Journalism

This image taken from video provided by CNN shows CNN reporter Clarissa Ward. Ward says her story this week about Russian involvement in the Central African Republic came with a price: she was trailed during her reporting and made the subject of a 15-minute propaganda video denigrating her work. "This was very clearly an attempt to discredit and intimidate us," Ward, CNN's chief international correspondent, said Friday, Aug. 16, 2019. (CNN via AP)
August 16, 2019 - 3:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — CNN's Clarissa Ward says her story this week about Russian involvement in the Central African Republic came with a price: she was trailed during her reporting and made the subject of a 15-minute propaganda video denigrating her work. Ward said she was shaken by the experience but it...
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This image shows a tweeted version of The New York Times front page for Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, with a headline that reads: "“TRUMP URGES UNITY VS. RACISM." The headline, in the paper's first edition, caused an outcry that triggered a new debate over how such tragedies should be covered. (The New York Times via AP)
August 06, 2019 - 10:45 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Revulsion over the weekend's twin mass shootings and the nagging sense that it's all an inconclusive rerun has frustrated the news media and those who rely upon it — and triggered the stirrings of a new debate over how such tragedies should be covered. "It's time for journalists to...
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This image shows a tweeted version of The New York Times front page for Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, with a headline that reads: "“TRUMP URGES UNITY VS. RACISM." The headline, in the paper's first edition, caused an outcry that triggered a new debate over how such tragedies should be covered. (The New York Times via AP)
August 06, 2019 - 7:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Revulsion over the weekend's twin mass shootings and the nagging sense that it's all an inconclusive rerun has frustrated the news media and those who rely upon it — and triggered the stirrings of a new debate over how such tragedies should be covered. "It's time for journalists to...
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This image shows a tweeted version of The New York Times front page for Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, with a headline that reads: "“TRUMP URGES UNITY VS. RACISM." The headline, in the paper's first edition, caused an outcry that triggered a new debate over how such tragedies should be covered. (The New York Times via AP)
August 06, 2019 - 6:00 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Revulsion over the weekend's twin mass shootings and the nagging sense that it's all an inconclusive rerun has frustrated the news media and those who rely upon it — and triggered the stirrings of a new debate over how such tragedies should be covered. "It's time for journalists to...
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People gather outside the district court in Stockholm, Thursday Aug. 1, 2019. American rapper A$AP Rocky pleaded not guilty to assault as his trial in Sweden opened Tuesday, a month after a street fight that landed him in jail and became a topic of U.S.-Swedish diplomacy. (Fredrik Persson/TT News Agency via AP)
August 01, 2019 - 6:14 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — American rapper A$AP Rocky is set to testify Thursday on the second day of a trial in Sweden, where he is accused of assault in an alleged street fight. The trial has created a stir in U.S.-Swedish diplomatic relations after President Donald Trump weighed in on the case in support...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 21, 2018 file photo Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson talks to a British armed forces serviceman based in Orzysz, in northeastern Poland, during a ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and following talks on security with his Polish counterpart Jacek Czaputowicz in Warsaw, Poland. Boris Johnson aspires to be a modern-day Winston Churchill. Critics fear he's a British Donald Trump. Johnson won the contest to lead the governing Conservative Party on Tuesday July 23, 2019, and is set to be asked Wednesday by Queen Elizabeth II to become Britain's next prime minister. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski, File)
July 23, 2019 - 10:12 am
LONDON (AP) — Here are five things you may not know about Boris Johnson, who is set to become Britain's next prime minister on Wednesday: HE HASN'T ALWAYS BEEN SO CONFIDENT While Johnson is known for his booming voice, boisterous behavior and creative use of language (including Latin and Greek), he...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 21, 2018 file photo Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson talks to a British armed forces serviceman based in Orzysz, in northeastern Poland, during a ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and following talks on security with his Polish counterpart Jacek Czaputowicz in Warsaw, Poland. Boris Johnson aspires to be a modern-day Winston Churchill. Critics fear he's a British Donald Trump. Johnson won the contest to lead the governing Conservative Party on Tuesday July 23, 2019, and is set to be asked Wednesday by Queen Elizabeth II to become Britain's next prime minister. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski, File)
July 23, 2019 - 7:29 am
LONDON (AP) — Here are five things you may not know about Boris Johnson, who is set to become Britain's next prime minister : HE HASN'T ALWAYS BEEN SUCH A CONFIDENT CHARACTER: While Johnson is known for his booming voice, boisterous behavior and creative use of language (including Latin and Greek...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a Made in America showcase event on the South Lawn of the White House, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
July 15, 2019 - 5:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Republicans remained largely silent after President Donald Trump said over the weekend that four women of color in Congress should "go back" to the countries they came from. By Monday, some in the party were speaking up. Several GOP senators, and some House Republicans, said...
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July 10, 2019 - 5:20 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department said Wednesday it has terminated support for an online project aimed at fighting Iranian disinformation after it tweeted harsh criticism of individual human rights workers, academics and journalists, some of whom are U.S. citizens. Lea Gabrielle, the head of...
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July 10, 2019 - 5:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department said Wednesday it has terminated support for an online project aimed at fighting Iranian disinformation after it tweeted harsh criticism of individual human rights workers, academics and journalists, some of whom are U.S. citizens. Lea Gabrielle, the head of...
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