Judiciary

Protesters are arrested as they block the streets near the Capitol and the Supreme Court in Washington, Thursday, March 1, 2018. It’s taken just two weeks for Washington’s battle over helping young immigrants to fade from blistering to back-burner. Congress now seems likely to do little or nothing this election year on an effort that’s been eclipsed by Congress’ new focus on guns, bloodied by Senate defeats and relegated to B-level urgency by a Supreme Court ruling. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
March 02, 2018 - 1:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — It's taken just two weeks for Washington's immigration battle to fade from blistering to back-burner. Lawmakers now seem likely to do little or nothing this election year on an effort that's been eclipsed by Congress' new focus on guns, bloodied by Senate defeats and relegated to...
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Protesters are arrested as they block the streets near the Capitol and the Supreme Court in Washington, Thursday, March 1, 2018. It’s taken just two weeks for Washington’s battle over helping young immigrants to fade from blistering to back-burner. Congress now seems likely to do little or nothing this election year on an effort that’s been eclipsed by Congress’ new focus on guns, bloodied by Senate defeats and relegated to B-level urgency by a Supreme Court ruling. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
March 02, 2018 - 1:47 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — It's taken just two weeks for Washington's immigration battle to fade from blistering to back-burner. Lawmakers now seem likely to do little or nothing this election year on an effort that's been eclipsed by Congress' new focus on guns. The immigration effort has also been...
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March 02, 2018 - 12:48 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is looking for ways to deal with a recurring frustration: individual federal judges who have put the brakes on one major administration policy after another. The administration is telling the Supreme Court in a case about President Donald Trump's travel...
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In this Feb. 22, 2018 photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions listens during a meeting between President Donald Trump in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. The administration is telling the Supreme Court in the travel ban case that judges are increasingly using what are called nationwide injunctions to stop "a federal policy everywhere." The Justice Department says the high court should "reject the deeply misguided practice," which has also been used against the administration’s crackdown on “sanctuary cities,” President Donald Trump’s announced ban on transgender military service members and, most recently, the effort to end legal protections for young immigrants. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
March 02, 2018 - 12:46 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is looking for ways to deal with a recurring frustration: individual federal judges who have put the brakes on one major administration policy after another. The administration is telling the Supreme Court in a case about President Donald Trump's travel...
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FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2017 file photo, author Daniel Handler attends the world premiere of Netflix's "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" in New York. Recent accusations of sexual harassment against Handler have cost him the role of commencement speaker at Wesleyan University. He will be replaced by Anita Hill, who testified in 1991 that then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her. She's now a professor at Brandeis University and already was scheduled to receive an honorary degree at Wesleyan's May graduation ceremony. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)
March 01, 2018 - 6:32 pm
Children's author Daniel Handler has canceled his commencement speech at Wesleyan University amid allegations of sexual harassment, the school announced Thursday. Instead, the May graduation speech will be given by Anita Hill, who drew attention in 1991 when she testified that then-Supreme Court...
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March 01, 2018 - 5:52 pm
Children's author Daniel Handler has canceled his commencement speech at Wesleyan University amid allegations of sexual harassment, the school announced Thursday. Instead, the May graduation speech will be given by Anita Hill, who drew attention in 1991 when she testified that then-Supreme Court...
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FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2017 file photo, Eric Paddock holds a photo of himself, at left, and his brother, Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock, at right, outside his home in Orlando, Fla. A Nevada judge on Thursday, March 1, 2018 named a forensic finance officer to tally the assets left by Stephen Paddock, who killed himself after unleashing the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history on the Las Vegas Strip. Eric Paddock wants the assets distributed to victims. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
March 01, 2018 - 5:15 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A veteran forensic financial consultant was appointed Thursday to tally the assets left by the man who killed himself after unleashing the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history on the Las Vegas Strip. Certified public accountant Larry Bertsch was instructed by Clark County...
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March 01, 2018 - 5:15 pm
MIDDLETOWN, Conn. (AP) — Recent accusations of sexual harassment against children's author Daniel Handler apparently have cost him the role of commencement speaker at Wesleyan University. Students and alumni had protested Handler's selection, and the private school in Connecticut announced his...
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FILE - This combination of file photos provided by the Arkansas Department of Correction shows death-row inmates Bruce Earl Ward, left, and Don William Davis. The state Supreme Court on Thursday, March 1, 2018, said the men were not entitled to special assistance from mental health professionals during their trials two decades ago and lifted stays of executions they had put in place for the men last April. (Arkansas Department of Correction via AP, File)
March 01, 2018 - 5:07 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas' Supreme Court on Thursday lifted stays of execution for two condemned killers, saying they were not entitled to special assistance from mental health professionals before and during their trials. Bruce Ward and Don Davis were among eight prisoners scheduled to die...
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FILE - This combination of file photos provided by the Arkansas Department of Correction shows death-row inmates Bruce Earl Ward, left, and Don William Davis. The state Supreme Court on Thursday, March 1, 2018, said the men were not entitled to special assistance from mental health professionals during their trials two decades ago and lifted stays of executions they had put in place for the men last April. (Arkansas Department of Correction via AP, File)
March 01, 2018 - 4:56 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas' Supreme Court on Thursday lifted stays of execution for two condemned killers, saying they were not entitled to special assistance from mental health professionals before and during their trials. Bruce Ward and Don Davis were among eight prisoners scheduled to die...
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