Insurance industry regulation

Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 12:42 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Rank-and-file Democrats appear to be shifting to the middle on health care, worried about what's politically achievable on their party's top 2020 issue. While "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, the majority say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage...
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Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 10:51 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Democratic voters appear to be reassessing their approach to health care, a pragmatic shift on their party's top 2020 issue. While "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, majorities say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage instead of a new government program...
Read More
Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 6:51 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Democratic voters appear to be reassessing their approach to health care, a pragmatic shift on their party's top 2020 issue. While "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, majorities say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage instead of a new government program...
Read More
Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 5:58 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Democratic voters appear to be reassessing their approach to health care, a pragmatic shift on their party's top 2020 issue. While "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, majorities say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage instead of a new government program...
Read More
Terrie Dietrich, left, and her daughter Erin Cross, talk in Dietrich’s home in Henderson, Nev., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. “Medicare for All” remains hugely popular, but majorities say they’d prefer building on “Obamacare” to expand coverage instead of a new government program that replaces America’s mix of private and public insurance. Democrat Dietrich, 74, has Medicare and supplements that with private insurance, an arrangement she said she’s pretty comfortable with. Cross, 54, also a Democrat, said she’s not comfortable with switching to a system where a government plan is the only choice. (AP Photo/Michelle L. Price)
August 23, 2019 - 12:10 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Democratic voters appear to be reassessing their approach to health care, a pragmatic shift on their party's top 2020 issue. "Medicare for All" remains hugely popular, but majorities say they'd prefer building on "Obamacare" to expand coverage instead of a new government program...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 1949, file photo, Brigadier Gen. Wallace Harry Graham, right, personal physician of President Harry S. Truman checks his blood pressure in the president's office in Washington. Seventy years ago, before Medicare existed to inspire “Medicare for All,” a Democratic president wrestled with a challenge strikingly similar to what the party’s White House hopefuls face today. Harry Truman, then in his fourth year of pressing for a national health insurance system, parried criticism of his approach in terms that a single-payer health care advocate might use in 2019.(AP Photo/Henry Griffin, File)
August 05, 2019 - 12:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Seventy years ago, before Medicare existed to inspire "Medicare for All," a Democratic president wrestled with a challenge strikingly similar to what the party's White House hopefuls face today. Harry Truman, then in his fourth year of pressing for a national health insurance...
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In this July 23, 2019, photo, Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in New Orleans. Biden is placing a big bet that his loyalty to the Affordable Care Act will help propel him to the Oval Office. Yet his argument isn’t without openings for attacks. From the left, he’s certain to take heat from progressives who back the single-payer, government run system proposed by his rival Bernie Sanders and supported by Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 28, 2019 - 4:06 pm
Joe Biden had just rolled out his health care plan when he made what could be a fateful pledge to a crowd in Iowa: "If you like your health care plan or your employer-based plan, you can keep it." The remark echoed assurances President Barack Obama made repeatedly as he sold the Affordable Care Act...
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In this July 23, 2019, photo, Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in New Orleans. Biden is placing a big bet that his loyalty to the Affordable Care Act will help propel him to the Oval Office. Yet his argument isn’t without openings for attacks. From the left, he’s certain to take heat from progressives who back the single-payer, government run system proposed by his rival Bernie Sanders and supported by Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 28, 2019 - 12:54 pm
Joe Biden had just rolled out his health care plan when he made what could be a fateful pledge to a crowd in Iowa: "If you like your health care plan or your employer-based plan, you can keep it." The remark echoed assurances President Barack Obama made repeatedly as he sold the Affordable Care Act...
Read More
In this July 23, 2019, photo, Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in New Orleans. Biden is placing a big bet that his loyalty to the Affordable Care Act will help propel him to the Oval Office. Yet his argument isn’t without openings for attacks. From the left, he’s certain to take heat from progressives who back the single-payer, government run system proposed by his rival Bernie Sanders and supported by Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 28, 2019 - 12:40 pm
Joe Biden had just rolled out his health care plan when he made what could be a fateful pledge to a crowd in Iowa: "If you like your health care plan or your employer-based plan, you can keep it." The remark echoed assurances President Barack Obama made repeatedly as he sold the Affordable Care Act...
Read More
In this July 23, 2019, photo, Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in New Orleans. Biden is placing a big bet that his loyalty to the Affordable Care Act will help propel him to the Oval Office. Yet his argument isn’t without openings for attacks. From the left, he’s certain to take heat from progressives who back the single-payer, government run system proposed by his rival Bernie Sanders and supported by Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 28, 2019 - 12:33 pm
Joe Biden had just rolled out his health care plan when he made what could be a fateful pledge to a crowd in Iowa: "If you like your health care plan or your employer-based plan, you can keep it." The remark echoed assurances President Barack Obama made repeatedly as he sold the Affordable Care Act...
Read More

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