Las Vegas mass shooting

FILE - In this April 1, 2018, file photo, people carry flowers as they walk near the Mandalay Bay hotel and casino during a vigil for victims and survivors of a mass shooting in Las Vegas. Casino giant MGM Resorts is telling federal regulators it thinks it might pay up to $800 million to settle liability lawsuits stemming from the October 2017 mass shooting that became the deadliest in modern U.S. history. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
May 16, 2019 - 6:32 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Casino giant MGM Resorts told federal regulators Thursday it might pay up to $800 million to settle liability lawsuits stemming from the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas — the deadliest in modern U.S. history. "The company believes it is reasonably possible that a settlement will be...
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May 16, 2019 - 6:11 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Casino giant MGM Resorts told federal regulators Thursday it might pay up to $800 million to settle liability lawsuits stemming from the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas — the deadliest in modern U.S. history. "The company believes it is reasonably possible that a settlement will be...
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This combination of 2015, 2018 and 2019 photos shows CBS's John Dickerson, Norah O'Donnell and Gayle King, right. CBS News is replacing its evening anchor and revamping its morning show lineup as it seeks to boost ratings. The network announced Monday, May 6, 2019, on "CBS This Morning" co-host Norah O'Donnell will replace Jeff Glor as anchor of the "CBS Evening News" this summer. Gayle King will remain co-host of "CBS This Morning." John Dickerson, who hopscotched from political director to "Face the Nation" moderator in 2015 to "CBS This Morning" as Rose's replacement in January 2018, will become a correspondent for "60 Minutes." (Photo by Richard Shotwell, Brent N. Clarke, Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
May 06, 2019 - 9:37 pm
Norah O'Donnell will become anchor and managing editor of the "CBS Evening News" and Gayle King is getting two new morning show co-hosts as CBS News seeks to boost the programs' ratings and put a tumultuous, scandal-scarred period behind it. The changes announced Monday were orchestrated by Susan...
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May 06, 2019 - 7:20 pm
Norah O'Donnell will become anchor and managing editor of the "CBS Evening News" and Gayle King is getting two new morning show co-hosts as CBS News seeks to boost the programs' ratings and put a tumultuous, scandal-scarred period behind it. The changes announced Monday were orchestrated by Susan...
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In this May 23, 2017 photo provided by Matthew Westmoreland, Riley Howell, right, is seen. Authorities say Howell, 21, was killed after he tackled a gunman who opened fire in a classroom at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. Police said a few students, including Howell, died and several others were injured. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney said Howell's actions likely saved the lives of other students. (Matthew Westmoreland via AP)
May 01, 2019 - 11:18 pm
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina college student tackled a gunman who opened fire in his classroom, saving others' lives but losing his own in the process, police said Wednesday. Riley Howell, 21, was among students gathered for end-of-year presentations in an anthropology class at the...
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David Belnap, a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, displays a t-shirt in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, May 1, 2019, in support of Riley Howell, a classmate who was killed while confronting a gunman inside a classroom on Tuesday. Howell was one of two people killed in the shooting. (AP Photo/Skip Foreman)
May 01, 2019 - 8:07 pm
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina college student tackled a gunman who opened fire in his classroom, saving others' lives but losing his own in the process, police said Wednesday. Riley Howell, 21, was among students gathered for end-of-year presentations in an anthropology class at the...
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In this May 23, 2017 photo provided by Matthew Westmoreland, Riley Howell, right, is seen. Authorities say Howell, 21, was killed after he tackled a gunman who opened fire in a classroom at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. Police said a few students, including Howell, died and several others were injured. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney said Howell's actions likely saved the lives of other students. (Matthew Westmoreland via AP)
May 01, 2019 - 7:58 pm
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina college student tackled a gunman who opened fire in his classroom, saving others' lives but losing his own in the process, police said Wednesday. Riley Howell, 21, was among students gathered for end-of-year presentations in an anthropology class at the...
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In this Sept. 1, 2017 photo provided by Matthew Westmoreland, Riley Howell, right, is seen. Authorities say Howell, 21, was killed after he tackled a gunman who opened fire in a classroom at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. Police said a few students, including Howell, died and several others were injured. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney said Howell's actions likely saved the lives of other students. (Matthew Westmoreland via AP)
May 01, 2019 - 5:27 pm
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina college student tackled a gunman who opened fire in a classroom, saving others' lives but losing his own in the process, the police chief said Wednesday. Riley Howell, 21, was among the students gathered for end-of-year presentations in an anthropology class...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2017, file photo, a device called a "bump stock" is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah. In the days and weeks leading up to the ban on bump stocks that took effect Tuesday, March 26, 2019, tens of thousands of the devices were destroyed by owners or handed over to authorities. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
March 28, 2019 - 7:08 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The largest supplier of bump stocks turned in its entire remaining inventory to be destroyed — some 60,000 devices. Washington state's buyback program was so popular it ran out of money. One dealer held a "Viking funeral" for his last bump stock, pouring a can of beer on it and...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2017, file photo, a device called a "bump stock" is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah. In the days and weeks leading up to the ban on bump stocks that took effect Tuesday, March 26, 2019, tens of thousands of the devices were destroyed by owners or handed over to authorities. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
March 28, 2019 - 6:55 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The largest supplier of bump stocks turned in its entire remaining inventory to be destroyed — some 60,000 devices. Washington state's buyback program was so popular it ran out of money. One dealer held a "Viking funeral" for his last bump stock, pouring a can of beer on it and...
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