Land management

FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2017 file photo Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks on the Trump Administration's energy policy at the Heritage Foundation in Washington. Zinke wants to move more Interior Department employees out of Washington and into the field, closer to the public lands and resources they manage, saying that will lead to improved, decentralized decision-making. More than 90 percent of the department's employees already work outside the Washington area, and some retired department employees say the agency already has a well-established decentralized decision-making process. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik,File)
February 28, 2018 - 4:20 pm
DENVER (AP) — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's plan for a major realignment to put more of his department's decision-makers in the field has a fundamental flaw in the eyes of some who spent their careers making those decisions: They're already out there. Eleven former Interior Department...
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FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2017 file photo Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks on the Trump Administration's energy policy at the Heritage Foundation in Washington. Zinke wants to move more Interior Department employees out of Washington and into the field, closer to the public lands and resources they manage, saying that will lead to improved, decentralized decision-making. More than 90 percent of the department's employees already work outside the Washington area, and some retired department employees say the agency already has a well-established decentralized decision-making process. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik,File)
February 28, 2018 - 9:18 am
DENVER (AP) — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's plan for a major realignment to put more of his department's decision-makers in the field has a fundamental flaw, in the eyes of some who spent their careers making those decisions: They're already out there. Eleven former Interior Department...
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FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2018, file photo, U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks to reporters at a conservation announcement at the Western Conservation and Hunting Expo in Salt Lake City. On Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, Zinke will announce he will revise proposed new regional boundaries for the Interior Department as part of a major reorganization of the agency. The new boundaries would more closely follow state lines, a change from his earlier proposal, which largely ignored state boundaries and relied mostly on rivers and other natural features. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
February 23, 2018 - 5:02 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is revamping a planned sweeping overhaul of his department with a new organizational map that more closely follows state lines instead of the natural boundaries he initially proposed, he told The Associated Press on Friday in an exclusive...
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