Industry regulation

File- Picture taken on March 5, 2019 shows a black rhinoceros in the savannah landscape of the Etosha National Park. ( Matthias Toedt/AP via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 5:33 pm
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
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File- Picture taken on March 5, 2019 shows a black rhinoceros in the savannah landscape of the Etosha National Park. ( Matthias Toedt/AP via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 5:26 pm
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
Read More
File- Picture taken on March 5, 2019 shows a black rhinoceros in the savannah landscape of the Etosha National Park. ( Matthias Toedt/AP via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 10:26 am
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
Read More
Swiss Interior Minister Alain Berset, center, sitting next to Ivonne Higuero, right, CITES Secretary-General ( Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), delivers his statement, during the opening remarks of the World Wildlife Conference - CITES CoP18, in Geneva, Switzerland, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 8:42 am
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
Read More
Swiss Interior Minister Alain Berset, center, sitting next to Ivonne Higuero, right, CITES Secretary-General ( Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), delivers his statement, during the opening remarks of the World Wildlife Conference - CITES CoP18, in Geneva, Switzerland, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 6:55 am
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
Read More
Swiss Interior Minister Alain Berset, center, sitting next to Ivonne Higuero, right, CITES Secretary-General ( Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), delivers his statement, during the opening remarks of the World Wildlife Conference - CITES CoP18, in Geneva, Switzerland, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 4:53 am
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
Read More
FILE - This Aug. 4, 2015 file photo, flowers bloom in front of the Salt Lake Temple, at Temple Square, in Salt Lake City. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is reminding members that coffee is prohibited no matter how fancy the name, that vaping is banned despite the alluring flavors and that marijuana is outlawed unless prescribed by a competent doctor. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
August 16, 2019 - 8:32 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has issued a warning to members that coffee is prohibited no matter how fancy the name, that vaping is banned despite the alluring flavors and that marijuana is outlawed unless prescribed by "competent" doctors. The new guidance...
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FILE - This Aug. 4, 2015 file photo, flowers bloom in front of the Salt Lake Temple, at Temple Square, in Salt Lake City. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is reminding members that coffee is prohibited no matter how fancy the name, that vaping is banned despite the alluring flavors and that marijuana is outlawed unless prescribed by a competent doctor. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
August 16, 2019 - 6:53 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has issued a warning to members that coffee is prohibited no matter how fancy the name, that vaping is banned despite the alluring flavors and that marijuana is outlawed unless prescribed by "competent" doctors. The new guidance...
Read More
FILE – In this June 26, 2018 file photo, a Nissan Leaf charges at a recharge station while parked by the Denver City County Building in downtown Denver. The Colorado Air Quality Control Commission approved a new regulation on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, requiring that at least 5% of the vehicles sold in the state by 2023 emit zero pollution. The rule approved Friday by the state Air Quality Control Commission applies to auto manufactures, not buyers. It's intended to boost the number of electric vehicles in a state struggling to control air pollution in heavily populated areas. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
August 16, 2019 - 4:56 pm
DENVER (AP) — Colorado tightened its air quality regulations on Friday, requiring that at least 5% of the vehicles sold in the state by 2023 emit zero pollution. The state Air Quality Control Commission, which passed the rule on an 8-1 vote, said the requirement applies to auto manufacturers, not...
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FILE – In this June 26, 2018 file photo, a Nissan Leaf charges at a recharge station while parked by the Denver City County Building in downtown Denver. The Colorado Air Quality Control Commission approved a new regulation on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, requiring that at least 5% of the vehicles sold in the state by 2023 emit zero pollution. The rule approved Friday by the state Air Quality Control Commission applies to auto manufactures, not buyers. It's intended to boost the number of electric vehicles in a state struggling to control air pollution in heavily populated areas. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
August 16, 2019 - 4:27 pm
DENVER (AP) — Colorado is tightening its air quality regulations and requiring at least 5% of the vehicles sold in the state by 2023 to emit zero pollution. The rule approved Friday by the state Air Quality Control Commission applies to auto manufactures, not buyers. It's aimed at boosting electric...
Read More

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