Lakes

FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2011 file photo visitors view the dramatic bend in the Colorado River at the popular Horseshoe Bend in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, in Page, Ariz. Some 40 million people in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming draw from the Colorado River and its tributaries. Much of that originates as snow. A wet winter likely will fend off mandated water shortages for states in the U.S. West that rely on the river but won't erase the impact of climate change. Climate change means the region is still getting drier and hotter. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:56 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Extreme swings in weather are expected as part of a changing climate, something Brad Udall, a water and climate research scientist at Colorado State University, has called "weather whiplash." The drought-stricken Southwest got a reprieve this year with average and above-average snowfall following a year that sent many states into extreme drought. Nearly empty reservoirs quickly rose, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the largest man-made reservoirs in the country that hold back Colorado River water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:53 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
Read More
FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Extreme swings in weather are expected as part of a changing climate, something Brad Udall, a water and climate research scientist at Colorado State University, has called "weather whiplash." The drought-stricken Southwest got a reprieve this year with average and above-average snowfall following a year that sent many states into extreme drought. Nearly empty reservoirs quickly rose, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the largest man-made reservoirs in the country that hold back Colorado River water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:43 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
Read More
FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Extreme swings in weather are expected as part of a changing climate, something Brad Udall, a water and climate research scientist at Colorado State University, has called "weather whiplash." The drought-stricken Southwest got a reprieve this year with average and above-average snowfall following a year that sent many states into extreme drought. Nearly empty reservoirs quickly rose, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the largest man-made reservoirs in the country that hold back Colorado River water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:14 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
Read More
FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread far and wide. Some experts have questioned whether there’s enough plankton in the lake to sustain the invasive carp away from shoreline areas. But the new report released Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, by University of Michigan scientists says despite a drop-off of plankton caused by exotic mussels, the voracious carp could feed on other organic material when venturing into deeper waters. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
August 12, 2019 - 2:42 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Asian carp are likely to find enough food to spread farther if they establish breeding populations in Lake Michigan, reinforcing the importance of preventing the invasive fish from gaining a foothold, scientists said in a paper released Monday. A study led by University...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread far and wide. Some experts have questioned whether there’s enough plankton in the lake to sustain the invasive carp away from shoreline areas. But the new report released Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, by University of Michigan scientists says despite a drop-off of plankton caused by exotic mussels, the voracious carp could feed on other organic material when venturing into deeper waters. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
August 12, 2019 - 11:45 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Asian carp are likely to find enough food to spread farther if they establish breeding populations in Lake Michigan, reinforcing the importance of preventing the invasive fish from gaining a foothold, scientists said in a paper released Monday. A study led by University...
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From left, Democratic president candidate and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., stand together before the Iowa Democratic Wing Ding at the Surf Ballroom, Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, in Clear Lake, Iowa. (AP Photo/John Locher)
August 09, 2019 - 8:02 pm
CLEAR LAKE, Iowa (AP) — The Latest on nearly all 2020 Democratic presidential candidates speaking at Iowa's "Wing Ding" fundraiser (all times local): 7 p.m. Environmental activist and new presidential candidate Tom Steyer is launching his first pitch to Iowa voters by embracing his status as a...
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From left, Democratic president candidate and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., stand together before the Iowa Democratic Wing Ding at the Surf Ballroom, Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, in Clear Lake, Iowa. (AP Photo/John Locher)
August 09, 2019 - 7:27 pm
CLEAR LAKE, Iowa (AP) — The Latest on nearly all 2020 Democratic presidential candidates speaking at Iowa's "Wing Ding" fundraiser (all times local): 6:25 p.m. Democratic presidential hopefuls have begun speaking at the "Wing Ding" party fundraiser in northern Iowa, with Sen. Amy Klobuchar of...
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FILE - In this July 26, 2019, file photo, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer speaks during a session at the National Governor's Association conference in Salt Lake City. Five Democratic governors of states in the Great Lakes region want candidates in next year's presidential election, including President Trump, to back a plan for protecting their freshwater resources. Led by Whitmer, the governors on Monday, July 29, 2019, proposed a six-point platform that seeks increases in federal spending on water treatment infrastructure and environmental cleanups. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
July 29, 2019 - 2:47 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Five Democratic governors of states in the Great Lakes region Monday urged the candidates in next year's presidential election to support a plan for safeguarding their shared waters by boosting federal spending on treatment plants and environmental cleanups. Led by...
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FILE - In this July 26, 2019, file photo, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer speaks during a session at the National Governor's Association conference in Salt Lake City. Five Democratic governors of states in the Great Lakes region want candidates in next year's presidential election, including President Trump, to back a plan for protecting their freshwater resources. Led by Whitmer, the governors on Monday, July 29, 2019, proposed a six-point platform that seeks increases in federal spending on water treatment infrastructure and environmental cleanups. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
July 29, 2019 - 1:21 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Five Democratic governors of states in the Great Lakes region Monday urged the candidates in next year's presidential election to support a plan for safeguarding their shared waters by boosting federal spending on treatment plants and environmental cleanups. Led by...
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