Insurance industry regulation

U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson attend a working breakfast at the Hotel du Palais on the sidelines of the G-7 summit in Biarritz, France, Sunday, Aug. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
August 25, 2019 - 12:29 pm
BIARRITZ, France (AP) — U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson acknowledged Sunday that the prospect of a Brexit deal was "touch and go," as other European Union capitals grasp the problems Britain has with the withdrawal agreement. Speaking on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit, Johnson said...
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U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson attend a working breakfast at the Hotel du Palais on the sidelines of the G-7 summit in Biarritz, France, Sunday, Aug. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
August 25, 2019 - 10:33 am
BIARRITZ, France (AP) — U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson acknowledged Sunday that the prospect of a Brexit deal was "touch and go," as other European Union capitals grasp the problems Britain has with the withdrawal agreement. Speaking on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit, Johnson said...
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U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson attend a working breakfast at the Hotel du Palais on the sidelines of the G-7 summit in Biarritz, France, Sunday, Aug. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
August 25, 2019 - 10:03 am
BIARRITZ, France (AP) — U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson acknowledged Sunday that the prospect of a Brexit deal was "touch and go," as other European Union capitals grasp the problems Britain has with the withdrawal agreement. Speaking on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit, Johnson said...
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U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson attend a working breakfast at the Hotel du Palais on the sidelines of the G-7 summit in Biarritz, France, Sunday, Aug. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
August 25, 2019 - 9:59 am
BIARRITZ, France (AP) — U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson acknowledged Sunday that the prospect of a Brexit deal was "touch and go," as other European Union capitals grasp the problems Britain has with the withdrawal agreement. Speaking on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit, Johnson said...
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Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 12:42 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Rank-and-file Democrats appear to be shifting to the middle on health care, worried about what's politically achievable on their party's top 2020 issue. While "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, the majority say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage...
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Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 10:51 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Democratic voters appear to be reassessing their approach to health care, a pragmatic shift on their party's top 2020 issue. While "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, majorities say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage instead of a new government program...
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Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 6:51 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Democratic voters appear to be reassessing their approach to health care, a pragmatic shift on their party's top 2020 issue. While "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, majorities say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage instead of a new government program...
Read More
Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 5:58 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Democratic voters appear to be reassessing their approach to health care, a pragmatic shift on their party's top 2020 issue. While "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, majorities say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage instead of a new government program...
Read More
Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 12:10 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Democratic voters appear to be reassessing their approach to health care, a pragmatic shift on their party's top 2020 issue. "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, but majorities say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage instead of a new government program...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 1949, file photo, Brigadier Gen. Wallace Harry Graham, right, personal physician of President Harry S. Truman checks his blood pressure in the president's office in Washington. Seventy years ago, before Medicare existed to inspire “Medicare for All,” a Democratic president wrestled with a challenge strikingly similar to what the party’s White House hopefuls face today. Harry Truman, then in his fourth year of pressing for a national health insurance system, parried criticism of his approach in terms that a single-payer health care advocate might use in 2019.(AP Photo/Henry Griffin, File)
August 05, 2019 - 12:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Seventy years ago, before Medicare existed to inspire "Medicare for All," a Democratic president wrestled with a challenge strikingly similar to what the party's White House hopefuls face today. Harry Truman, then in his fourth year of pressing for a national health insurance...
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