Islam

December 19, 2018 - 5:48 am
PARIS (AP) — The European Court of Human Rights has ruled that Greece violated a prohibition on discrimination by applying Islamic religious law to an inheritance dispute among members of the country's Muslim minority. The court ruled Wednesday that Greece had violated the European Convention on...
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This recent but undated photo, released Monday, Dec. 17, 2018 by the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Sacramento, Calif., shows Ali Hassan with his dying 2-year-old son Abdullah in a Sacramento hospital. The boy's Yemeni mother, blocked by the Trump administration's travel ban, has won her fight for a waiver that would allow her to travel to California to see her son. Basim Elkarra of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Sacramento said Shaima Swileh was granted a visa Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018, and will be flying to San Francisco on Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2018. (Council on American-Islamic Relations via AP)
December 18, 2018 - 5:52 pm
A Yemeni mother on Tuesday won her fight for a waiver from the Trump administration's travel ban that would allow her to go to California to see her dying 2-year-old son. Shaima Swileh planned to fly to San Francisco on Wednesday after the U.S. State Department granted her a visa, said Basim...
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This recent but undated photo, released Monday, Dec. 17, 2018 by the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Sacramento, Calif., shows Ali Hassan with his dying 2-year-old son Abdullah in a Sacramento hospital. The boy's Yemeni mother, blocked by the Trump administration's travel ban, has won her fight for a waiver that would allow her to travel to California to see her son. Basim Elkarra of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Sacramento said Shaima Swileh was granted a visa Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018, and will be flying to San Francisco on Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2018. (Council on American-Islamic Relations via AP)
December 18, 2018 - 5:05 pm
A Yemeni mother on Tuesday won her fight for a waiver from the Trump administration's travel ban that would allow her to go to California to see her dying 2-year-old son. Shaima Swileh planned to fly to San Francisco on Wednesday after the U.S. State Department granted her a visa, said Basim...
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This recent but undated photo, released Monday, Dec. 17, 2018 by the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Sacramento, Calif., shows Ali Hassan with his dying 2-year-old son Abdullah in a Sacramento hospital. The boy's Yemeni mother, blocked by the Trump administration's travel ban, has won her fight for a waiver that would allow her to travel to California to see her son. Basim Elkarra of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Sacramento said Shaima Swileh was granted a visa Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018, and will be flying to San Francisco on Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2018. (Council on American-Islamic Relations via AP)
December 18, 2018 - 5:01 pm
A Yemeni mother on Tuesday won her fight for a waiver from the Trump administration's travel ban that would allow her to go to California to see her dying 2-year-old son. Shaima Swileh planned to fly to San Francisco on Wednesday after the U.S. State Department granted her a visa, said Basim...
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A soldier allied to Yemen's internationally recognized government stands guard at the fish market in Aden, Yemen, Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018. A sense of normalcy has returned to Aden, now the seat of power for Yemen's internationally recognized government, but many challenges remain for bringing a lasting peace to the Arab world's poorest country. (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell)
December 13, 2018 - 11:59 am
ADEN, Yemen (AP) — Yemen's government nearly saw itself pushed into the sea by advancing rebels here three years ago. Now the port city of Aden shows the challenges that will likely still plague the nation following any potential peace agreement. Bursts of heavy machine gun fire still punctuates...
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December 10, 2018 - 8:26 am
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey's state-run news agency says prosecutors are seeking maximum 15-year prison terms for five journalists of an opposition newspaper, intensifying concerns over authorities' crackdown on news coverage critical of the government. Anadolu Agency reported Monday that...
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This undated photo provided by Ablikim Abliz, shows his uncle's family posing with an unknown Han Chinese man, second from the right, in Istanbul, Turkey. Abliz heard the Han Chinese man was part of a government homestay program meant to monitor his relatives, part of a broader crackdown on religious expression in China's far western region of Xinjiang. More than a million Chinese civil servants have been assigned to move into the homes of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities, spending weeks as uninvited guests. While government notices about the "Pair Up and Become Family" program portray it as an affectionate cultural exchange, exiled Uighurs living in Turkey said their loved ones saw the campaign as a chilling intrusion, aimed at coercing Uighurs into living secular lives like the Han majority. (Ablikim Abliz via AP)
November 30, 2018 - 12:02 pm
ISTANBUL (AP) — The two women in the photograph were smiling, but Halmurat Idris knew something was terribly wrong. One was his 39-year-old sister; standing at her side was an elderly woman Idris did not know. Their grins were tight-lipped, mirthless. Her sister had posted the picture on a social...
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This undated photo provided by Ablikim Abliz, shows his uncle's family posing with an unknown Han Chinese man, second from the right, in Istanbul, Turkey. Abliz heard the Han Chinese man was part of a government homestay program meant to monitor his relatives, part of a broader crackdown on religious expression in China's far western region of Xinjiang. More than a million Chinese civil servants have been assigned to move into the homes of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities, spending weeks as uninvited guests. While government notices about the "Pair Up and Become Family" program portray it as an affectionate cultural exchange, exiled Uighurs living in Turkey said their loved ones saw the campaign as a chilling intrusion, aimed at coercing Uighurs into living secular lives like the Han majority. (Ablikim Abliz via AP)
November 30, 2018 - 9:27 am
ISTANBUL (AP) — The two women in the photograph were smiling, but Halmurat Idris knew something was terribly wrong. One was his 39-year-old sister; standing at her side was an elderly woman Idris did not know. Their grins were tight-lipped, mirthless. Her sister had posted the picture on a social...
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This undated photo provided by Ablikim Abliz, shows his uncle's family posing with an unknown Han Chinese man, second from the right, in Istanbul, Turkey. Abliz heard the Han Chinese man was part of a government homestay program meant to monitor his relatives, part of a broader crackdown on religious expression in China's far western region of Xinjiang. More than a million Chinese civil servants have been assigned to move into the homes of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities, spending weeks as uninvited guests. While government notices about the "Pair Up and Become Family" program portray it as an affectionate cultural exchange, exiled Uighurs living in Turkey said their loved ones saw the campaign as a chilling intrusion, aimed at coercing Uighurs into living secular lives like the Han majority. (Ablikim Abliz via AP)
November 30, 2018 - 5:15 am
ISTANBUL (AP) — The two women in the photograph were smiling, but Halmurat Idris knew something was terribly wrong. One was his 39-year-old sister; standing at her side was an elderly woman Idris did not know. Their grins were tight-lipped, mirthless. Her sister had posted the picture on a social...
Read More
This undated photo provided by Ablikim Abliz, shows his uncle's family posing with an unknown Han Chinese man, second from the right, in Istanbul, Turkey. Abliz heard the Han Chinese man was part of a government homestay program meant to monitor his relatives, part of a broader crackdown on religious expression in China's far western region of Xinjiang. More than a million Chinese civil servants have been assigned to move into the homes of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities, spending weeks as uninvited guests. While government notices about the "Pair Up and Become Family" program portray it as an affectionate cultural exchange, exiled Uighurs living in Turkey said their loved ones saw the campaign as a chilling intrusion, aimed at coercing Uighurs into living secular lives like the Han majority. (Ablikim Abliz via AP)
November 30, 2018 - 12:48 am
ISTANBUL (AP) — The two women in the photograph were smiling, but Halmurat Idris knew something was terribly wrong. One was his 39-year-old sister; standing at her side was an elderly woman Idris did not know. Their grins were tight-lipped, mirthless. Her sister had posted the picture on a social...
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