Judicial appointments and nominations

FILE - In this Thursday, March 14, 2019, file photo, Roger Stone, an associate of President Donald Trump, leaves U.S. District Court after a court status conference on his seven charges: one count of obstruction of an official proceeding, five counts of false statements and one count of witness tampering, in Washington. On Friday, April 12, 2019, Stone asked a federal judge to compel the Justice Department to turn over a full copy of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the Russia investigation as part of discovery in his criminal case. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
April 13, 2019 - 6:17 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's longtime confidant, Roger Stone, asked a federal judge Friday to compel the Justice Department to turn over a full copy of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on the Russia investigation as part of discovery in his criminal case. Stone has pleaded not...
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FILE - In this Thursday, March 14, 2019, file photo, Roger Stone, an associate of President Donald Trump, leaves U.S. District Court after a court status conference on his seven charges: one count of obstruction of an official proceeding, five counts of false statements and one count of witness tampering, in Washington. On Friday, April 12, 2019, Stone asked a federal judge to compel the Justice Department to turn over a full copy of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the Russia investigation as part of discovery in his criminal case. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
April 13, 2019 - 12:21 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's longtime confidant, Roger Stone, asked a federal judge Friday to compel the Justice Department to turn over a full copy of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on the Russia investigation as part of discovery in his criminal case. Stone has pleaded not...
Read More
April 12, 2019 - 11:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's longtime confidant, Roger Stone, asked a federal judge Friday to compel the Justice Department to turn over a full copy of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on the Russia investigation as part of discovery in his criminal case. Stone has pleaded not...
Read More
April 12, 2019 - 10:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A grand jury witness in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation is asking a federal appeals court to determine whether he still needs to testify now that the Russia probe has concluded. Andrew Miller, a former aide to Trump confidante Roger Stone, made the request Friday in...
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FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2019, file photo, anti-abortion activists protest outside of the U.S. Supreme Court, during the March for Life in Washington. Emboldened by the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court, anti-abortion lawmakers and activists in numerous states are pushing near-total bans on the procedure in a deliberate frontal attack on Roe v. Wade. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
April 10, 2019 - 1:18 pm
Emboldened by the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court, anti-abortion lawmakers and activists in numerous states are pushing near-total bans on the procedure in a deliberate frontal attack on Roe v. Wade. Mississippi and Kentucky have passed laws that would ban most abortions after a...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2019, file photo, anti-abortion activists protest outside of the U.S. Supreme Court, during the March for Life in Washington. Emboldened by the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court, anti-abortion lawmakers and activists in numerous states are pushing near-total bans on the procedure in a deliberate frontal attack on Roe v. Wade. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
April 10, 2019 - 11:35 am
Emboldened by the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court, anti-abortion lawmakers and activists in numerous states are pushing near-total bans on the procedure in a deliberate frontal attack on Roe v. Wade. Mississippi and Kentucky have passed laws that would ban most abortions after a...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2019, file photo, anti-abortion activists protest outside of the U.S. Supreme Court, during the March for Life in Washington. Emboldened by the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court, anti-abortion lawmakers and activists in numerous states are pushing near-total bans on the procedure in a deliberate frontal attack on Roe v. Wade. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
April 10, 2019 - 6:39 am
Emboldened by the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court, anti-abortion lawmakers and activists in numerous states are pushing near-total bans on the procedure in a deliberate frontal attack on Roe v. Wade. Mississippi and Kentucky have passed laws that would ban most abortions after a...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2019, file photo, anti-abortion activists protest outside of the U.S. Supreme Court, during the March for Life in Washington. Emboldened by the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court, anti-abortion lawmakers and activists in numerous states are pushing near-total bans on the procedure in a deliberate frontal attack on Roe v. Wade. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
April 10, 2019 - 3:26 am
Emboldened by the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court, anti-abortion lawmakers and activists in numerous states are pushing near-total bans on the procedure in a deliberate frontal attack on Roe v. Wade. Mississippi and Kentucky have passed laws that would ban most abortions after a...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington. One of the only jobs McConnell ever wanted was to be in the Senate. But the majority leader is steadily changing the way the chamber operates in pursuit of a greater prize: reshaping the judiciary. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
April 07, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Mitch McConnell says the Senate will be in the "personnel business" this year. But the majority leader's focus on confirming President Donald Trump's nominees is coming at the expense of any big legislative priorities. Nearly 100 days into the new Congress, the drive to confirm is...
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FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington. One of the only jobs McConnell ever wanted was to be in the Senate. But the majority leader is steadily changing the way the chamber operates in pursuit of a greater prize: reshaping the judiciary. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
April 07, 2019 - 8:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Mitch McConnell says the Senate will be in the "personnel business" this year. But the majority leader's focus on confirming President Donald Trump's nominees is coming at the expense of any big legislative priorities. Nearly 100 days into the new Congress, the drive to confirm is...
Read More

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