Intellectual property

FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2019, file photo, Mitch Hungerpiller of Birmingham, Ala., who invented a computerized system to automate the processing of returned mail, poses for a photo outside of the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court is siding with an Alabama company over the U.S. Postal Service in a patent dispute. The justices said Monday, June 10, that the government can't use a 2011 law to challenge a patent held by Birmingham-based Return Mail. The dispute involves a patent Return Mail got for a system that processes mail that gets returned as undeliverable. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
June 10, 2019 - 11:04 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court sided Monday with an Alabama technology company over the U.S. Postal Service in a patent dispute. The dispute before the justices had to do with U.S. Patent No. 6,826,548. That's the patent Birmingham-based Return Mail has for a system that uses barcodes,...
Read More
June 10, 2019 - 10:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is siding with an Alabama company over the U.S. Postal Service in a patent dispute. The justices said Monday that the government can't use a 2011 law to challenge a patent held by Birmingham-based Return Mail. The dispute involves a patent Return Mail got for a...
Read More
June 04, 2019 - 8:11 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Dr. Patricia Bath, a pioneering ophthalmologist who became the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent after she invented a more precise treatment of cataracts, has died. She was 76. Bath died on May 30 from complications of cancer at a University of...
Read More
June 04, 2019 - 1:57 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Dr. Patricia Bath, a pioneering ophthalmologist who became the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent after she invented a more precise treatment of cataracts, has died. She was 76. Bath died on May 30 from complications of cancer at a University of...
Read More
June 04, 2019 - 1:00 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Dr. Patricia Bath, a pioneering ophthalmologist who became the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent after she invented a more precise treatment of cataracts, has died. She was 76. Bath died on May 30 from complications of cancer at a University of...
Read More
June 03, 2019 - 11:53 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Dr. Patricia Bath, a pioneering ophthalmologist who became the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent after she invented a more precise treatment of cataracts, has died. She was 76. Her daughter says Bath died from complications of cancer on May 30 at...
Read More
June 03, 2019 - 2:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A dispute involving the pirate Blackbeard's sunken ship is on deck for the Supreme Court's next term. The justices said Monday they will hear arguments in the fall in a copyright case involving the Queen Anne's Revenge, which was discovered off North Carolina's coast in 1996. The...
Read More
June 03, 2019 - 1:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A dispute involving the pirate Blackbeard's ship is on deck for the Supreme Court's next term. The justices said Monday they will hear a copyright dispute involving video and a photograph of the Queen Anne's Revenge. The ship was discovered off North Carolina in 1996. The case the...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2008, file photo, a the Mongols motorcycle club's logo is displayed at a news conference in Los Angeles. A federal judge on Friday, May 17, 2019, fined the Mongols motorcycle club $500,000 in a racketeering and conspiracy case but refused the latest effort in a decade-long attempt by the government to take away the club's control over its logo — a Genghis Khan-style rider in sunglasses astride a chopper-style bike. (AP Photo/Ric Francis, File)
May 18, 2019 - 7:59 am
SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — A federal judge on Friday fined the Mongols motorcycle club $500,000 in a racketeering and conspiracy case but refused the latest effort in a decade-long attempt by the government to take away the club's control over its logo — a Genghis Khan-style rider in sunglasses...
Read More
FILE- In this Sept. 5, 2018, file photo conspiracy theorist Alex Jones speaks outside of the Dirksen building of Capitol Hill in Washington. A federal judge will let a jury decide whether conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ Infowars website had a legal right to sell a poster featuring the image of Pepe the Frog, a character that became hijacked by far-right extremists. U.S. District Judge Michael Fitzgerald in Los Angeles refused Thursday, May 16, 2019 to throw out a copyright infringement lawsuit against Infowars over its poster sales filed by Pepe’s creator, California artist Matt Furie.(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
May 17, 2019 - 10:48 pm
A federal judge will let a jury decide whether conspiracy theorist Alex Jones' Infowars website had a legal right to sell a poster featuring the image of Pepe the Frog, a cartoon character that became hijacked by far-right extremists. U.S. District Judge Michael Fitzgerald refused Thursday to throw...
Read More

Pages