Infectious diseases

FILE - In this June 27, 2012 file photo, a patient uses an oral test for HIV, inside the HIV Testing Room at the Penn Branch of the District of Columbia Department of Motor Vehicles, in southeast Washington. Free mail-order HIV tests for high-risk men offer a potentially better strategy for curbing disease spread than usual care, according to a U.S. government study published Monday, Nov. 18, 2019, in JAMA Internal Medicine, that resulted in many more infections detected - including among friends with whom recipients shared extra kits. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
November 18, 2019 - 11:33 am
Mailing free home HIV tests to high-risk men offers a potentially better strategy for detecting infections than usual care. That’s according to a U.S. government study that resulted in many more infections found — including among friends with whom recipients shared extra kits. The yearlong...
Read More
Steve Hurd of Hurd's Farm in Hampton, N.H., looks over his livestock on Nov. 7, 2019. Hurd now raises cows, pigs, chickens and turkeys, for beef, pork, poultry and eggs. (Rich Beauchesne/Portsmouth Herald via AP)
November 14, 2019 - 12:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — China is reopening its market to U.S. poultry, ending a five-year ban. China had blocked U.S. poultry imports after an outbreak of avian influenza in December 2014, closing off a market that bought more than $500 million worth of American chicken, turkey and other poultry products...
Read More
In this Aug. 20, 2019 file photo, a relative embraces a young patient receiving treatment for dengue at the University School Hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In an international report released on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, doctors say children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents had. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
November 14, 2019 - 1:23 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents experienced, an international report by doctors said. With increasing diarrhea diseases, more dangerous heat waves, air pollution and increases in mosquito-borne...
Read More
In this Aug. 20, 2019 file photo, a relative embraces a young patient receiving treatment for dengue at the University School Hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In an international report released on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, doctors say children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents had. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
November 13, 2019 - 6:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents experienced, an international report by doctors said. With increasing diarrhea diseases, more dangerous heat waves, air pollution and increases in mosquito-borne...
Read More
This 1971 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria, which causes the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. In a report released Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated about 36,000 Americans died from drug-resistant infections in 2017 _ down about 18% from an estimated 44,000 in 2013. Though deaths may be going down, non-fatal infections increased nationally from 2013 to 2017, from 2.6 million to 2.8 million. Dramatic increases in drug-resistant gonorrhea, urinary tract infections, and group A strep were largely to blame. (CDC via AP)
November 13, 2019 - 2:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Drug-resistant “superbug” infections have been called a developing nightmare that could set medicine back a century, making conquered germs once again untreatable. So there’s some surprising news in a report released Wednesday: U.S. superbug deaths appear to be going down. About 36,...
Read More
This 1971 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria, which causes the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. In a report released Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated about 36,000 Americans died from drug-resistant infections in 2017 _ down about 18% from an estimated 44,000 in 2013. Though deaths may be going down, non-fatal infections increased nationally from 2013 to 2017, from 2.6 million to 2.8 million. Dramatic increases in drug-resistant gonorrhea, urinary tract infections, and group A strep were largely to blame. (CDC via AP)
November 13, 2019 - 1:20 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Drug-resistant “superbug” infections have been called a developing nightmare that make conquered germs once again untreatable. So there’s some surprising news in a federal report released Wednesday: U.S. superbug deaths appear to be going down. The Centers for Disease Control and...
Read More
November 04, 2019 - 7:45 am
BENI, Congo (AP) — Authorities in eastern Congo say a journalist who was working to spread awareness about the Ebola crisis has been killed. Papy Mahamba Mumbere, who worked at a radio station in Congo's Ituri province, also had been serving as a community health worker in the village of Lwemba...
Read More
FILE - This Nov. 20, 2018 file photo shows Romaine Lettuce in Simi Valley, Calif. Health officials are disclosing another E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce from the summer 2019, but say it appears to be over. The disclosure comes after romaine producers pledged to step up safety measures following a series of outbreaks, including one last year that sickened more than 200 and killed five. Experts say it’s not clear why romaine keeps getting tainted. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)
November 01, 2019 - 4:43 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials disclosed another food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce, but they said it appears to be over. The disclosure late Thursday comes after the produce industry said it was stepping up safety measures following a series of outbreaks , including one last...
Read More
FILE - This Nov. 20, 2018 file photo shows Romaine Lettuce in Simi Valley, Calif. Health officials are disclosing another E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce from the summer 2019, but say it appears to be over. The disclosure comes after romaine producers pledged to step up safety measures following a series of outbreaks, including one last year that sickened more than 200 and killed five. Experts say it’s not clear why romaine keeps getting tainted. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)
November 01, 2019 - 4:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials disclosed another food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce, but they said it appears to be over. The disclosure late Thursday comes after the produce industry said it was stepping up safety measures following a series of outbreaks , including one last...
Read More
FILE- In this March 27, 2019, file photo, vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine sit in a cooler at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. Research released on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, shows yet another reason to vaccinate children against measles. After a bout of measles, youngsters are more vulnerable to other germs _ from chickenpox to strep _ that they once could fend off. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
October 31, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system's memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the startling findings "immune amnesia." The body can...
Read More

Pages