law and would deprive more than 70,000 independent truckers' of their ability to work. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
November 12, 2019 - 9:24 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Trucking Association on Tuesday filed what appears to be the first lawsuit challenging a sweeping new labor law that seeks to give wage and benefit protections to workers in the so-called gig economy, including rideshare drivers at companies such as Uber and...
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FILE - In this Nov. 4, 2019, file photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, poses with Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam for a photo during a meeting in Shanghai, China. A sharp escalation of violence in Hong Kong has once again raised the question of how China's central government will respond. Experts said national security measures and deployment of the armed forces remain possibilities, though Beijing may just as likely allow destruction to continue unfolding. (Ju Peng/Xinhua via AP, File)
November 12, 2019 - 8:51 pm
BEIJING (AP) — A sharp escalation of violence in Hong Kong is once again raising the question of how China's central government will respond: Will it deploy its armed forces, or allow the chaos and destruction to continue? Protests persisted Tuesday at university campuses and the central business...
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November 12, 2019 - 8:47 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Trucking Association on Tuesday filed what appears to be the first lawsuit challenging a sweeping new labor law that seeks to give wage and benefit protections to workers in the so-called gig economy, including rideshare drivers at companies such as Uber and...
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November 12, 2019 - 8:22 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Trucking Association has filed what appears to be the first lawsuit challenging a sweeping new labor law that seeks to give wage and benefit protections to workers in the so-called gig economy, including rideshare drivers at companies such as Uber and Lyft...
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November 08, 2019 - 4:53 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — In a story Nov. 6 about Virginia's elections, The Associated Press erroneously reported that 3.5 million voters cast ballots, twice as many as in 2015. At least 2.3 million voters cast ballots in the state's legislative races in 2019, an increase of more than 50 percent over...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2018, file photo, Olivier Niggli, world anti-doping agency (WADA) Director General, delivers his speech during the opening day of the 2018 WADA annual symposium, at the Swiss Tech Convention Center, in Lausanne, Switzerland. A key American delegate at the World Anti-Doping Agency meetings lashed out at the agency’s director for using government money in an attempt to reshape U.S. legislation designed to fight drugs in sports. At the WADA board meeting Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, Kendel Ehrlich of the U.S. Office of National Drug Control Policy seized on an Associated Press story from the previous day that described efforts by WADA and the International Olympic Committee to lobby for substantive changes to the Rodchenkov Act. (Jean-Christophe Bott/Keystone via AP, File)
November 07, 2019 - 4:52 pm
KATOWICE, Poland (AP) — A key American delegate at the World Anti-Doping Agency meetings lashed out at the agency's director for using government money in hopes of reshaping U.S. legislation designed to fight drugs in sports. At the WADA board meeting Thursday, Kendel Ehrlich of the U.S. Office of...
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Virginia Giovernor Ralph Northam, center, is surrounded by media outside his office at the State Capitol in Richmond, Va., Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019. Northam had just left a meeting with his Cabinet and was questioned about the previous night's election results which gave Democrats control of the Virginia House of Delegates and Senate. (Bob Brown/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)
November 06, 2019 - 7:34 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam promised Wednesday to ride a wave of voter dissatisfaction with President Donald Trump to turn the Old Dominion into a state where gun laws are stricter, the environment is cleaner and cities have greater leeway to take down Confederate statues. The...
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FILE - In this June 19, 2019 file photo, a dog taken from a property in Klingerstown, Pa., looks out from its cage during an animal cruelty investigation. Congress has passed a bill making certain types of animal cruelty a federal felony. (Jacqueline Dormer/Republican-Herald via AP)
November 06, 2019 - 3:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has passed a bill making certain types of animal cruelty a federal felony. The bill would expand a 2010 law that made creation or distribution of "animal crushing" videos illegal. The new bill would make the underlying acts of cruelty a federal crime. The Senate...
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November 06, 2019 - 3:33 pm
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Tradition has long had it that children born to families in Latin America receive two last names: That of their father, followed by that of their mother. Now that practice is being challenged in court. Colombia's Constitutional Court ruled Tuesday that the tradition violates...
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