Las Vegas mass shooting

March 07, 2018 - 11:32 pm
PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — Under the unforgiving Florida sun, the stuffed animals along the makeshift memorial are beginning to(?) fade. The prayer candles have melted, and the roses have withered. Now it's time to collect, archive and preserve the mementos that honor the 17 students and faculty who...
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Lydia Ringer, 16, a junior at Roosevelt High School in Seattle, holds a sign that reads "NRA - Not Right for America," Tuesday, March 6, 2018, as she attends a rally against gun violence at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. The rally was held on the same day Gov. Inslee was scheduled to sign a bill banning the sale and possession of gun bump stocks in the state of Washington. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
March 06, 2018 - 7:15 pm
OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Spurred by last year's mass shooting in Las Vegas, Washington on Tuesday became the latest in a handful of states to ban trigger devices that allow semi-automatic rifles to fire more rapidly. Gov. Jay Inslee signed the ban on bump stocks, calling it a "commonsense piece of...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018 file photo, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., asks a question of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin during a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. The silent majority may stop Congress from doing anything to address gun violence. They include most Republicans and some vulnerable Democrats who would rather avoid the gun debate altogether than risk drawing unwanted attention from the NRA on the right or the growing movement of gun control advocates on the left. The elected officials ran from the gun debate in recent days, and when forced to talk about the issue, offered only murky answers that left unclear their positions on key proposals. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
March 03, 2018 - 9:15 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — They crowded around the White House conference table this past week, lawmakers from California, Connecticut, Texas and Florida, eager to share their state's painful experience with gun violence. One key state was not represented. No one from Nevada, home to the deadliest shooting in...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018 file photo, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., asks a question of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin during a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. The silent majority may stop Congress from doing anything to address gun violence. They include most Republicans and some vulnerable Democrats who would rather avoid the gun debate altogether than risk drawing unwanted attention from the NRA on the right or the growing movement of gun control advocates on the left. The elected officials ran from the gun debate in recent days, and when forced to talk about the issue, offered only murky answers that left unclear their positions on key proposals. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
March 03, 2018 - 9:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — They crowded around the White House conference table this past week, lawmakers from California, Connecticut, Texas and Florida, eager to share their state's painful experience with gun violence. One key state was not represented. No one from Nevada, home to the deadliest shooting in...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018 file photo, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., asks a question of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin during a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. The silent majority may stop Congress from doing anything to address gun violence. They include most Republicans and some vulnerable Democrats who would rather avoid the gun debate altogether than risk drawing unwanted attention from the NRA on the right or the growing movement of gun control advocates on the left. The elected officials ran from the gun debate in recent days, and when forced to talk about the issue, offered only murky answers that left unclear their positions on key proposals. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
March 03, 2018 - 6:09 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — They crowded around the White House conference table this past week, lawmakers from California, Connecticut, Texas and Florida, eager to share their state's painful experience with gun violence. One key state was not represented. No one from Nevada, home to the deadliest shooting in...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018 file photo, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., asks a question of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin during a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. The silent majority may stop Congress from doing anything to address gun violence. They include most Republicans and some vulnerable Democrats who would rather avoid the gun debate altogether than risk drawing unwanted attention from the NRA on the right or the growing movement of gun control advocates on the left. The elected officials ran from the gun debate in recent days, and when forced to talk about the issue, offered only murky answers that left unclear their positions on key proposals. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
March 03, 2018 - 2:48 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — They crowded around the White House conference table this past week, lawmakers from California, Connecticut, Texas and Florida, eager to share their state's painful experience with gun violence. One key state was not represented. No one from Nevada, home to the deadliest shooting in...
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FILE - In this Oct. 6, 2017, file photo, Manuela Barela passes crosses set up to honor those killed during the mass shooting in Las Vegas. A $31.5 million victims' fund that started as an online GoFundMe effort plans to pay $275,000 to families of the 58 people killed in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. The Las Vegas Victims Fund announced Friday, March 2, 2018, that the maximum $275,000 also will be paid to 10 other people who were paralyzed or suffered permanent brain damage in the Oct. 1 shooting on the Las Vegas Strip. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
March 02, 2018 - 7:23 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A $31.5 million victims' fund that started as a GoFundMe effort announced plans Friday to pay $275,000 to the families of each of the 58 people killed in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. The Las Vegas Victims Fund said the maximum $275,000 also will be paid to 10...
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This Thursday, March 1, 2018 shows a vandalized billboard near Interstate 15 in Las Vegas. The advertisement inviting tourists to fire an assault-style rifle, which originally said "Shoot a .50 caliber only $29," was changed to say, "Shoot A School Kid Only $29." (Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP)
March 01, 2018 - 8:30 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A guerrilla art collective claimed credit Thursday for changing a freeway-side billboard inviting Las Vegas tourists to fire high-powered assault-style rifles to read, "Shoot A School Kid Only $29." The altered advertisement, which had said "Shoot a .50 caliber only $29," was taken...
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FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2017 file photo, Eric Paddock holds a photo of himself, at left, and his brother, Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock, at right, outside his home in Orlando, Fla. A Nevada judge on Thursday, March 1, 2018 named a forensic finance officer to tally the assets left by Stephen Paddock, who killed himself after unleashing the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history on the Las Vegas Strip. Eric Paddock wants the assets distributed to victims. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
March 01, 2018 - 5:15 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A veteran forensic financial consultant was appointed Thursday to tally the assets left by the man who killed himself after unleashing the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history on the Las Vegas Strip. Certified public accountant Larry Bertsch was instructed by Clark County...
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This Thursday, March 1, 2018 shows a vandalized billboard near Interstate 15 in Las Vegas. The advertisement inviting tourists to fire an assault-style rifle, which originally said "Shoot a .50 caliber only $29," was changed to say, "Shoot A School Kid Only $29." (Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP)
March 01, 2018 - 2:59 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A freeway-side billboard for a Las Vegas gun range was vandalized late Wednesday or before dawn Thursday to change an advertisement inviting tourists to fire an assault-style rifle to say, "Shoot A School Kid Only $29." The message, which had said "Shoot a .50 caliber only $29,"...
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